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Thread: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

  1. #1

    Default Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

    Hey there, i recently purchased a Canon EOS 450D to learn photography. While my initial planned interest is on close-up objects, i was at Plaza Singapura yesterday and came across this Monopoly championship event outside. With my basic 18-55mm kit lens, I decided to see what I can capture for experience's sake.

    Positioning was difficult. It was essentially a barricaded area maybe around 15x15m or 20x20m. From where I could stand (at the fence) with a max of 55mm and f/5.6, I found it hard to hone in on the table action or individual facial expressions of participants. (I will post some photos later as there is a forum-imposed limit)

    My questions are mostly on two matters,
    • For an event of such distance, what is the typical lens type to capture people or the table when I cannot close in, and have to stand 5-15m away? 85mm, 135mm?
    • My friend told me in photograhy, getting the shot is half the battle. The second half is post processing. I found that to be somewhat true; as I review the shots I captured and pondered what can or cannot be salvaged. So photography skills appears to have the need to be married with photo-editing skills. How much time do you spend learning to capture versus learning to edit? This is a subjective question, but i just want to read your personal perspectives, and experience on these.
    • During photo-editing, I found it sometimes helps to reduce the saturation, as it appears to pronounce the theme of the photo more. Are my eyes playing tricks on me?
    Last edited by icelava; 5th April 2009 at 11:54 AM. Reason: grammar

  2. #2

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing










  3. #3

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing










  4. #4

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing






  5. #5

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

    Prime lens are great in that they are fast, but a 70-200mm would be more versatile, it depends on your budget and expectations.

    There is no generic lens to cover all occasions, but here is one really rough guide for you to refer to if you really wish to have an idea of the relation between the estimated distance, subject size and lens.

    On the point of post editing and using your eyes as a gauge, one often overlooked step is the need to properly calibrate the monitor in the first place.
    Last edited by ahbian; 5th April 2009 at 11:23 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

    Quote Originally Posted by icelava View Post



    These two are great takes!

    As for the lenses, I suggest live with the present one for now and then take an assessment of your pics a month from now. It'll show you a focal length with a higher percentage of usage, according to your style. Get that as your baseline and start your purchasing decision from there.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

    Quote Originally Posted by ahbian View Post
    Prime lens are great in that they are fast, but a 70-200mm would be more versatile, it depends on your budget and expectations.

    There is no generic lens to cover all occasions, but here is one really rough guide for you to refer to if you really wish to have an idea of the relation between the estimated distance, subject size and lens.
    Thanks, i will look up and see what figures i can get out of that later.

    On the point of post editing and using your eyes as a gauge, one often overlooked step is the need to properly calibrate the monitor in the first place.
    I did use the calibration software provided by the freebie package when i bought the cam, but after following its instructions, it turned my monitors green. :-) I quickly uninstalled it (which was also problematic as it was an old-generation installer and I use x64 Windows Vista)
    Last edited by icelava; 5th April 2009 at 12:06 PM. Reason: quote

  8. #8

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

    Quote Originally Posted by cy_j View Post
    These two are great takes!
    Those two particular shots I increased the saturation unlike the others which I decreased. I felt that it was too distracting to have too much colour in the other photos, but yes for these photos I felt they need more colour.

    The poster shot is actually horribly cropped - it was a vertical shot which I trimmed into a seemingly horizontal - thus a loss of resolution. I bumped up the contrast as well.

    As for the lenses, I suggest live with the present one for now and then take an assessment of your pics a month from now. It'll show you a focal length with a higher percentage of usage, according to your style. Get that as your baseline and start your purchasing decision from there.
    Oh, most of my captures will probably be with my 50mm prime and not the kit zoom lens. :-) In fact i am considering getting a EF 35mm f/2 because of the close ups I want to take.

    I am thinking ahead in the future though, if i come across such a distance event what lens at the opposite side of the spectrum should i utilise.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

    Quote Originally Posted by ahbian View Post
    Prime lens are great in that they are fast, but a 70-200mm would be more versatile, it depends on your budget and expectations.
    This morning i had a chance to try out a colleague's EF 70-200mm L lens. it appears to be the appropriate model for this variable range.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Covering event from 5-15m, and post processing

    Quote Originally Posted by icelava View Post
    My questions are mostly on two matters,
    • For an event of such distance, what is the typical lens type to capture people or the table when I cannot close in, and have to stand 5-15m away? 85mm, 135mm?
    • My friend told me in photograhy, getting the shot is half the battle. The second half is post processing. I found that to be somewhat true; as I review the shots I captured and pondered what can or cannot be salvaged. So photography skills appears to have the need to be married with photo-editing skills. How much time do you spend learning to capture versus learning to edit? This is a subjective question, but i just want to read your personal perspectives, and experience on these.
    • During photo-editing, I found it sometimes helps to reduce the saturation, as it appears to pronounce the theme of the photo more. Are my eyes playing tricks on me?
    it depends on what perspective you want, there is no one focal length fits all solution, and people tend to have different requirements, a mixture of wide to telephoto can all be used, and will be used, and should be used to great effect.

    for events, how much processing can one do? nothing more than the ordinary, if you ask me, perhaps a stronger grounding with flash lighting might help, but i am doubtful as to how useful post processing strengths can be when processing event photographs, to be honest.

    black and white or selective color , or desaturated can be used to great effect, but you should be clear as to whether you are just being WOWED by the photograph looking different. a good way to tell is to just place the two photographs side by side- one with full colour, and the other with less colour. does what you intend to show stand out more? be honest with yourself, and you will soon be better able to tell which process and path to take when editing photographs. cheers.

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