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Thread: R U Guilty?

  1. #1

    Default R U Guilty?

    Got this from dpreview. Guy's name Dan

    "I'm kicking myself right now for wasting so much money figuring out what lenses I really wanted. I have a barely used 20-35mm f/3.5 - 4.5 and a brand new 35mm f/2 up for auction on eBay, and they're just two more of the lenses that I've bought and now will sell at a significant loss. Hopefully, this post will help you learn from my mistakes.

    I bought my 10d after a long time of point and shoot digital cameras and then the Olympus E-10. I never had an interchangeable lens SLR, and I knew I wanted something a little longer than the E-10.

    My first purchase was the 28-135IS, because everyone here was recommending it at the time. It is a very nice lens, but I use it only infrequently now - only when I can only travel with ONE lens. The problem is that the lens isn't as sharp as my L zooms (obviously) and its not wide enough for some indoor use.

    During the first dinner party I attended after getting my 10d and 28-135is, I realized that the 28mm (effective 45mm) wide end of the lens was too long. I was taking picture of peoples facing while trying to step back and get them from waist up.

    I then bought the 20-35mm f/3.5-4.5, because I thought it was wide enough, and it is a lot cheaper than the 17-40. Unfortunatley, I found that the 20mm sometimes wasn't wide enough, and the 35mm often wasn't long enough. Its on eBay right now, and I'm about to lose a lot of money after only owning it for a few months. Trying to buy cheaper has been expensive, as I ended up buying the 17-40 soon thereafter.

    My next lens was the 50mm f1.4. I like this lens a lot, but after getting my other lens (listed below), I felt like its sharpness wasn't worth the problems with focal length. With a 1.6 crop factor on the 10D, D30, D60 or Digital Rebel, the 50mm really isn't that useful for me indoors. That being said, I'll hold onto it for a while. I attended a wedding this weekend and I got some great ceremony shots at F/1.4 without flash that I would never have been able to do with a slower lens.

    Uphappy with how long the 50mm was, and still wanting a sharp lens, I bought a 35mm f/2. This is a great lens - VERY SHARP, but its now on eBay, and I'm about to lose a lot of money selling it because I bought the 24.70 f/2.8, discussed below.

    Wanting a long lens, I bought the 70-200 F/4L. Everyone talked about what a great bargain this lens is, and it is great outdoors in bright light. The problem is that, on a cloudy day, its too slow. I found that I didn't use it much because the f/4, even with a high ISO, often wouldn't allow me handhold without getting shakes. At the short end, however, I loved this lens for portraits. The lens is incredibly sharp, and its a bargain for a great L lens, but if its too slow, the price really didn't matter, since I wasn't using it.

    Next came the 24-70L F/2.8, and it is great. It is very big, but the quality is fantastic - it feels great, and its very sharp. I find myself unhappy with the results from the 28-135is because I think the 24-70 is significantly better. I also like the wide end of this lens much more, because I find that 24mm typically is wide enough, while 28mm wasn't wide enough.

    I then got in on the Dell deal on the 70-200IS, and I immediately sold the 70-200F4. After only a few days with the IS, I knew that it was a much more useful lens, because it was hand holdable at slower shutter speeds b/c of the IS. Thus, I sold the 70-200 F/4 two weeks ago on eBay and again lost a fair amount of money.

    Just this week, I was hired to do a small wedding, and I decided the 20-35mm really wasn't wide enough or sharp enough, so I bought the 17-40mm F/4. I REALLY hope I don't regret this decision. I lusted after the 16-35mm f/2.8, but I decided that I valued the extra 5mm on the long end more than the extra stop, because I typically use the wide angle lens indoors with a flash, and I found my 20-35mm would have been better if it was longer.

    So, after a lot of mistakes, I am keeping (for now):

    17-40mm f/4 - the wide angle indoor choice
    24-70 f/2.8 - walk around lens when not too heavy
    28-135is - when i can only bring one lens in a small bag
    50mm f/1.4 - when I know I'm taking available light shots indoors
    70-200 IS f/2.8 - for anything long, when I don't mind a big camera bag.


    It wouldn't surprise me if I get rid of the 28-135mm and maybe even the 50mm within the next 6 months or so. They are my least used lenses now, and it would leave me with just the three most useful for my photography.

    When I first started with my 10D, I couldn't believe that some people actually owned the 17-40, 24-70 and 70-200IS L zooms, as it seemed like such a huge investment. Now, I wish I had thought more about it and not tried to find cheaper replacements like the 35mm f/2, 20-35 f3.5-f4.5 or 70-200 f4.

    The nice thing about canon glass is that it holds most of its value for years to come. When you sell it within a few months, however, you take almost the same hit you would take if you sold it after a few years.

    Good luck to all, and I hope someone can learn from my expensive mistakes.

    - Dan "

  2. #2

    Default

    sounds familiar. To summarise the long article for the benefit of others:

    every newbie who buys a Canon DSLR should buy the following lenses

    16-35L (not the 17-40L that guy is wrong and will eventually upgrade to it)
    24-70L
    70-200L IS

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erwinx
    sounds familiar. To summarise the long article for the benefit of others:

    every newbie who buys a Canon DSLR should buy the following lenses

    16-35L (not the 17-40L that guy is wrong and will eventually upgrade to it)
    24-70L
    70-200L IS

    I agree with erwinx except for the 16-35L

  4. #4

    Default

    For the kind of money that this guys has lost, he could possibly have spent the lost money, and the money he is about to loose on the depreciation of the 10D, on a manual Nikon or Contax SLR setup with two or three primes, and have lots of film to go with it too.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erwinx
    sounds familiar. To summarise the long article for the benefit of others:

    every newbie who buys a Canon DSLR should buy the following lenses

    16-35L (not the 17-40L that guy is wrong and will eventually upgrade to it)
    24-70L
    70-200L IS
    luckily i got 2 out of 3. will look into the 24-70L next year.
    but these 3 might be useful -

    28-105 or 28-135 (for everyday use)
    ef 100mm macro (for macro)
    ef 300 or 400 + 1.4xTC (for nature shots)

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erwinx
    sounds familiar. To summarise the long article for the benefit of others:

    every newbie who buys a Canon DSLR should buy the following lenses

    16-35L (not the 17-40L that guy is wrong and will eventually upgrade to it)
    24-70L
    70-200L IS
    Nah, I got the 17-40. Fantastic lens.

    The rest I agree.

    BTW I hardly sell off the lenses I accumulate, so I don't suffer losses...
    Last edited by StreetShooter; 15th November 2003 at 10:10 AM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erwinx
    sounds familiar. To summarise the long article for the benefit of others:

    every newbie who buys a Canon DSLR should buy the following lenses

    16-35L (not the 17-40L that guy is wrong and will eventually upgrade to it)
    24-70L
    70-200L IS
    Not for me at the moment. My photography skills and frequency of use do not justify an L lens, yet.

  8. #8

    Default

    Oh boy... it sure sounds familiar! I've been buying things which are clearly second-rate to what I truly wanted, no thanks to my limited bank account. Soon I realize that I do get what I pay for (most of the time at least), so now I try my darn best to resist buying a cheaper substitute until I can save up to get the one I truly desire.

    This is especially true for lenses. I've purchased third party lenses because I couldn't justify spending so much for the fast original lenses. Except for one of the lens, most of the rest were just stop gap measures. End of the day... wasted money on selling the lenses to upgrade to what I really wanted.

    Of course... the counter-argument would be that I am taking pictures now with the "alternative" lens while saving for the upgrade. If I'd waited till I can afford my desired lens, I would be taking zero pictures. And of course, second-rate lenses would still deliver much superior imagery than no lenses.

    Interesting that it happens to most of us. Now that I came some way in photography and accumulated a significant amount of equipment, I guess I'm suffering what some call "reductionist" syndrome. You begin to want to sell your equipment to focus on what the gist of your photography needs. Hahahah! Truly the circle of life!

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