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Thread: Do you get stares?

  1. #21
    louis
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    Quote Originally Posted by HelmetBox
    I tried to act pro once, but then gabra nearly fall!! wakakakaka! My face cannot act pro lah. Sad, maybe must quit photography liaoz!
    haha,brother,maybe what you need is a nikon vest,neck id strap to act more like reporter.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by HelmetBox
    I tried to act pro once, but then gabra nearly fall!! wakakakaka! My face cannot act pro lah. Sad, maybe must quit photography liaoz!
    need my face to act pro...my face can act pro.... just kidding...

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by louis
    haha,brother,maybe what you need is a nikon vest,neck id strap to act more like reporter.
    Wakakaka, if so, fall down lagi malu!

    Then there's a fear of those aunties think you reporter ask u interview them than keep asking when they will appear in the news or papers! heheheeeeeeeeeeeeee.......

    I guess all these just adds spice to the hobby itself

  4. #24
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    Just wear one of those nikon/canon camera man type of vest, take out your tripod or monopod and snap away. Those with SLRs normally get away with it. But if you are going to be using an A70 or a 602z or some other digicam to take picture, its an invitation for alienation.

    Most important: Learn to pretend to shoot at something behind them. Works 50% of the time. Either that or change to taking macros or scenery.

  5. #25

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    fwah! think must start another thread on the tactics used for street photography! wakakaka You all have damn innovative ideas!

  6. #26

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    Hahaha... But then, point a camera too long at one fella and he'll feel violated. HAHAHAA.. True right?

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by OzOn3
    Hahaha... But then, point a camera too long at one fella and he'll feel violated. HAHAHAA.. True right?
    I will feel violated if I was pointed at.

    I would feel tired from holding the camera if I was pointing

  8. #28
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    You can pretend that you are not taking that person photo, but does the person think the same as you...

  9. #29
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    I saw a senior (as in about 40 yrs old) photographer a few days back at Geylang walking around with a SLR and a long big lens. One cool thing he did was, to wrap his lens with a 'towel/cloth' that blends with his outfit. He points his gun downward as his eyes wonder around. At the other side of the road, 2 of his buddies (I think, as they were similarly dressed) were sitting on an OH bridge, strategically positioned.

    As for me, I use a 20mm or 28mm wide angle lens, even as I compose with the subject placed in a third of the frame, the camera wont be seen pointing at them.


  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by HelmetBox
    I'm a newbie with photography. The other day in school when I tried to do some 'streetshooting', I get stares from everyone around. I felt like a total outcast then....... Have anyone of you felt this way when you first started? Is it normal? How did you overcome it?
    Guess it is normal especially in the Singapore context. And most traditional Chinese don't like strangers taking their pictures. Guess they afraid wait you take their picture and put a curse on them.

    How to get over it? A few ways for me. Soemthings I just be thick-skin and just shoot and then walk away. Sometimes just don;t shoot, walk away come back later, other times change to zoom and take from a distance.

    It really depends on how badly you want the shot I guess. Another method I try when I want to be inconspicous is to use a wide lens. That way the subject will be in the frame without them actually knowing that you are taking them.

    Cheers

  11. #31

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    Do you stare someone who take a photo of you ?

    I guess is the same question
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

  12. #32

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    many photography books advise about how to take street photography. The experience you folks are discussing isn't new and will continue to resurface. The books do a great work on this and I shan't expound furthur on their advice. Personally, I like street photography too and am still working on taking pictures without letting fear seep in too much.

    Why don't you folks think of it this way: when more of us are out there shooting people, the public won't feel we are such an alien after all. When I was in Tokyo, photography is so popular. In the big parks, there are so many folks taking macro. In the streets of Ginza, there are so many folks shooting people all the time. The public don't even give 2 hoots!

    I never even shot street photography before my trip to Tokyo, but made my 1st street photography there! I also made my 1st invitation to a member of the public to pose for me for my picture. Haha... unfortunately until now, this Japanese who posed for me is still the only member of the public I dared to invite to pose for me.

    P/S I don't speak Japanese, but use the International language of....... finger pointing and body language. :P

  13. #33

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    Ok here is my trick, hehehe maybe you can try this but always try to avoid offence to the public. Ok here goes....long or short lens or small cameras, try to pretent as if you shooting something else but you are actually shooting the main subject (Street photography) if the subject is off your view finder side turn slowly to avoid any notice of your subject then snap then turn slowly again off your subject and back again and snap again. Well it always works for me all the time. The next trick is point your camera without looking at your subject and not looking into your viewfinder, try to aim at your subject at the angle you want and look away then snap a few shots at different angle, also try to avoid any notice of your subject and offences of the public. Hope all this helps but shoot with fun don't offence anyone.

    (Travel photography) Don't know their language? do some body language like use your finger point it at your camera and do something like asking to take a photo of them kind of body language if they shake their head then don't take, then in some countrys they ask you for money when photo has being taken so everything has to be prepare on your side. Hope all this helps again

    Cheers,
    Henry
    Last edited by ammox77; 17th November 2003 at 10:13 AM.

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by ammox77
    (Travel photography) Don't know their language? do some body language like use your finger point it at your camera and do something like asking to take a photo of them kind of body language if they shake their head then don't take, then in some countrys they ask you for money when photo has being taken so everything has to be prepare on your side. Hope all this helps again

    Cheers,
    Henry
    Oh yeah i forgot to mention....the travel photography part is i read it in some photography mag

  15. #35

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    Mr Henry! My exams over le, when wanna bring me out pass me a few skills or two? But then got stupid school project, everyday till 5pm....... shoot sunset by then

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by HelmetBox
    Mr Henry! My exams over le, when wanna bring me out pass me a few skills or two? But then got stupid school project, everyday till 5pm....... shoot sunset by then
    hahahaha ok, 'Mr Henry'? you make me sound so old hahaha
    anyway yeah sure why not i usually go shoot out on weekends want to join me?

    Henry

  17. #37

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    Haha...
    What I always do is to anticipate, aim, shoot, stay.

    Anticipate
    See where the subject is going... Position yourself a distance in front of the subject

    Aim
    Compose your shot. Imagine that the subject is at the spot.

    Shoot
    When the subject moves into the area, take a burst of shots.

    Stay
    Continue aiming at that angle, let the subject go by.

    Most of the time they think U're shooting something else...
    But if they're the kind 1s & try to avoid your line of sight, means they may be kind enuff to pose for u...

    I usually sit at 1 spot, where there's people walking by, & make sure the lighting is good. Camp there like a sniper in counterstrike...

  18. #38
    Moderator ed9119's Avatar
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    First time i took a pic of a stranger 4-6 ft away, I almost had a heart attack..... heart pounding like crazy.....hands trembling.....totally out of my comfort zone

    anyone ever thought about actually speaking to the subject?

    I took this pic of aunties at Havelock Rd outside the wet market. Spoke to them for a minute to ask if they meet like this every morning and other small talk. Then just squat down somewhere nearby and shoot.

    Pic is titled 'Grapevines Gather' located here

    http://www.walkeast.com/galleries.php?id=18

    sori, cant seem to directly upload from my website.

    One other thing, and the earlier poster was right about violating people by spending too much time... nobody likes to be the center of attention for too long. So, compose and construct the image in your mind first, decide on an exposure reading before even bringing up the camera to your eye to shoot.

    Even if the subject was a willing poser, dun outstay your welcome by looking thru the viewfinder and fiddling around with the controls..... it just reflects one thing....that the photographer is not ready to create the image

    Street shooting requires practice in social/people skills

    Be sincere too

    ed
    Last edited by ed9119; 17th November 2003 at 04:39 PM.

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by ed9119
    anyone ever thought about actually speaking to the subject?

    I took this pic of aunties at Havelock Rd outside the wet market. Spoke to them for a minute to ask if they meet like this every morning.

    Street shooting requires practice in social/people skills

    Be sincere too
    hmm...hehehe i'm still working on it.....i see your website you have great photos there on your gallery i love all your shots

    Henry

  20. #40
    Moderator ed9119's Avatar
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    hi Ammox,

    they represent the 5-10% of keepers....so just imagine how many images that I've trashed.....I'm no different from you guys.

    forgot to mention.....especially to those who travel overseas...shoot locally first and apply yourself when shooting overseas...it really helps. I used to get 'Fool's Courage' when I traveled to shoot in the past just because I was a foreigner and can fantasize I was some kind of pro shooter. I ended up with lots of 'dead' lifeless people pics.

    Shooting on the street to me....means social anthropology and a willingness and thirst to know more about other fellow humans....not just snap and go....these are people and humans you're making images of....so dont treat them like innate objects.

    Using flip out LCD screens does make one more camoflaged but should not be used to sustitute the need to know/understand the subject. At best it helps but I wouldnt get addicted to it....and it wont last long either....people are beginning to wise up to photogs ability to shoot sideways and other directions via flip out twistable LCD screens
    Last edited by ed9119; 17th November 2003 at 04:47 PM.

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