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Thread: Vignetting, white balance queries

  1. #1

    Default Vignetting, white balance queries

    2 questions to ask the experience club snappers

    1. Can you preview vignetting on a film slr (mine is a F60 body, 24-135 mm tamron lens), and does it depend on the conditions that I am in? eg bright sun, mild weather, etc. how does one prevent it besides removing unwanted filters?

    2. Is white balance problem only available on digital bodies? hope thats not a too goondu question.

    thanks for all feed back in advance....

  2. #2

    Default

    1) There is a difference between vignetting and light falloff. Vignetting actually means a sharp cutoff in light at the corners and this happens only if your lens is blocked. You may or may not be able to see this depending on severity. Note that your F60 viewfinder is not 100%(rated 90%) and hence you may not see what is happening in the last 10% of the image edges.

    Normally, if you are not stacking excessive filters, there shouldn't be vignetting. However, there may be light-falloff at the corners if you shoot at wide open aperture at target large open areas of even colour.(i.e sky shots). Stepping down the aperture will usually eliminate light falloff.

    2)Nope, film also has a white balance. There are Daylight balanced filmes (5500K) and Tungsten(3200K) balanced films.

    In certain situations or when using slides, you still need to use correction filters for optimum colour balance.

    For negative prints, there are technologies employed to make them less susceptible to colour inbalance, in addition to that, colour is correctible on print so there isn't much of an issue unless the colour cast is very severe.

  3. #3

    Default

    1) There is a difference between vignetting and light falloff. Vignetting actually means a sharp cutoff in light at the corners and this happens only if your lens is blocked. You may or may not be able to see this depending on severity. Note that your F60 viewfinder is not 100%(rated 90%) and hence you may not see what is happening in the last 10% of the image edges.

    Normally, if you are not stacking excessive filters, there shouldn't be vignetting. However, there may be light-falloff at the corners if you shoot at wide open aperture at target large open areas of even colour.(i.e sky shots). Stepping down the aperture will usually eliminate light falloff.

    [COLOR=Blue]stepping as in F8, f11? its probably due to experience right?

    2)Nope, film also has a white balance. There are Daylight balanced filmes (5500K) and Tungsten(3200K) balanced films.

    In certain situations or when using slides, you still need to use correction filters for optimum colour balance.

    hmm...can you kindly expand on this point? For example, the difference between a snow environment, and a tropical setting. I am currently using elitechrome 100 (thinking of switching to velvia). the filters that i have using so far is just the circular polarisor..
    For negative prints, there are technologies employed to make them less susceptible to colour inbalance, in addition to that, colour is correctible on print so there isn't much of an issue unless the colour cast is very severe.

    thanks a lot for your advice!
    Last edited by Stefen; 23rd November 2003 at 11:22 PM.

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