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Thread: Must I buy light meter?

  1. #21
    Member/Tangshooter
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    Default Re: Must I buy light meter?

    I would say light meter is a handy tool only for setting up of lights (strobes/flash).

    If u r shooting ambient lighting, the in camera metering works fine, and always review and adjust..that's the luxury of digital. In film days, some cameras don't even have built in camera metering, hence a light meter is handy, if not, then can only rely on sunny f16 rule.
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  2. #22
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    Default Re: Must I buy light meter?

    Just put to AV or P mode and let it rip. No point getting a light meter unless used for indoor with strobes situation.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member geraldkhoo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Must I buy light meter?

    Quote Originally Posted by calebk View Post
    Wrong. When you are in manual mode, the camera does not adjust exposure settings for you, but it meters. You have confused the camera performing auto exposure adjustments as metering. They are different things.

    Check your metering bar in the viewfinder, and you should see that the metering indicator is all the way underexposed if you set your shutter speed too fast or aperture opening too small. As you bring your exposure values closer to 1/15s + f/2, you will notice that your metering indicator moves towards the 0 point of the metering bar.
    ah... yes... thanks
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  4. #24

    Default Re: Must I buy light meter?

    Hi to All. Thank you guys for the views. I agree that light meter may not be good for me at this stage. I like outdoor portraiture and scenery. The advices on how to use manual focusing are valuable. I shall make attempt to experience manual focusing.

    This site is fantastic for newbies. In the past I was also persuaded not to buy another camera to solve my exposure and metering problems but to overcome these problems through understandingthe issues with my camera. I own a Canon 400D and intended to buy Nikon D90 then. I had manged to capture a few nice shots but must confess that understanding exposure and metering for newbies are easy say than done.

    Good job.

  5. #25
    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    Default Re: Must I buy light meter?

    that is the spirit

    there are books that you can read on the subject of exposure
    the library is one good source

  6. #26

    Default Re: Must I buy light meter?

    Quote Originally Posted by joekohys View Post
    Hi to All. Thank you guys for the views. I agree that light meter may not be good for me at this stage. I like outdoor portraiture and scenery. The advices on how to use manual exposure mode are valuable. I shall make attempt to experience manual exposure mode.

    This site is fantastic for newbies. In the past I was also persuaded not to buy another camera to solve my exposure and metering problems but to overcome these problems through understandingthe issues with my camera. I own a Canon 400D and intended to buy Nikon D90 then. I had manged to capture a few nice shots but must confess that understanding exposure and metering for newbies are easy say than done.

    Good job.
    A couple small corrections to make things clear. Manual focusing is different from manual exposure mode
    D90 | 16-85mmVR | 70-300mmVR | AF-S 50mm 1.4

  7. #27

    Default Re: Must I buy light meter?

    Quote Originally Posted by ortega View Post
    that is the spirit

    there are books that you can read on the subject of exposure
    the library is one good source
    I would agree.

    The mistake most folks starting out (and even intermediate) make is to bypass all the basics and go out and bang away. The often used advise of shoot more, learn more is something I do not feel is the best way to learn, if that is what one is interested in doing. It's great for skimming and learning how to get by using one's camera controls without ever really knowing what one is doing, or why.

    As Ortega offered - the public library is now your best friend.

    All the best.



    Catchlights, you forgot, go right, go left, pless here, pless there get chance to survey subjeck up close and personal mah! Use kamela meter where can do that so easily?

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