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Thread: DSLR -> SLR

  1. #1

    Default DSLR -> SLR

    Qn:

    Lets say I have an average SLR. If I first used a DSLR to meter a shot and get the correct exposure (the effect I want) then switch over to my SLR using the same settings, will I get similar results on film? (Assuming subject is constant) Can we ignore the crop factor on the DSLR if we use a constant lens (F4 or 2.8) and just zoom to compose the same area. Since we stand at the same area, the light from the object entering the lens will not differ that much right?

    (25marks)


    Kidding bout the points

    Please advise.......

  2. #2
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    I'll say it's going to be different cos each camera's metering system is most likely different. Beside, the DSLR you also have the WB setting so the end product could be way different.

    But then again, the chances of getting a similar photo is also there.

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    if the iso of the dslr and the film in the slr is the same, then there should not be too much of a difference. of course, different camera have different meters... canons evaluative meter would prob give different reading from nikons matrix meter...
    and center weighted meter might have different weightage and various spot meters have different sizes of the "spot"...
    so there you have it...

    lots of factors...

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by showtime
    if the iso of the dslr and the film in the slr is the same, then there should not be too much of a difference. of course, different camera have different meters... canons evaluative meter would prob give different reading from nikons matrix meter...
    and center weighted meter might have different weightage and various spot meters have different sizes of the "spot"...
    so there you have it...

    lots of factors...
    Okay, there's something I don't understand. Will the metering on the two cameras matter? Cause the metering is to help get a correct exposure yes? If my DSLR exposes the shot correctly (with either metering system) and I transfer the settings to my SLR, with the same ISO, then it wouldn't matter right?

    I'm quite confused over this.

    The metering comes from a sensor in the camera that determines the correct light needed for correct exposure. If the two DSLR and SLR uses different sensors -i.e different set of readings, the same amount of light will still reach the camera? (ignoring the little difference in film or CCD distance etc) So is it right to say that one set of settings on the DSLR providing a correct exposure would warrant the same exposure on the SLR (with the variables I mentioned earlier remain constant)??

    I should probably try this out one of these days.......

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    Quote Originally Posted by HelmetBox
    Okay, there's something I don't understand. Will the metering on the two cameras matter? Cause the metering is to help get a correct exposure yes? If my DSLR exposes the shot correctly (with either metering system) and I transfer the settings to my SLR, with the same ISO, then it wouldn't matter right?

    I'm quite confused over this.

    The metering comes from a sensor in the camera that determines the correct light needed for correct exposure. If the two DSLR and SLR uses different sensors -i.e different set of readings, the same amount of light will still reach the camera? (ignoring the little difference in film or CCD distance etc) So is it right to say that one set of settings on the DSLR providing a correct exposure would warrant the same exposure on the SLR (with the variables I mentioned earlier remain constant)??

    I should probably try this out one of these days.......
    FYI, camera from the same brand also have different metering system. Nikon F5 and F80 both have matrix metering but in the F5(is called 3d matrix), the camera actually compared the meter subject against 1000 image pre-stored in a chip to guess the correct exposure(If I'm not wrong).

    Even camera of the same brand and model will have some slight difference in metering, usually it's about 1/3 ev. You nomally can't tell the difference because it's slight. And this is esp. so when you're shooting negative because the latitude for negative is so great.

    This is one of the reason why some professional photographer like John Shaw tend to "prime" their film camera to get the correct ISO setting for different slide films. i.e. best ISO setting for one specific type of slide film. Shouldn't touch on this too much here.*read, long explaination*

    Therefore unless the 2 camera is of the same model, the metering of 2 different camera will somehow produce 2 slightly different image. And the difference will be much more clearly seen when one is in digital and one on film.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kira
    Therefore unless the 2 camera is of the same model, the metering of 2 different camera will somehow produce 2 slightly different image. And the difference will be much more clearly seen when one is in digital and one on film.
    I don't dispute the fact that metering systems will never be the same, but I think the original question that needs to be answered is: will exactly the same settings on a DSLR versus a SLR yield the same results? ie:

    1) DSLR: ISO 100, Shutter 1/125 sec, Aperture f/16

    vs

    2) Conventional SLR: ISO 100, Shutter 1/125, Aperture f/16


    Will they produce the same results given the same subject and condition?

    Personally, I think they should produce similar (though not the same results). Some factors that may produce a different result: white balance settings on the DSLR versus the kind of film on the SLR (tungsten? daylight?). Also, it depends on the calibration of the ISO on the digital camera. If I remember correctly, Canon used to "round down" their ISO settings on the G3, so that for eg. ISO 50 on the G3 is actually closer to ISO 80-90 sensitivity compared to other cameras.

  7. #7
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    I think as a summary you can say that the results will be the same within reasonable variation. Even in the same camera it is possible to get slightly different results in the same situation.

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    should produce similar results. you don't need to use a DSLR to meter too, you could just get one of the prosumer cameras with adjustable ISO, aperture and shutter speed and several metering options.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kira
    FYI, camera from the same brand also have different metering system. Nikon F5 and F80 both have matrix metering but in the F5(is called 3d matrix), the camera actually compared the meter subject against 1000 image pre-stored in a chip to guess the correct exposure(If I'm not wrong).

    Even camera of the same brand and model will have some slight difference in metering, usually it's about 1/3 ev. You nomally can't tell the difference because it's slight. And this is esp. so when you're shooting negative because the latitude for negative is so great.

    This is one of the reason why some professional photographer like John Shaw tend to "prime" their film camera to get the correct ISO setting for different slide films. i.e. best ISO setting for one specific type of slide film. Shouldn't touch on this too much here.*read, long explaination*

    Therefore unless the 2 camera is of the same model, the metering of 2 different camera will somehow produce 2 slightly different image. And the difference will be much more clearly seen when one is in digital and one on film.
    Hi Kira,

    I do understand the different metering system as you have previously mentioned. I understand that the metering systems are something like a chip programmed to tell you what settings to use to get correct exposure, i.e, the better the metering system, the more accurate the exposure will be.

    But then again, the amount of light reaching my camera film or ccd/cmos will still be the same, provided its the same lens with the same aperture and the subject luminance remains unchanged. So if I used a pro-DSLR with a better metering system, metered the shot and then transferred the settings to a not pro normal SLR, theoratically it should provide me with the same exposure right?

    Its like saying that if a prosumer DSLR cannot meter a shot correctly due to its 'inferior' programmed metering chip, I can use a pro-DSLR to meter the shot and then transfer the settings to the prosumer DSLR to obtain same exposure (again ignoring all the other variables)

    My concern is the light reaching my camera giving the exposure. This is unchanged, so it ought to provide similar results?

    Please advise.

  10. #10
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    If you meter with your DSLR, then transfer settings to your film SLR, then assuming your DSLR meter is reasonably accurate and hasn't been fooled by things in the subject (like backlight), then chances are you will get a reasonably similar pic on the film SLR.

    Heck, I've even tried this with a old Coolpix 950 (2mp) and transfer settings to my F100 with good success.

    Regards
    CK

  11. #11

    Default Depends on the film too

    Watch this case:

    Two same cameras, same aperture setting, same shutter speed, same conditions, same composition, different films at SAME ISO can give different result.

    Let's say Kodak something 100 giving such result, but Fuji something 100 gives darker result. Then I strated to realise that this particular Fuji is not as sensitive as the ISO rating written, I prefer to set my camera at ISO80 whan I am using this particular film.

    So to answer the original question:
    "It should give very similar result providing the film's sensitivity vs Digital's sensitivity is dead spot on"

    Hope I am not confusing you more.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by HelmetBox
    Hi Kira,

    I do understand the different metering system as you have previously mentioned. I understand that the metering systems are something like a chip programmed to tell you what settings to use to get correct exposure, i.e, the better the metering system, the more accurate the exposure will be.

    But then again, the amount of light reaching my camera film or ccd/cmos will still be the same, provided its the same lens with the same aperture and the subject luminance remains unchanged. So if I used a pro-DSLR with a better metering system, metered the shot and then transferred the settings to a not pro normal SLR, theoratically it should provide me with the same exposure right?

    Its like saying that if a prosumer DSLR cannot meter a shot correctly due to its 'inferior' programmed metering chip, I can use a pro-DSLR to meter the shot and then transfer the settings to the prosumer DSLR to obtain same exposure (again ignoring all the other variables)

    My concern is the light reaching my camera giving the exposure. This is unchanged, so it ought to provide similar results?

    Please advise.
    Yes, the amount of light reaching your camera film or ccd/cmos will still be the same. But how sensitive your film/CCD/COMS is to light is different. Even for the same type of CCD/CMOS there'll be a slight variation. But these variation are minimum so you'll most probability not be able to tell the difference. Therefore, similiar results yes, same results, most probability not.

    The big question here is how the camera judge which subject in the picture is 18% gray. And how accurate is the metering system in judging that 18% gray. To fully understand how all these work, I suggest that you read up more on metering system and how your camera meter. Most cases the camera metering system will provide you with a good readout but there are cases where your metering system will fail. One good example will be when you meter your subject with more then 70% white background using matrix metering, eg subject with snow background.

    In a nutshell, you're the one taking the picture, not the camera. So you must decide how your picture is suppose to be, not your camera. Photography is all about lighting and light, like everything else in this world, is dynamic. So under control situation, it is possible to get same results using the same camera but for your question, you'll most probability get similiar results and not same.

    Hope this helps.

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