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Thread: newbie's 1st picts!

  1. #1

    Default newbie's 1st picts!



    10D with Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8
    @200mm f/2.8 1/3200 ISO400

    I just couldn't resist to use my new lens! - even though I can't find anything better to take And thus I had to exploit the poor little cat that wanders outside my house.

    Just had to open it all up to full zoom at f/2.8. Never tried this before. The feeling is intense. The world's so much brighter now!

    Is this what photography does to people? Cause it feels good.
    Last edited by Kei; 20th October 2003 at 01:05 PM.

  2. #2

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    Oh yah, forgot. Feel free to comment. Without them, how to improve?

  3. #3

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    see no have.. btw, you're one rich newbie..

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by sk_online
    see no have.. btw, you're one rich newbie..
    See no have? Oh... did I attach the pic wrongly? First time trying so....... Can anyone see the pic? IT looks fine on my side........

    Rich?! I'm working my butts off to pay off my equipment....... Even my poor little pink piggy is gone....... Donnoe when I can start affording a decent flash....... Never plan ahead.......

  5. #5

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    can see it now... lack of dof, so a bit soft..

    OT: a bit confused by fstops on the lens & shutter of DSLRs, what does the fstop of the lens for? i tot the aperture control is @ the shutter?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sk_online
    can see it now... lack of dof, so a bit soft..

    OT: a bit confused by fstops on the lens & shutter of DSLRs, what does the fstop of the lens for? i tot the aperture control is @ the shutter?
    The pic looks alright to me, perhaps could use a bit of USM...and maybe fill in flash to bring out the details in the cat's face. About the softness part...depends on whether u r talking abt just the cat's face or the whole picture in general. AFAIK, lack of DOF does not cause softness, the subject (in this example the cat's face) can be sharp but the rest of the picture thrown out of focus due to the wide aperture used. Softness is usually the result of handshake when handholding the lens at low shutter speeds, or when the subject is not in focus.

    The term 'fstop' refers to the aperture value being used. For SLR cameras, the aperture blades are usually found on the lens, and you can control the value of the aperture (i.e control how big or how small the opening in the lens which allows light in) using the camera body (in aperture priority or Manual mode). Aperture and shutter are two different things altogether. Shutter blades are found in the camera body in front of the film plane or CCD sensor and activated only when you depress the shutter button to allow the image to be recorded on the film plane/CCD sensor. This is only applicable to SLR type of cameras. For consumer digital cameras w/ fixed lenses, I believe the aperture and shutter mechanism is combined together.

    Hope this helps...do correct me if I am wrong.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garion
    The pic looks alright to me, perhaps could use a bit of USM...and maybe fill in flash to bring out the details in the cat's face. About the softness part...depends on whether u r talking abt just the cat's face or the whole picture in general. AFAIK, lack of DOF does not cause softness, the subject (in this example the cat's face) can be sharp but the rest of the picture thrown out of focus due to the wide aperture used. Softness is usually the result of handshake when handholding the lens at low shutter speeds, or when the subject is not in focus.

    The term 'fstop' refers to the aperture value being used. For SLR cameras, the aperture blades are usually found on the lens, and you can control the value of the aperture (i.e control how big or how small the opening in the lens which allows light in) using the camera body (in aperture priority or Manual mode). Aperture and shutter are two different things altogether. Shutter blades are found in the camera body in front of the film plane or CCD sensor and activated only when you depress the shutter button to allow the image to be recorded on the film plane/CCD sensor. This is only applicable to SLR type of cameras. For consumer digital cameras w/ fixed lenses, I believe the aperture and shutter mechanism is combined together.

    Hope this helps...do correct me if I am wrong.
    So the focus for this pic is prolly just in front of the cat's face? as it's not really sharp. (no offence helmetbox, we're all learning rite?)

    I didnt know aperture blades for SLRs are separate from the shutter blade as depicted on many photography guides.. thanks garion.

    So Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 can zoom from 70mm-200mm , f/2.8 the max the aperture can be opened up to? (ie.: F/2.8 - F16 or more depending on cam?)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sk_online
    So the focus for this pic is prolly just in front of the cat's face? as it's not really sharp. (no offence helmetbox, we're all learning rite?)
    Helmetbox probably focused on the cat's face...perhaps around the nose area. As I had mentioned, lack of sharpness could be due to several factors...handshake, subject not in focus, etc. Occasionally, it might also be due to a particular lens exhibiting back focus or front focus behaviour (touchwood hehe). This means the lens focuses on a point in front or behind where it is supposed to lock focus on...resulting in blurry or out of focus pictures.

    I didnt know aperture blades for SLRs are separate from the shutter blade as depicted on many photography guides.. thanks garion.

    So Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 can zoom from 70mm-200mm , f/2.8 the max the aperture can be opened up to? (ie.: F/2.8 - F16 or more depending on cam?)
    Yes, that is right. This lens also maintains max aperture of f2.8 at all focal lengths (i.e. it is still f2.8 regardless of whether its at 70mm or 200mm) which is an advantage as you won't need to alter your other settings (e.g shutter speed) to maintain the correct exposure at different focal lengths. Some other lenses (e.g EF 28-135mm f3.5-5.6) have max aperture which changes depending on the focal length of the lens.

  9. #9

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    I'd prefer a lower angle... Try to go lower to get the shot. I sometimes lie down on the floor...

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garion
    Helmetbox probably focused on the cat's face...perhaps around the nose area. As I had mentioned, lack of sharpness could be due to several factors...handshake, subject not in focus, etc. Occasionally, it might also be due to a particular lens exhibiting back focus or front focus behaviour (touchwood hehe). This means the lens focuses on a point in front or behind where it is supposed to lock focus on...resulting in blurry or out of focus pictures.

    Yes, that is right. This lens also maintains max aperture of f2.8 at all focal lengths (i.e. it is still f2.8 regardless of whether its at 70mm or 200mm) which is an advantage as you won't need to alter your other settings (e.g shutter speed) to maintain the correct exposure at different focal lengths. Some other lenses (e.g EF 28-135mm f3.5-5.6) have max aperture which changes depending on the focal length of the lens.
    yesszz... master.. thanks!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by sk_online
    So the focus for this pic is prolly just in front of the cat's face? as it's not really sharp. (no offence helmetbox, we're all learning rite?)

    I didnt know aperture blades for SLRs are separate from the shutter blade as depicted on many photography guides.. thanks garion.

    So Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 can zoom from 70mm-200mm , f/2.8 the max the aperture can be opened up to? (ie.: F/2.8 - F16 or more depending on cam?)
    Oh ho ho. No offence, no offence! I like comments! It was deliberate the blur the body cause my old f3.5 couldn't quite produce as good bokeh.

  12. #12

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    Ok, the focus was on the cat's nose (Garion: 'ding dong ding dong' Read: smart, you got it right!)

    Thanks Garion for the tip on the fill in flash. But then got a few problem. Can't afford a decent external flash at the moment. Then my 10D flash produces slight vignetting with the long lens. Lastly, the cat would probably scramble off once I flash it or scratch the guts out of me! (we're not on good terms as I constantly stop him from entering my house ) and leave me with no opportunity to shoot him again.

    Question, if I did use flash, it should be off a bounce? Else it would cause red eye on the cat yes?

    AReality, I totally agree on you on the lower angle shot, but then as I mentioned, I'm not on good terms with this cat, he's waiting for the chance to scratch me and going down wouldn't be a good idea. hehe. I'll jot that down and take some low angle shots next time round!

    Thanks!

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