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Thread: Aperture

  1. #1
    Member Tantalize's Avatar
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    Default Aperture

    I've got a headache trying to understand aperture of the camera. I understand that the lowest aperture gives you a blur in the background of the object (greater DOF).

    So do we only use the lowest aperture when we are taking still shots and not to focus on the background?

    How about when we are taking picture of a night scenery? Do we take in high aperture?

    I know these question sounds silly, but I need to understand this in order to learn more about my camera. Thanks guys.

  2. #2
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Photography Notes For Newbies

    read post #5 and #6, if don't understand, ask again.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Aperture

    i believe its about how u want your picture to turn out.. since i think u understand DOF, when taking the picture, ask yourself.. what u wanna focus on..
    personally i think a sharp back ground might draw attention away from your main subject.

    if u are talking about landscaping night shots.. then using a small aperture/High F-stop is fine, since most probably you'll be using a tripod.. shutter speed is of no concern to you..

    i hope it helps..
    Huh? What Goes Here..?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by Tantalize View Post
    I've got a headache trying to understand aperture of the camera. I understand that the lowest aperture gives you a blur in the background of the object (greater DOF).

    Yes, you are right to say that lowest aperture (widest opening) produces greater DOF.

    So do we only use the lowest aperture when we are taking still shots and not to focus on the background?
    Not true. It depends on your composition. Sometimes you might want a sharp backgroud, then use higher aperture (smaller opening).

    How about when we are taking picture of a night scenery? Do we take in high aperture?
    Not really true. But from my understanding, smaller aperture (around F8) will give you sharper image. But of course, lenght of exposure will be longer. Using wider aperture will need less exposure time. This of course will also have to depend on your ISO setting.

    I know these question sounds silly, but I need to understand this in order to learn more about my camera. Thanks guys.
    No is not, we are all here to learn

    Have fun with you cam
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  5. #5
    Member Tantalize's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    Photography Notes For Newbies

    read post #5 and #6, if don't understand, ask again.
    Yup read that. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tzzw86 View Post
    i believe its about how u want your picture to turn out.. since i think u understand DOF, when taking the picture, ask yourself.. what u wanna focus on..
    personally i think a sharp back ground might draw attention away from your main subject.

    if u are talking about landscaping night shots.. then using a small aperture/High F-stop is fine, since most probably you'll be using a tripod.. shutter speed is of no concern to you..

    i hope it helps..
    Will try that out tomorrow

    Quote Originally Posted by romeo tango View Post
    No is not, we are all here to learn

    Have fun with you cam
    Thanks, it is indeed a great learning place.

    One more question if you guys don't mind, if I set my ISO to lowest, aperture to around 16, and speed to very slow, it will not give higher noise will it?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by Tantalize View Post

    One more question if you guys don't mind, if I set my ISO to lowest, aperture to around 16, and speed to very slow, it will not give higher noise will it?

    How long will your exposure be ? From my understanding, there are basically 2 types of noise, High ISO and Long exposure.

    For High ISO noises, quite standard that once it reaches certain number, noise will form (dependent on cam make and model)

    As for Long exposure, you will have to try it out on how long you can go before noise sits in for each ISO.
    Tangfolio, 9mm; CZ75 Shadow, 9mm; S&W 686, .38

  7. #7
    Member Tantalize's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by romeo tango View Post
    How long will your exposure be ? From my understanding, there are basically 2 types of noise, High ISO and Long exposure.

    For High ISO noises, quite standard that once it reaches certain number, noise will form (dependent on cam make and model)

    As for Long exposure, you will have to try it out on how long you can go before noise sits in for each ISO.
    Thanks. Exposure I might go for around 30 seconds. Haven't try out yet, will post up the image once I took them tomorrow Will try take few shots to check if I do have enough exposure on the images

  8. #8

    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by Tantalize View Post
    I've got a headache trying to understand aperture of the camera. I understand that the lowest aperture gives you a blur in the background of the object (greater DOF).
    WRONG.
    Alpha

  9. #9
    Member Tantalize's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    WRONG.
    Mind to elaborate more about this? Thanks.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by Tantalize View Post
    Mind to elaborate more about this? Thanks.
    "I understand that the lowest aperture gives you a blur in the background of the object (greater DOF)."

    1. Lowest aperture = sharp foreground and backgroud.
    2. Largerst aperture = blurred background and SMALLER DOF.


    Read the photography notes for newbies. It explains things nicely. Also, there are quite a few good books in the library.
    Alpha

  11. #11
    Member Tantalize's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    "I understand that the lowest aperture gives you a blur in the background of the object (greater DOF)."

    1. Lowest aperture = sharp foreground and backgroud.
    2. Largerst aperture = blurred background and SMALLER DOF.


    Read the photography notes for newbies. It explains things nicely. Also, there are quite a few good books in the library.
    Dear Rashkae, just noticed that I've misquote the technical term for lowest and largest aperture. I've took the numbers in the camera literally, when it should be the size of the aperture on the camera.

  12. #12
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Aperture is expressed as F-stop, e.g. F2.8 or f/2.8. The smaller the F-stop number (or f/value), the larger the lens opening (aperture).
    taken from
    What Is... Aperture? - Digital Photography Tutorial - Photoxels




    A lower f-number denotes a greater aperture opening which allows more light to reach the film or image sensor.
    taken from
    Aperture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    if you mention lower number aperture, you are reffering to smaller in number aperture (bigger the hole).

    but when you say lower aperture, you are not specify which ends you are referring, which is very confusing to yourself and everybody. it is better to use the term of LARGE aperture or SMALL aperture instead.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  13. #13
    Member Tantalize's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    taken from
    What Is... Aperture? - Digital Photography Tutorial - Photoxels




    taken from
    Aperture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    if you mention lower number aperture, you are reffering to smaller in number aperture (bigger the hole).

    but when you say lower aperture, you are not specify which ends you are referring, which is very confusing to yourself and everybody. it is better to use the term of LARGE aperture or SMALL aperture instead.
    Noted Thanks

  14. #14

    Default Re: Aperture

    the f number is a ratio... it tells u a few things, including the depth of field (how much depth of acceptable sharpness in the object space, bigger f number means larger space), size of the aperture ( bigger f number means smaller size ) ...

  15. #15

    Default Re: Aperture

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    "I understand that the lowest aperture gives you a blur in the background of the object (greater DOF)."

    1. Lowest aperture = sharp foreground and backgroud.
    2. Largerst aperture = blurred background and SMALLER DOF.


    Read the photography notes for newbies. It explains things nicely. Also, there are quite a few good books in the library.
    Should it be Smallest vs Largest? Lowest vs highest? Lowest is never associated with largest...
    Last edited by bomby929; 11th May 2009 at 12:51 PM.
    Nikon D90

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    Default Re: Aperture

    When you say big apperture, it means low F-number, like F2.8 and below.
    When you say small apperture, it means large F-number, like F9 and above, can go upto like F22
    In between I would say they are medium apperture.

  17. #17
    Member Tantalize's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture

    Thanks all Guess I've understood aperture more or less

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