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Thread: How to get Blue ...?

  1. #1
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    Default How to get Blue ...?

    what accessories to buy to capture Very Blue Sky during afternoon sunlight .... ?
    SOS

  2. #2

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    Shooting on film or digital?

    Tried a circular polariser? It will create a deep blue sky (it's effect will depend on the position of the sun when you shoot). One of the few filters that is a must have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    what accessories to buy to capture Very Blue Sky during afternoon sunlight .... ?
    SOS
    Think you can use a circular polarizer. It also helps to stop down when the sun is too bright...

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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    Think you can use a circular polarizer. It also helps to stop down when the sun is too bright...
    but how come some polarizers cost only $20 (Tokina) but the B+W costs $150? Is the difference only in built-quality or are they technically difference in design/built?
    Or is it that all polarizers are just the same special-built filters?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    but how come some polarizers cost only $20 (Tokina) but the B+W costs $150? Is the difference only in built-quality or are they technically difference in design/built?
    Or is it that all polarizers are just the same special-built filters?
    Only built and glass quality difference. You should proberbly get the $20 one first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    but how come some polarizers cost only $20 (Tokina) but the B+W costs $150? Is the difference only in built-quality or are they technically difference in design/built?
    Or is it that all polarizers are just the same special-built filters?
    The price quality reflects the difference in quality of the glass probably. Some people say $20 is fine, others say that the quality of the picture you take fianlly comes down to the filters you use (ie if you have expensive lens and cheapo filter...then picture becomes "cheapo")

    So guess you have to go figure that one out for yourself....I don't have a problem with cheapo filters... I use Tokina and Hoya ones....

    You shoot with digital? If yes, might not even need the polarizer, just PS the picture.

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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    You shoot with digital? If yes, might not even need the polarizer, just PS the picture.
    How to use PS for a good effect on the blue cloud? Normally the whole sky appear white. :-(

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    How to use PS for a good effect on the blue cloud? Normally the whole sky appear white. :-(
    You can play with the colour balance and increase the blues and cyans.
    What camera do you anyhow? Sky should not become white. What kind of metering do you use? Spot? Center-weighted?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    How to use PS for a good effect on the blue cloud? Normally the whole sky appear white. :-(
    Well if you are shooting with the sky as a background to your subject and using matrix metering, most (if not all) digital cameras will wash out the sky. There is too much contrast for the sensor to handle it. If you are shooting the sky only, then it should not wash out (well not as much). Try using exposure compensation and/or spot metering.

    Exception to the above would be if using a graduated ND filter, this would help balance the contrast between sky and subject.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Royce
    Well if you are shooting with the sky as a background to your subject and using matrix metering, most (if not all) digital cameras will wash out the sky. There is too much contrast for the sensor to handle it. If you are shooting the sky only, then it should not wash out (well not as much). Try using exposure compensation and/or spot metering.
    Camera: 10D.
    This is exactly what always happen if the sky is far behind and the subject is right in front. The problem is especially bad when at the seaside/beach in the sunny afternoons (12 to 4pm). I hope the Polarizer will help (juz like those postcard quality - lone beautiful babe with swimsuit at a sandy beach with wind blowing on her long hair and the open flying scarf over her head, and small waves, with nice clouds and a very BLUE sky!). juz day dreaming.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    Camera: 10D.
    This is exactly what always happen if the sky is far behind and the subject is right in front. The problem is especially bad when at the seaside/beach in the sunny afternoons (12 to 4pm). I hope the Polarizer will help (juz like those postcard quality - lone beautiful babe with swimsuit at a sandy beach with wind blowing on her long hair and the open flying scarf over her head, and small waves, with nice clouds and a very BLUE sky!). juz day dreaming.....
    Have you tried to do a metering on the sky, then do an exposure lock and then reframe your shot on the subject? Auto WB?

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    Have you tried to do a metering on the sky, then do an exposure lock and then reframe your shot on the subject? Auto WB?
    That would make subject too dark because sky is going to be much brighter.
    White Balance is also not the issue here.

    My suggestions would be:
    Spot meter on subject - sky will be dark, but perhaps can lighten in PS.
    Spot meter on sky - use fill in flash to compensate on subject
    Spot meter on sky - use reflector to compensate on subject

    Also try shooting early in the morning or late evening. Less contrast and better colours at that time of day. Shooting at mid-day will always produce contrasty images with washed out colours.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Royce
    That would make subject too dark because sky is going to be much brighter.
    White Balance is also not the issue here.

    My suggestions would be:
    Spot meter on subject - sky will be dark, but perhaps can lighten in PS.
    Spot meter on sky - use fill in flash to compensate on subject
    Spot meter on sky - use reflector to compensate on subject

    Also try shooting early in the morning or late evening. Less contrast and better colours at that time of day. Shooting at mid-day will always produce contrasty images with washed out colours.
    Errr...ever thought of using a fill flash?

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    Errr...ever thought of using a fill flash?
    Isn't that what i said?

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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    Have you tried to do a metering on the sky, then do an exposure lock and then reframe your shot on the subject? Auto WB?
    what metering? mi juz a newbie, where can i read on this subject?


    Quote Originally Posted by Royce
    Also try shooting early in the morning or late evening. Less contrast and better colours at that time of day. Shooting at mid-day will always produce contrasty images with washed out colours.
    sometimes go on a group tour can't control timing. Lunch near the beach and then given half an hr to shoot (eg Bali Kuta beach) evening of course no more problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Royce
    Isn't that what i said?
    Oops...sorry did not see that ...haha

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    what metering? mi juz a newbie, where can i read on this subject?



    sometimes go on a group tour can't control timing. Lunch near the beach and then given half an hr to shoot (eg Bali Kuta beach) evening of course no more problem.
    Erm...sorry ah...you use a 10D and you dunno what metering is? What mode do you take ur pictures in? (or are you pulling my leg)

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    what metering? mi juz a newbie, where can i read on this subject?
    You can start by reading the camera's manual from cover to cover! There shoul be some explanations of metering and how to choose the different methods for your camera. The internet will have all the answers you need also.

    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    sometimes go on a group tour can't control timing. Lunch near the beach and then given half an hr to shoot (eg Bali Kuta beach) evening of course no more problem.
    So don't go on the tour. Find out where the tour goes, which spots are good for photography and get there on your own (morning or evening). You'll get much better photos that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Royce
    Well if you are shooting with the sky as a background to your subject and using matrix metering, most (if not all) digital cameras will wash out the sky. There is too much contrast for the sensor to handle it. If you are shooting the sky only, then it should not wash out (well not as much). Try using exposure compensation and/or spot metering.

    Exception to the above would be if using a graduated ND filter, this would help balance the contrast between sky and subject.
    Actually, thats not quite true - a clear blue sky with no/few clouds is not going to wash out unless your main subject is in the shade/shadows. Clear blue sky is quite near to a middle tone, and if your subject is in good light with a clear blue sky as background, both subject and sky should be within the dynamic range of the camera/film.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauLEE
    Camera: 10D.
    This is exactly what always happen if the sky is far behind and the subject is right in front. The problem is especially bad when at the seaside/beach in the sunny afternoons (12 to 4pm). I hope the Polarizer will help (juz like those postcard quality - lone beautiful babe with swimsuit at a sandy beach with wind blowing on her long hair and the open flying scarf over her head, and small waves, with nice clouds and a very BLUE sky!). juz day dreaming.....
    You can achieve such shots too, but the effects of a polarizer are much more pronounced when the sun is lower (eg before 10am and after 2pm) and at right angles to your background (eg sun not directly behind or in front).

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