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Thread: PS cropping with ratio

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Royce
    In PS 7.0 there is no option, it is implicitly fixed image size. The marque tool has 3 options (specified in the Style box): Normal, Fixed Aspect Ratio, Fixed Size.

    With the Crop Tool, if you enter 3 for width and 2 for height, when you drag the crop selection, the selection will be have a fixed aspect ratio of 3:2, but if you press enter to do the crop, your image will be 3 x 2 pixels in size. Not exactly the desired outcome.

    Have you tried it on PS 7.0?
    hmm. my ps7 crop tool works as it should (meaning- it crops my selection). you sure it's not a bug on your program?

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poon
    hmm. my ps7 crop tool works as it should (meaning- it crops my selection). you sure it's not a bug on your program?

    Poon, I think you misunderstood what Royce meant. He is not saying
    that the crop tool cannot crop. He is saying that you can't crop according to
    ratio you want EASILY. The key point here is we Photoshop to be able to AUTOMATICALLY constraint the selection we made to a certain ratio - e.g. 3:2.
    It can be done with the marquee tool, but not the crop tool.

    As I mentioned above, I found a workaround :

    First use the marquee tool to fixed aspect ratio select the area you want.

    Now, the trick is change the tool to crop and click Image|Crop - and you have
    a cropped image based on your previous marquee selection.


    Can you try to see if the above works on Photoshop 7.0 ?

    It works on 5.0 and 6.0.

  3. #23

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    Yes kst it works in PS7, this method is wat tomcat and togu posted earlier in the thread.

    The Crop tool can also crop to a 3:2 ratio by specifying 3 inch by 2 inch. In fact isn't 3 pixel to 2 pixel a 3:2 ratio too? But this 3:2 ratio is different to the fixed aspect ratio of the marquee tool when in use. The prob is using this crop method we are changing the document size and more importantly, the resolution. To maintain the resolution we can specify the resolution in the crop options, but then this poses another problem. The resulting image is upsampled or downsampled, which is not what we want. We then have to change the image size again to wat we want. Both the crop and marquee method involve 2 steps, therefore it really depends on wat u r comfortable with.

    The way I see it the only 1 step process is to determine the image size u eventually want in pixels and enter it according in the crop options. If u just wanna crop to a fixed ratio w/o any resizing, then the marquee/crop method is the best method.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuRfTeC
    why do all of you need to crop to 3:2? isit because of the 4R size which is 6 inch by 4 inch.
    if there is a size that is already 3:2 in the digital camera... then do we still need to crop the picture...?
    For 3:2, yes, it's for printing 4R or Super 8R (12"x8")

    No doubt in an ideal situation, shots are captured with the exact composition and framing as desired. However there will be times, for example, when shots may had been composed too wide with lots of irrelevant detail surrounding the subject and cropping will help add punch to the picture. Or maybe just to crop that somebody you hate away from a group photo. :P


    Quote Originally Posted by SuRfTeC
    anyone can give a general picture size that is normally used to develop 4r digital printouts? (in pixel measurement eg: 2288 by 1520)
    To print a 4R picture @ 300dpi will need 1800 pixels (6"x300dpi) by 1200 pixels (4"x300dpi).

  5. #25

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    Still no comment from any PhotoShop CS users. I hope they've added an aspect ratio to the Crop Tool that doesn't invoke any image resampling (ie. merged marque and image|crop into one step).

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Royce
    Still no comment from any PhotoShop CS users. I hope they've added an aspect ratio to the Crop Tool that doesn't invoke any image resampling (ie. merged marque and image|crop into one step).
    No, PS CS also does not have this function.

  7. #27

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    Bummer. Thanks for the info.

  8. #28

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    Hi everyone,

    In the crop tool, you can specify the aspect ratio, say 3 in (W) and 2 in (H), but keep the resolution box blank. That way, you get to crop with ratio, but no resampling of the image. The DPI of course will change, but that's because you are now specifying printing size of 3 inch and 2 inch instead of you default size of image.

    For 4R print, you should use 4 in and 6 in, do your crop, and the resulting DPI will give you an indication whether you have enough resolution for that print.

    This is Photoshop 7.0, but I don't suppose it changed in CS. Someone correct me if I am wrong?

    Francis

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by fryap
    Hi everyone,

    In the crop tool, you can specify the aspect ratio, say 3 in (W) and 2 in (H), but keep the resolution box blank. That way, you get to crop with ratio, but no resampling of the image. The DPI of course will change, but that's because you are now specifying printing size of 3 inch and 2 inch instead of you default size of image.

    For 4R print, you should use 4 in and 6 in, do your crop, and the resulting DPI will give you an indication whether you have enough resolution for that print.

    This is Photoshop 7.0, but I don't suppose it changed in CS. Someone correct me if I am wrong?

    Francis


    That's provided you set your units in inches. But guess it's the best way to get a real 3R, 4R crop fast.

    * togu clap clap clap

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by fryap
    Hi everyone,

    In the crop tool, you can specify the aspect ratio, say 3 in (W) and 2 in (H), but keep the resolution box blank. That way, you get to crop with ratio, but no resampling of the image. The DPI of course will change, but that's because you are now specifying printing size of 3 inch and 2 inch instead of you default size of image.

    For 4R print, you should use 4 in and 6 in, do your crop, and the resulting DPI will give you an indication whether you have enough resolution for that print.

    This is Photoshop 7.0, but I don't suppose it changed in CS. Someone correct me if I am wrong?

    Francis
    Its PPI when we talking about images on a monitor.

    You are right in your post.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by fryap
    Hi everyone,

    In the crop tool, you can specify the aspect ratio, say 3 in (W) and 2 in (H), but keep the resolution box blank. That way, you get to crop with ratio, but no resampling of the image. The DPI of course will change, but that's because you are now specifying printing size of 3 inch and 2 inch instead of you default size of image.

    For 4R print, you should use 4 in and 6 in, do your crop, and the resulting DPI will give you an indication whether you have enough resolution for that print.

    This is Photoshop 7.0, but I don't suppose it changed in CS. Someone correct me if I am wrong?

    Francis
    isit better if we set the resolution..? like to 300 pixels/inch?

    does this affect the picture if its going to be printed out?

    Is there any recommended PPI to use for pictures that are going to be developed out?

    cheers...

  12. #32

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    Hi SuRfTeC,

    Sorry, I don't have a definite answer. It depends on the size of your output (4R, 8R, or larger?), the printer (inkjet or minilab?), the camera (DSLR or P&S?), the type of the picture (landscape/portrait?) etc.

    For me, at 4R or 8R using my Ixus 400, there is no difference if I keep the picture at 300PPI or not, using the Fuji Frontier or my Canon i950. I let the printer do the interpolation work. For bigger sizes or people with more discerning eyes, the majority opinion seem to be to interpolate up to the native resolution of the printer (300 DPI for Fuji Frontier) using some third party Photoshop plug-ins or Qimage.

    Here is an opinion of someone more experienced:

    Luminous Landscape

    Hope that helps.



    Francis
    Last edited by fryap; 19th November 2003 at 02:34 PM.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by fryap
    Hi SuRfTeC,

    Sorry, I don't have a definite answer. It depends on the size of your output (4R, 8R, or larger?), the printer (inkjet or minilab?), the camera (DSLR or P&S?), the type of the picture (landscape/portrait?) etc.

    For me, at 4R or 8R using my Ixus 400, there is no difference if I keep the picture at 300PPI or not, using the Fuji Frontier or my Canon i950. I let the printer do the interpolation work. For bigger sizes or people with more discerning eyes, the majority opinion seem to be to interpolate up to the native resolution of the printer (300 DPI for Fuji Frontier) using some third party Photoshop plug-ins or Qimage.

    Here is an opinion of someone more experienced:

    Luminous Landscape

    Hope that helps.



    Francis
    Thanks fryap,

    appreciate the website you provided... but i still got doubts about interpolation... what is that..? what it means...??

  14. #34

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    Hi SuRfTeC,

    Maybe another website can explain better

    DPreview

    Hope that helps.


    Francis

  15. #35
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    thanks again fryap,

    understand whats the meaning of interpolation liao.

    so normally in PS will we do the interpolation?? if we do..>?
    how to go about doing it?

    thanks...

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuRfTeC
    thanks again fryap,

    understand whats the meaning of interpolation liao.

    so normally in PS will we do the interpolation?? if we do..>?
    how to go about doing it?

    thanks...
    PS does the interpolation - when you change the pixel size of an image (on image size dialog, Resample Image is checked).

  17. #37
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    Erm... can i ask what is Qimage??

    heard quite a lot of CSer using Qimage...but don't know what is it and what it does.

    can anyone advice?

    cheers

  18. #38
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    hi,

    what if my pixels for 4R is less than the 1800 x 1200? does that mean that my print out would be of unacceptable quality or resolution?

    thanks.......

    Quote Originally Posted by Noir
    For 3:2, yes, it's for printing 4R or Super 8R (12"x8")

    No doubt in an ideal situation, shots are captured with the exact composition and framing as desired. However there will be times, for example, when shots may had been composed too wide with lots of irrelevant detail surrounding the subject and cropping will help add punch to the picture. Or maybe just to crop that somebody you hate away from a group photo. :P




    To print a 4R picture @ 300dpi will need 1800 pixels (6"x300dpi) by 1200 pixels (4"x300dpi).

  19. #39
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    hi fryap,

    i did what u mentioned below, using 4 in by 6 in to crop my image. the final cropped image has file size of 2.3MB whereas the original image is only 1.3MB. is this normal?

    thanks........

    Quote Originally Posted by fryap
    Hi everyone,

    In the crop tool, you can specify the aspect ratio, say 3 in (W) and 2 in (H), but keep the resolution box blank. That way, you get to crop with ratio, but no resampling of the image. The DPI of course will change, but that's because you are now specifying printing size of 3 inch and 2 inch instead of you default size of image.

    For 4R print, you should use 4 in and 6 in, do your crop, and the resulting DPI will give you an indication whether you have enough resolution for that print.

    This is Photoshop 7.0, but I don't suppose it changed in CS. Someone correct me if I am wrong?

    Francis

  20. #40

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    Hi plinius,

    Instead of worrying whether you have enough pixels, just try it out. The proof is in the final printed image. Don't let the technical discussion about resolution deter you from printing your photos.

    I have had decent 4R from my older 1.3 Mpixel Fuji camera. In my newer Ixus 400, I blow up my pictures to 8R routinely and the resolution is at 180 PPI. Looks good in prints. Will it be better at 300 PPI? Probably it will be technically clearer. But the essence of a photo wouldn't change one bit, unless all you are printing are pics of rulers and resolution charts

    As for your query about why your 1.3 Mb Jpeg file (I assume), it could be that your camera saved the image at a higher compression, but you saved your in a higher quality setting instead. Not knowing your camera mode or post processing workflow, that's my guess. I had experienced cropping a 1.3Mb Jpeg in PS and the resulting saved file was 2.2Mb.


    Francis

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