Page 1 of 8 1236 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 160

Thread: Self-Assembled PC

  1. #1

    Default Self-Assembled PC

    i'm planning to get a new computer to replace my current P4. used for very long le and PSU is making a very loud noise. fed up with a non-gaming com and dun want to waste money to replace the parts, so might as well replace the whole system. i've been looking around the price lists for parts and i've come up with this:

    ASUS P5Q-EM G45 w/VGA+Sound+G.Lan+1394 HDMI (DDR2 board) + INTEL Core2 Quad Q9550 1333MHZ (2.83GHz) 12MB L2 $652

    Kingston DDR2-667 2GBx2 $62

    SEAGATE Barracuda 7200.10 -320GB- (16MB) Serial ATA-II $74

    CM ExtremePower Plus 500W - 3Y $82

    Samsung SATA 22XDVDRW - int. $35

    CoolerMaster CM690 Black ATX $129

    Asustek GF9600GT HDMI 512MB $169

    total would be abt $1203.

    i've 'assembled' this parts list from various brochures and i just treat this as a rough guide as i intend to go down next week to confirm and then buy the various components.

    i find that the price for this kind of specs is quite reasonable. but would like to seek the advice of fellow CSers who have built their own PCs before. For eg wad to look out for when doing such a build and any shops that i die die must avoid (SLS). Also, if you do spot any potential conflicting hardware, do let me know.

    If you have any interesting 'stories' that happen when buying such a computer/assembling your own, do share with us.
    Kodak Easyshare C875
    flickr

  2. #2
    Senior Member dennisc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Freezing Upp Thomson/Mandai!
    Posts
    2,008

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Easier to just let them assemble. Buy the whole package, I've bought for someone an almost similar specs (except the motherboard but its also Asus) at 400+SGD, free hardware installation, xp installation (with your own serial). Save cost save trouble. I bought it from a shop at 4th floor, corner or sth... runs like a champ.
    Last edited by dennisc; 1st April 2009 at 01:49 AM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    been diy-ing my own com for 10+ years. have a flexible budget as stuff can be out of stock at the shop that sell them the cheapest and u have to get it from another shop that sell more expensive.

    if u get more items from 1 shop, u can ask for discount

    diy price list for cpu and motherboard bundle sometime come with catch that u need to buy ram from them also else the bundle price is not that cheap

    so far i been buying my main parts from fuwell, bell, video pro these shops may not always have the cheapest parts but they do allow u to bargain abit if u almost buy the entire system from them.

    my current system is mostly bought from fuwell, the guy discounted my casing and power unit as i got 80% of my parts from them
    D80/D700 18-135/17-50/14-24/24-70/70-200/70-300/50/60 SB600/900

  4. #4
    Senior Member NovJoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    ~Sunny Little Island~
    Posts
    5,651

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Quote Originally Posted by raptor1988 View Post
    i'm planning to get a new computer to replace my current P4. used for very long le and PSU is making a very loud noise. fed up with a non-gaming com and dun want to waste money to replace the parts, so might as well replace the whole system. i've been looking around the price lists for parts and i've come up with this:

    ASUS P5Q-EM G45 w/VGA+Sound+G.Lan+1394 HDMI (DDR2 board) + INTEL Core2 Quad Q9550 1333MHZ (2.83GHz) 12MB L2 $652

    Kingston DDR2-667 2GBx2 $62

    SEAGATE Barracuda 7200.10 -320GB- (16MB) Serial ATA-II $74

    CM ExtremePower Plus 500W - 3Y $82

    Samsung SATA 22XDVDRW - int. $35

    CoolerMaster CM690 Black ATX $129

    Asustek GF9600GT HDMI 512MB $169

    total would be abt $1203.

    i've 'assembled' this parts list from various brochures and i just treat this as a rough guide as i intend to go down next week to confirm and then buy the various components.

    i find that the price for this kind of specs is quite reasonable. but would like to seek the advice of fellow CSers who have built their own PCs before. For eg wad to look out for when doing such a build and any shops that i die die must avoid (SLS). Also, if you do spot any potential conflicting hardware, do let me know.

    If you have any interesting 'stories' that happen when buying such a computer/assembling your own, do share with us.
    I have been building D.I.Y. PCs for the last 8 years and hope that I can help you out on this.

    You can visit PC Themes or Fuwell. Fuwell's slightly expensive in some of the hardware but it is still a reputable shop.

    As for your parts, why go for G45? Go for a P45 standard ATX as it should be cheaper since G45 comes with onboard HDMI which tends to be more expensive. Since you are intending to get a dedicated 9600GT with HDMI out, P45 will be a better option than G45. Do check in ASUS site if the board supports your CPU version natively without the need of BIOS flashing. If BIOS flashing needs to be involved, get the shop to do it before you buy if they offer it as a bundle. If the shop don't bundle the board and processor together and will not flash unless you pay, get a compatible processor which can go with the board natively without the need to flash. Not many applications will be able to use all 4 cores on a Quad. Usually a Duo will handle well.

    RAM wise, I suggest that you go for at least 800MHz from Kingston ValueRAM. If you want to go for other brands, make sure that you don't end up getting the factory overclocked "800MHz" or "1066MHz" RAMs where they are in actual having a lower frequency by made but overclocked by the manufacturer and claiming the overclocked speed as the "maximum speed".

    PSU, instead of the Coolermaster CM Extreme 500watts, I suggest that you throw in more money to get at least a Silverstone 650watts or FSP 700watts. Coolermaster, I'll stick with their chassis instead of PSU. Many tends to ignore the importance of a good and reliable PSU and eventually have their whole system fried when the PSU decides to spike and give up.

    What monitor will you be using or you are connecting to a TV?

    Hope the above helps.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Ok being building PC for a while and here a little into what I think of your list of hardwares.

    The first thing will be what your need in a PC is for. If you are not running thread intensive stuff ie, video encoding, virtualisation, a quad core CPU may be a little overkill. For general gaming and photoshoping work etc, I would recommend a faster CPU then a quad. Use the mana saved and get another HDD will in fact help too.

    Here what I'll do with two HDD.
    Partition HDD_1 with about 30-40GB for the OS + Application software. Leave the rest for storage and backup.
    Partition HDD_2 with about 15-20GB for the Window swap files + PS swap and leave the rest for storage.

    So far your hardware look ok. Being getting from SLS (Bell, Fuwell, Laser etc) so far they do give discount for items if you get most of the stuff from them.

    Have fun shopping ard.~

  6. #6

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Also, any reason why you're going for a Q9550? Unless you do a lot of video editing you're better off getting a dual core. If you're mainly looking for a gaming PC you're better off going for a lower clocked dual-core and a higher end graphic card. Do you plan to use vista or xp? If you're using vista get at least 4gb ram. Ram is cheap.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    to bro NovJoe,
    i think the Asus P5Q series of board does support the Q9550 processor. yea. i agree that it better to get a good PSU. if get a cheap one and it goes pear shaped, my system also die. Going to use my 17 itch samsung syncmaster 753DFX for the time being as i'm pretty maxed out on my savings for the build. come june then get a 22" LCD!

    to bro bluestrike,
    plan to do gaming, video editing on the com and the usual browsing of forums, msn stuff. i plan for the com to last at least 4 yrs, so go abt overkill on the processor. Concur with the larger HDD. But bit buy bit lo. get the basic system first.

    to bro zj2000,

    graphic card wise my plan is to get this as a stop gap while saving up for a super tok gong card. Vista 64bit? as you said, ram is cheap, go for broke lor.
    Kodak Easyshare C875
    flickr

  8. #8
    Senior Member NovJoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    ~Sunny Little Island~
    Posts
    5,651

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    As budget is in concern, you do not need the G45 series with onboard HDMI, just take the standard P45 series will do. Onboards usually cost more.

    Processor wise, you can get Conroe E8600 C2D processor, which is at the higher clock speed of 3.33GHz, same FSB 1333MHz and VT technology. Only difference is 2 core lesser and 6MB lesser from L2 cache since it has 2 cores vs 4 cores on Quad. Price should be much cheaper and it can handle gaming, video rendering and surfing as well.

    With the extra savings, you can using the buffer amount for extra HDD, better PSU or better graphics card, if not, save up as part of the 22" monitor you are aiming.

    Last edited by NovJoe; 1st April 2009 at 02:16 AM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member NovJoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    ~Sunny Little Island~
    Posts
    5,651

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Btw, you can refer to this page on the processor models and technology supported.

    http://www.intel.com/products/processor_number/

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Under the Stars
    Posts
    2,122

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Asus P5Q supports Quad processors.

    I will be getting a new DIY PC too and just to share, this is the confirmed specs.

    Asus MAXIMUS II Formula + Quad Q8200
    Corsair 2x2GB DDR2 800
    2x 500GB Seagate HDD
    Samsung DVD-RW
    ATI 4850HD 512mb
    Samsung 24" Full HD LCD
    Andyson 530W PSU
    CM 590 Chassis

    Why Q8200? Because it runs cool and with the motherboard, I can tweak it to a higher performing speed.

    Desktop to be used mainly for video, photo editings + 3d modeling and renders.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sengkang
    Posts
    2,922

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    A quad-core CPU is an overkill for almost anything if you are just a 'regular joe' using the computer. An E8600 and P45 board will last you a long time before software makers starts writing software optimised for the quad. Having more storage and more RAM should be a better choice. BTW, I really feel one shouldn't spend so much money on a CPU but instead get a good and solid motherboard & PSU instead. Hope that helps. Cheers!

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    390

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Quote Originally Posted by hazmee View Post
    A quad-core CPU is an overkill for almost anything if you are just a 'regular joe' using the computer. An E8600 and P45 board will last you a long time before software makers starts writing software optimised for the quad. Having more storage and more RAM should be a better choice. BTW, I really feel one shouldn't spend so much money on a CPU but instead get a good and solid motherboard & PSU instead. Hope that helps. Cheers!

    As for me, I won't know what is "a good and solid motherboard & PSU" if you don't give
    some examples. Kindly give me a particular motherboard & PSU as I would like to learn
    how to assemble a pc too. Many thanks in advance.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore, Bedok
    Posts
    1,129

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Hmm.. no one mentioned about the OS..

    If you may or plan to upgrade to > 4GB of RAM later, do get a 64bit OS. And ensure that all the hardware comes with 64bit drivers.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sengkang
    Posts
    2,922

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Quote Originally Posted by forward View Post
    As for me, I won't know what is "a good and solid motherboard & PSU" if you don't give
    some examples. Kindly give me a particular motherboard & PSU as I would like to learn
    how to assemble a pc too. Many thanks in advance.
    For a start, you can visit sites like these:

    www.hothardware.com
    www.anandtech.com
    www.overclockers.com

    From the information gathered there, you can make a very well informed decision. The information is free for you to use at your own will. I can't do all your homework for you so if you don't like to read or do your research then just go buy those branded PCs instead. Sorry to sound crude but this is just my humble opinion.

    For beginners, have a sense of budget. The next thing you need to know is your motherboard chipset type, e.g. Intel P45, G45, X58 etc... followed by finding the suitable processor to suit your computing behaviour... eg. surfing the web, do photoshop, play games. Learn all about the motherboard you are planning to get e.g. USB, Firewire, RAM PCI slots, built-in sound, HDMI etc. Make sure the motherboard has what you need. Don't just assume it has everything.

    The market is segmented into three main categories: Value (lowest end, slow) to Perfomance (higher end, faster). Read the reviews to find which one that suits you the most. I am absolutely sure you can find one because there are a hell lot of choices out there in the market. For PSUs, stick with branded ones and try not to skimp on this. There are a few 'OEM'/generic crappy PSUs floating around SLS and sales people claiming its works better than the branded ones.

    The next big question that adversely affects your purchase: Price. Ask yourself whether the price and performance is up to your expectations.

    After all that, the rest are quite easy and straight forward. Download the latest pricelist from Hardwarezone, see which ones are within your budget and check reviews.

    You don't need a master degree to figure this one out. Read, read and read. The answers are out there in the open. Dont let those cunning sales people at SLS dupe you into buying crappy stuff from their crappy inventory.

    Hope that helps.

    PS: About the OS, go 64bit and dont ever look back.
    Last edited by hazmee; 1st April 2009 at 10:04 AM.

  15. #15
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Beside Fernando Torress
    Posts
    427

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    here's my rig . Actually dont need Quad Core la. I find that Extreme is already enuff

    - Intel Core 2 Duo E8400, 3.0Ghz
    - MSI P45 Neo3-FR
    - 4GB RAM
    - Geforce 9500GT
    - ( My own HDD )
    - Samsung 22x CD writer
    - Andyson 500W P.S.U
    - Cooler Master 690 Casing
    - Cooler Master V8
    - OCZ twin fan memory cooler
    - LED fans 120mm x2
    - 90mm LED fans x 2
    - 140mm LED fans x 1 ( front panel)

    at a price of $950.
    Last edited by domdomino; 1st April 2009 at 10:04 AM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Outside the Dry Box.
    Posts
    16,268

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Quote Originally Posted by raptor1988 View Post
    i'm planning to get a new computer to replace my current P4. used for very long le and PSU is making a very loud noise. fed up with a non-gaming com and dun want to waste money to replace the parts, so might as well replace the whole system. i've been looking around the price lists for parts and i've come up with this:

    ASUS P5Q-EM G45 w/VGA+Sound+G.Lan+1394 HDMI (DDR2 board) + INTEL Core2 Quad Q9550 1333MHZ (2.83GHz) 12MB L2 $652

    Kingston DDR2-667 2GBx2 $62 - might as well use 800 or higher since no price difference.

    SEAGATE Barracuda 7200.10 -320GB- (16MB) Serial ATA-II $74 - get WD... i've lost confidence on Seagate after the recent bad news surrounding it esp the 7200.10 batch.

    CM ExtremePower Plus 500W - 3Y $82

    Samsung SATA 22XDVDRW - int. $35

    CoolerMaster CM690 Black ATX $129

    Asustek GF9600GT HDMI 512MB $169

    total would be abt $1203.

    i've 'assembled' this parts list from various brochures and i just treat this as a rough guide as i intend to go down next week to confirm and then buy the various components.

    i find that the price for this kind of specs is quite reasonable. but would like to seek the advice of fellow CSers who have built their own PCs before. For eg wad to look out for when doing such a build and any shops that i die die must avoid (SLS). Also, if you do spot any potential conflicting hardware, do let me know.

    If you have any interesting 'stories' that happen when buying such a computer/assembling your own, do share with us.
    read the bold
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    singapore
    Posts
    1,799

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    I just build one 2 weeks ago. My aim for extremely stable system, without much bells & wistles (eg no need to crossfire) with top grade component at sweet price (some like powersupply will last for at least 10 years), with some potential of overclocking. Most likely in 3 yrs time I have to upgrade the videocard but I dont mind.

    1. Asus P5Q motherboard (the basic of the P5Q line, with only 1 PCI-E v2.0 card slot, since I decide not to do Crossfire or SLI)
    2. Intel Core2Duo E8400 - 3.0 GHz 6 MB L2 cache CPU
    3. Western Digital 500 GB SATA 2.0 Harddrive (Caviar Black)
    4. Corsair HX520W Power Supply, a more expensive but better power supply (less noise, power fluctuation), longer lifespan of components
    5. Cooler Master Hyper TX2, the cheap but good Fan CPU cooler (because I do not want to use Intel fan - it is not built for overclocking)
    6. Gigabyte NVidia GeForce 9500GT Overclock 1 GB DDR2 graphic card.
    7. Corsair Twin2X2048-600C4DHX. A pair of 1 GB PC2-6400 800 MHz CAS 4 RAM. Not very top end RAM cos I read on tomshardware the diff in performance is actually very little (less than 10% and you have to pay lots more - not worth it).

    I am happy with my purchase other than #6. I am not happy with the way gigabyte handle customer question. I asked regarding warranty cos there is no warranty card and there is no registration. Like that how? Not much proof other than the receipt for 3 yrs warranty. I know the distributor is CDL Trading Pte Ltd, some people say they have been in this business for long but I never deal with them.

    I have self assembled since 1997, when they are still selling dodgy software at sim lim :-)

    http://cuteaholic.xanga.com/69702955...d-frustration/
    http://cuteaholic.xanga.com/69703062...ration-part-2/
    http://cuteaholic.xanga.com/69730570...ranty-problem/
    http://cuteaholic.xanga.com/69733077...roblem-update/

    I reuse my old LG DVD+RW & casing (chucked out the 5+ yrs old generic power supply)

    And now... I can play Warhammer 40K Dawn of War II (the orkz sound a but childish .. less brutish .. I hate how they sound now - prefer the old sound in WH40K-DoW1)
    Last edited by aryanto; 1st April 2009 at 11:00 AM.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sengkang
    Posts
    2,922

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Good choice there Aryanto. Anyone using Gigabyte board besides myself?

    Intel E8400
    Gigabyte GA-EP45-DS3
    Kingston 667MHz 8GB RAM
    Leadtek 8800GT
    500GB Western Digital (OS X + Windows x64 in VMware)
    1TB Hitachi x2 (soft RAID 0)
    1TB Hitachi for back up (using Time Machine)
    Antec 550W PSU
    Last edited by hazmee; 1st April 2009 at 11:26 AM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Outside the Dry Box.
    Posts
    16,268

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Quote Originally Posted by hazmee View Post
    Good choice there Aryanto. Anyone using Gigabyte board besides myself?

    Intel E8400
    Gigabyte GA-EP45-DS3
    Kingston 667MHz 8GB RAM
    Leadtek 8800GT
    500GB Western Digital (OS X + Windows x64 in VMware)
    1TB Hitachi x2 (soft RAID 0)
    1TB Hitachi for back up (using Time Machine)
    Antec 550W PSU
    never had a good gigabyte board before... maybe if they change to terrabyte then i'll try again...

    have always been an ASUS user since more than 10 years ago...
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Self-Assembled PC

    Anybody using AMD CPU... I have been using AMD and I usually save a few hundred $$$$

    More Ram on board, faster HD, faster graphic card, sufficient PSU.. all contribute the speed of the system! Have enough of cooling system for the box.... fanciful LED will draw away the power for the CPU and the rest of the cards!

Page 1 of 8 1236 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •