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Thread: Dental photo records

  1. #1

    Default Dental photo records

    Prior to fitting braces on a paitent we take full photo records, full face shot head on, side on and then close up of teeth. Why does everyone recommend a 105 mm lens? Its fine for the close ups but we need to stand the other side of the room for full face. Any ideas why?


    TIA

  2. #2

    Default Re: Dental photo records

    perspective. 105mm is a long focal length and thus narrow field of view, so you'll need to step back in order to frame larger objects in.

  3. #3
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dental photo records

    Quote Originally Posted by Lupla View Post
    Prior to fitting braces on a paitent we take full photo records, full face shot head on, side on and then close up of teeth. Why does everyone recommend a 105 mm lens? Its fine for the close ups but we need to stand the other side of the room for full face. Any ideas why?


    TIA
    maybe many people don't know the room are so small nowadays.....

    anyway, if you are using a 60mm, when doing a close up, you will be very close to the patients, they might be very uncomfortable to have someone taking photos so up close.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Dental photo records

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Chan View Post
    perspective. 105mm is a long focal length and thus narrow field of view, so you'll need to step back in order to frame larger objects in.
    I understand that, but I'm reading different forums and people are recommending the 105mm instead of the 60mm for instance. But there is no explaination why 105? Reckon it's got to do with the light source? Thanks for the fast reply

  5. #5

    Default Re: Dental photo records

    In the past, two specific lenses for close-up medical work were the Medical Nikkor 120 and 200mm. Specialised, these lenses were fitted with their own macro ring flash in the front of the lens, as well as a specal set of filters.

    I suspect that on a crop body (not specified), the closest you could get to those two previous medical lenses is the existing 105mm micro Nikkor (105x1.5). I am assuming that you're using Nikon since you mentioned 105mm.

    What Catchlights said, not only would clients get really uncomfortable with the photographer going in close, but also because of perspectives for technical accuracy (going in very very close with something like a native 60mm would likely induce distortions - not good for medical record and reference purposes), and for the operator's own safety. Some patients bite!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Dental photo records

    o sry, misunderstood your qns..

  7. #7
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dental photo records

    I shot before, and using a 105mm on DX body, shooting full face need a little more room, close up is fine, but I would not want to use a 60mm to shoot close up...
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  8. #8

    Default Re: Dental photo records

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    I shot before, and using a 105mm on DX body, shooting full face need a little more room, close up is fine, but I would not want to use a 60mm to shoot close up...
    Especially with many Singaporeans LURRRVVEEE for sambal belachan, chicken rice chilli with loads of garlic and ginger!

  9. #9

    Default Re: Dental photo records

    Hahahahahahaha funny!!!

  10. #10

    Default Re: Dental photo records

    It can be, but not when there might be any chance of blood or body fluids spurting or anything like that, which is a reality that happens once in awhile.

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