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Thread: Is Lee Filters Half CT Blue = Tungsten gel?

  1. #1

    Default Is Lee Filters Half CT Blue = Tungsten gel?

    Today, I just went to buy tungsten gel. When I got to the shop, I was surprised that there were so much choices: the degree of darkness and colors.

    The staff suggested that if I wanted white light under tungsten lightning, I should get blue. The decision was what to get for the degree of darkness.

    So is Lee Filters Half CT Blue the so called tungsten gel (this seems to be a not very common term)? Can anyone enlightened me?

    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Is Lee Filters Half CT Blue = Tungsten gel?

    you should be getting CTO (orange), the idea is to get your flash to match the colour cast of the ambient light source, in which cast tungsten lights give a orangy cast.. as for strength, you don't really need to be so exact, a full CTO works well for colour balancing purposes..

  3. #3
    Senior Member darrrrrrrrrr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is Lee Filters Half CT Blue = Tungsten gel?

    Quote Originally Posted by qING View Post
    The staff suggested that if I wanted white light under tungsten lightning, I should get blue.
    Thanks.
    the staff don't seem to know their stuff?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Is Lee Filters Half CT Blue = Tungsten gel?

    The staff is not wrong.

    You can CTB a tungsten light SOURCE to increase the low temperatures and get 'white' light.

    If a customer is not specific about applications, don't forget that gelling, in the old days, more likely refers to gelling the SOURCE as was the industry standard and practise in any production, and this is likely what they were referring to.

    It's only fairly recently that strobist and strobbing calls for applying gels on small flash units to match uncorrected source lights. A flash or light added to a room or set afterwards is usually regarded as a supplementary light (because you're adding on to what was already there), even though the supplementary can over-power the source and act as a main light.

    If you don't tell the supplier exactly what you intend to do/need to achieve, you can't expect them to read your mind.

    Which was it you wanted to do? Correct the source light or alter the temp of your flash to match source lights and then adjust your entire WB to match the evened out warm light?

    Generally, where very accurate results is required, gelling the source is preferable to gelling supplementary, but this might require multiple gels is there is more than one source.
    Last edited by Dream Merchant; 21st March 2009 at 12:26 AM.

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