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Thread: Dslr

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    Default Dslr

    DSLR? Read on the product info on bargaincity that the Minolta A1 is "SLR Digital" ... err ... since I m thinkin about getting a camera which can last me for a while ... I am actually considering a DSLR but the prices are a bit on the high side (for me). ... so if the A1 is a DSLR, i'm gonna get it. Can someone help clarify? Also, how do we actually define DLSR? How do we diff it wif cams like the C5060 or G5?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ndroo
    DSLR? Read on the product info on bargaincity that the Minolta A1 is "SLR Digital" ... err ... since I m thinkin about getting a camera which can last me for a while ... I am actually considering a DSLR but the prices are a bit on the high side (for me). ... so if the A1 is a DSLR, i'm gonna get it. Can someone help clarify? Also, how do we actually define DLSR? How do we diff it wif cams like the C5060 or G5?
    Minolta has not released any DSLR with interchangeable lens at the moment. I suggested you to look for other brands if you are into interchangeable lens. Digital cameras are roughly classified broadly under entry level, pro-consumer and of course SLR type. However, there is a lot of gray area in between all these types. Pro consumer like the G5 or the Minolta A1 has the "feel" of a Digital SLR, but the lenses are not interchangeable. Hence, you can't classified them as DSLR.

    Olympus has just realeased the E1 and Canon has it's EOS 300D. They are classifed as DSLR with their interchangeable lens abilities.


    Hope it helps!
    Danny

    P.S: Minolta has annouce it's plan to release their DSLR next year, so if you are an avid fan of Minolta, you got to wait.

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    thanks. that really helps

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    BTW, DSLR or Digital Single Lens Reflex cameras.

    Many people tend to associate SLR or DSLRs with the ability to change lens. While it's True MOST of the time.

    I believe the correct classification for DSLR or SLR, lies with the term itself.
    Single Lens Reflex.

    It means the light coming in from the lens or through the aperature is reflected by the mirror behind the lens through a prism or mirror to the viewfinder so that the photographer can see the subject as if he was looking through the lens itself.
    (Of course the image formed behind the lens is inverted and has already been reversed to form an upright image when the photographer views it through the viewfinder, Remember the pin-hole camera experiment in physics lessons?)


    Prosumer cameras like F717, Minolta's A1, Canon's G5...etc allow the photographer to see what the lens see, not through a series of mirrors but by showing the photographer what's "hitting" the CCD via the EVF (electronic View finder) and hence most manufacturers are called them DSLR-like.

    But they all do not have a mirror behind the lens and hence do not reflect the light from the lens to the viewfinder

    The Olympus E20 is an example of a DSLR which is unable to change lens.
    (which is why I say the fact that DSLRs have interchangeable lens is mostly true only)

    In layman terms, let's say, "if it aint have a mirror behind the lens it's probably not a SLR"

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    A good source to check out whether the camera is a DSLR or not is www.dpreview.com

    Click on the camera, they'll have a properties page. Under format, they'll list SLR DSLR or SLR-like, I believe the A1's tag is SLR-like.

    For the Z1, on best bargain's website, they said it's a SLR camera. And referring to dpreview, it's much more accurate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Winston
    BTW, DSLR or Digital Single Lens Reflex cameras.

    Many people tend to associate SLR or DSLRs with the ability to change lens. While it's True MOST of the time.

    I believe the correct classification for DSLR or SLR, lies with the term itself.
    Single Lens Reflex.

    It means the light coming in from the lens or through the aperature is reflected by the mirror behind the lens through a prism or mirror to the viewfinder so that the photographer can see the subject as if he was looking through the lens itself.
    (Of course the image formed behind the lens is inverted and has already been reversed to form an upright image when the photographer views it through the viewfinder, Remember the pin-hole camera experiment in physics lessons?)


    Prosumer cameras like F717, Minolta's A1, Canon's G5...etc allow the photographer to see what the lens see, not through a series of mirrors but by showing the photographer what's "hitting" the CCD via the EVF (electronic View finder) and hence most manufacturers are called them DSLR-like.

    But they all do not have a mirror behind the lens and hence do not reflect the light from the lens to the viewfinder

    The Olympus E20 is an example of a DSLR which is unable to change lens.
    (which is why I say the fact that DSLRs have interchangeable lens is mostly true only)

    In layman terms, let's say, "if it aint have a mirror behind the lens it's probably not a SLR"

    Excellent explanation......

    BTW, the Olympus E1, what mount does it use? Are the lenses limited to Olympus ones only? Or did they go the way of Fuji where the S2Pro uses the Nikon mount?

  7. #7

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    [BTW, the Olympus E1, what mount does it use? Are the lenses limited to Olympus ones only? Or did they go the way of Fuji where the S2Pro uses the Nikon mount?]

    olympus E1 uses the 4/3 System Lens Mount .

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    First, I need to thanks Winston for correcting on my reply. I have probably left that out after given some thoughts of why they called it DSLR in the first place. The concept of the SLR like you have said got to do with some mirror and prism mechanism. In the film based SLR camera, the method of solving "what you see is what you get" on what is captured on the film is by having this mirror/prism method.

    However, in digital camera, CCDs or similiar image capturing device has replace the film. This has made the method of solving "what you see is you you get" easier, because now manufacturer can make use of the CCDs to output both to the viewfinder and the storage media. For whatever reason, this is not implemented for SLR type digital camera. This is implemented for prosumer type of digital cameras like the Minolta A1.

    I would forsee a move to digital viewfinder for DSLR. This would means a more compact body without the mirror reflex mechanism. If this does happen, what do you call a digital camera with interchangeable lenses?

    Hope I have shared some thoughts to ponder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dannynys
    In digital camera, CCDs or similiar image capturing device has replace the film. This has made the method of solving "what you see is you you get" easier, because now manufacturer can make use of the CCDs to output both to the viewfinder and the storage media. For whatever reason, this is not implemented for SLR type digital camera. This is implemented for prosumer type of digital cameras like the Minolta A1.

    I would forsee a move to digital viewfinder for DSLR. This would means a more compact body without the mirror reflex mechanism. If this does happen, what do you call a digital camera with interchangeable lenses?
    I for one would prefer the good old prism viewfinder instead of a digital viewfinder. The latter means poor battery life, difficulty seeing in low light or what's in focus. I believe theoretically there would also be more noise since the CCD is "on" all the time to preview the image.

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    I would prefer an optical viewfinder as well..... digital just doesn't cut it with the poor res that the current digital viewfinders use..... and bumping up the res to true colour level will eat up your Ni-MH or Lithium batteries like there's no tomorrow.....

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    Well, I can agreed with all of you regarding the poor resolution of the CCD and the battery draining part of the monitor. I ever had my hands on a Fuji Digital SLR and I find the optical viewfinder to be very small and dim. It's hard to do manual focusing when I don't find any different when I turn the focussing grip. It's quite amazing how DSLR development has accelerated in recent years! Hope the price will keep dropping!

    Keep my finger cross,
    Danny

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    one question..
    if i m using a non digital nikon lens let say 50mm f2.0
    if it fitted on D100 it will become 75mm rt? how abt the F stop?
    will it change too?

    thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by scanman
    one question..
    if i m using a non digital nikon lens let say 50mm f2.0
    if it fitted on D100 it will become 75mm rt? how abt the F stop?
    will it change too?

    thanks

    Yes of course. f-stop is a function of focal length and aperture diameter. So since the focal length changes (while aperture diameter remains constant), then the f-stop will change accordingly to reflect the change in focal length. Correct me if I am wrong......

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    Quote Originally Posted by scanman
    one question..
    if i m using a non digital nikon lens let say 50mm f2.0
    if it fitted on D100 it will become 75mm rt? how abt the F stop?
    will it change too?
    Quote Originally Posted by TME
    Yes of course. f-stop is a function of focal length and aperture diameter. So since the focal length changes (while aperture diameter remains constant), then the f-stop will change accordingly to reflect the change in focal length. Correct me if I am wrong......
    You guys have got the field of view crop factor confused. Focal length multiplier is a misnomer. The true focal length of the lens cannot change. What changes is the field of view due to the smaller sensor size. So in effect, it is a crop factor. The f-stop will also be unchanged.

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    Yep, linse is correct, the f-stop doesn't change, just think of the FLM like cropping away a larger part of the picture to give you an enlarged center shot.

    The 75mm is just a guage of how much the FLM crops. 50%.

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    Quote Originally Posted by linse
    You guys have got the field of view crop factor confused. Focal length multiplier is a misnomer. The true focal length of the lens cannot change. What changes is the field of view due to the smaller sensor size. So in effect, it is a crop factor. The f-stop will also be unchanged.

    Hmm... yes I confused focal length and field of view......

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by dannynys
    Well, I can agreed with all of you regarding the poor resolution of the CCD and the battery draining part of the monitor. I ever had my hands on a Fuji Digital SLR and I find the optical viewfinder to be very small and dim. It's hard to do manual focusing when I don't find any different when I turn the focussing grip. It's quite amazing how DSLR development has accelerated in recent years! Hope the price will keep dropping!

    Keep my finger cross,
    Danny
    Don't find any diffiference in manual focusing???

    I am not sure if you have engaged the Manual focusing mode (on the left of the lens on the camera body, 'M', 'S' (servo), 'C' (continous) modes)

    The 'M' mode of the S2 Pro is not painted white (only the 'C' and 'S' is) and hence looks "invisible" but it's there.

    The S1 Pro only has 'M' for Manual focus and 'A' for Auto-focus.
    Since it's continous mode can only be engaged in 'Sports' mode

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    Quote Originally Posted by Winston
    Don't find any diffiference in manual focusing???

    I am not sure if you have engaged the Manual focusing mode (on the left of the lens on the camera body, 'M', 'S' (servo), 'C' (continous) modes)

    The 'M' mode of the S2 Pro is not painted white (only the 'C' and 'S' is) and hence looks "invisible" but it's there.

    The S1 Pro only has 'M' for Manual focus and 'A' for Auto-focus.
    Since it's continous mode can only be engaged in 'Sports' mode
    Well, the viewfinder screen is a bit small. I can tell you in a studio when only the modelling lights is on and you have to stare inside a dim viewfinder. It's really hard to focus just on the eyes.

    -Danny

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