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Thread: Black & White?

  1. #1

    Default Black & White?

    Hey guys, wanna ask if you guys shoot b&w photos using the "b&w mode", OR, shoot normally, but use photoshop afterwards and change it into black & white?
    Is there any difference? In what way?
    Opinionsssssssss please.

  2. #2
    Member
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    Default Re: Black & White?

    Shooting JPEGs in b&w (and in fact any other fancy modes like sepia, etc) is not reversible, so do always shoot in colour unless you are 100% sure you want the effect for good.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Black & White?

    Quote Originally Posted by redtealongan View Post
    Shooting JPEGs in b&w (and in fact any other fancy modes like sepia, etc) is not reversible, so do always shoot in colour unless you are 100% sure you want the effect for good.
    oh yea you are quite righty. XD
    thanks for the advice!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Black & White?

    There is a slight colour contrast difference when you shoot in colour (and converted to B&W).
    This provides for deeper contrast & tones.

    The advantage of shooting in B&W is that you tend to 'think' black and white more often. Its also quicker when it comes to PP.
    The sooner you get it, the longer you enjoy it.
    I welcome you @ www.benaw.zenfolio.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Black & White?

    One other note - shooting in color and converting to BW in post gives you much greater control of the tonality of the image. You can mix the R/G/B channels in different ratios during the conversion to BW and you will find you can achieve dramatically different results. Further, you still have the color information, and you can use that to produce more interesting images, like highly desaturated images that aren't quite black and white, etc.

    Take a look here:

    http://www.andreasoverland.no/articles/blackwhite/

    And here:

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...w_better.shtml

    For some ideas.

    Take Care,
    Eric

  6. #6
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Black & White?

    Quote Originally Posted by shootjutsu View Post
    Hey guys, wanna ask if you guys shoot b&w photos using the "b&w mode", OR, shoot normally, but use photoshop afterwards and change it into black & white?
    Is there any difference? In what way?
    Opinionsssssssss please.
    best is to shoot in RAW and convert at your preference in post-processing... there are a multitude of ways to do so anyway, each offers a different effect.
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  7. #7

    Default Re: Black & White?

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    best is to shoot in RAW and convert at your preference in post-processing... there are a multitude of ways to do so anyway, each offers a different effect.
    omg really? but if not wrong, RAW is taking up much bigger space than fine right? most of the time i put it 'fine' rather than 'normal', and i wonder if there is difference in that too. :x
    but is it fine for me to put it in 'fine'? cos i am still a newbie though, yea?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Black & White?

    Quote Originally Posted by Benji77 View Post
    There is a slight colour contrast difference when you shoot in colour (and converted to B&W).
    This provides for deeper contrast & tones.

    The advantage of shooting in B&W is that you tend to 'think' black and white more often. Its also quicker when it comes to PP.
    yea i super agree with this. :x

  9. #9

    Default Re: Black & White?

    Quote Originally Posted by ericschmerick View Post
    One other note - shooting in color and converting to BW in post gives you much greater control of the tonality of the image. You can mix the R/G/B channels in different ratios during the conversion to BW and you will find you can achieve dramatically different results. Further, you still have the color information, and you can use that to produce more interesting images, like highly desaturated images that aren't quite black and white, etc.

    Take a look here:

    http://www.andreasoverland.no/articles/blackwhite/

    And here:

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...w_better.shtml

    For some ideas.

    Take Care,
    Eric
    aha now i see the difference. thanks for the precious share!

  10. #10
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Black & White?

    Quote Originally Posted by shootjutsu View Post
    omg really? but if not wrong, RAW is taking up much bigger space than fine right? most of the time i put it 'fine' rather than 'normal', and i wonder if there is difference in that too. :x
    but is it fine for me to put it in 'fine'? cos i am still a newbie though, yea?
    "Fine" is fine - RAW is more than just "much bigger space". It is the pure image as seen by the sensor in the moment of exposure. Together with some additional information (e.g. EXIF) it is stored in memory card - that's all. JPG is already processed in the camera by applying settings like Saturation, Sharpness, Contrast, Compression ... some people use Picture Styles which is nothing but a preset of all these parameters suitable for a certain image type. The result (especially of the JPG compression) is a loss of information. That's why JPG files are smaller.
    As mentioned by ericschmerick when you convert manually you have more choices for the various different parameters of the image. But if the necessary information are already crippled or lost due to JPG compression then your possibilities are limited. Better start with RAW for any conversion. Check the section "Digital Darkroom" for further details of digital workflow. Plenty of information there.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Black & White?

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    "Fine" is fine - RAW is more than just "much bigger space". It is the pure image as seen by the sensor in the moment of exposure. Together with some additional information (e.g. EXIF) it is stored in memory card - that's all. JPG is already processed in the camera by applying settings like Saturation, Sharpness, Contrast, Compression ... some people use Picture Styles which is nothing but a preset of all these parameters suitable for a certain image type. The result (especially of the JPG compression) is a loss of information. That's why JPG files are smaller.
    As mentioned by ericschmerick when you convert manually you have more choices for the various different parameters of the image. But if the necessary information are already crippled or lost due to JPG compression then your possibilities are limited. Better start with RAW for any conversion. Check the section "Digital Darkroom" for further details of digital workflow. Plenty of information there.
    alrights thanks! *goingnow*

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