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Thread: Newbie for portraits lens

  1. #21

    Default Re: Newbie for portraits lens

    Quote Originally Posted by devilzheart View Post
    thks for all the comments.

    was think of achieving bokeh or blur background.....sorry i'm a newbie....
    Shoot with a compact then edit on a computer. Saves you all the money on (D)SLR and Lenses.
    Tum podem extulit horridulum...日出東方﹐唯我不敗。

  2. #22
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Newbie for portraits lens

    Quote Originally Posted by devilzheart View Post
    was think of achieving bokeh or blur background.....sorry i'm a newbie....
    What have you read so far about that topic? Do you know that it's the result of Depth of Field? As mentioned: don't just put on a lens and assume your 'effect' will kick in. In fact, you can achieve blur background with other lenses as well, provided you understand what contributes to it. Time to read: Understanding Depth of Field in Photography

  3. #23

    Default Re: Newbie for portraits lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    What have you read so far about that topic? Do you know that it's the result of Depth of Field? As mentioned: don't just put on a lens and assume your 'effect' will kick in. In fact, you can achieve blur background with other lenses as well, provided you understand what contributes to it. Time to read: Understanding Depth of Field in Photography
    gosh this is what i need thanks alot XD

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Newbie for portraits lens

    Quote Originally Posted by devilzheart View Post
    thks for all the comments.

    was think of achieving bokeh or blur background.....sorry i'm a newbie....
    You might want to describe the situation and effect you're trying to achieve, and may be even post an example.

    If you're expecting a 50mm to give you a full body portrait with a totally blurred background, you're gonna be disappointed. But a half-body shot, or certainly headshot, presuming sufficient separation from the background, you should have a very nice bokeh at f/1.8 or even smaller apertures. And for full-body portraits, it's still a fine lens, you just need to be careful on background distance/content.

    Agree with the previous poster that you may want to read up on depth of field as well.

    If you looking for full-body shots with nice creamy bokeh, then you should be using a longer lens (say, 300mm f/2.8) and make sure you have sufficient separation (distance) between your background and subject. Maybe that's what you're meaning by "effect".



    But for headshots, or half-body shots, 50 f/1.8 will do it.

    This image was at 52mm (on a 24-70) and f/2.8. The background is a curtain, and I think it's sufficiently out of focus. Not at great example of "bokeh" per se, but it's an example of the depth of focus one can achieve at that focal length even at f/2.8 (though this is on a full-frame 1DS2).



    Eric
    Last edited by ericschmerick; 18th June 2009 at 02:26 PM.
    Hi.

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