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Thread: My Infra-Red Neighbourhood - Panorama & Others

  1. #1
    tomcat
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    Default My Infra-Red Neighbourhood - Panorama & Others

    Today was an exceptionally bright day with clear blue skies and I thought it should be really great weather for another round of infra-red photography around my neighbourhood.

    Also this gave me an opportunity to try out another lens, my old Tamron 28-200mm f/3-8-5.6 to see if it is suitable for IR photography. Turned out that it was even better than the Canon EF 28-135mm IS lens that I had used the first time. It created even less of a hot spot than the Canon lens.


    See it here for a larger picture.


    Cotton trees of Singapore ?


    umm.. Does this remind you of something?







    Thanks for viewing.
    Last edited by tomcat; 17th October 2003 at 12:30 AM.

  2. #2
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    Nice shots. good composition esp for the second one.
    Noticed that your second shot the trees were a little blur.
    Was it intentional?

  3. #3
    Moderator teerex's Avatar
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    Nice pics, very well exposed.
    Which IR filter are you using. I never seem to be able to get the blue in the sky with the Hoya R72.
    Have gone thru' all your IR pics in pbase, learnt quite a bit with your EXIF.

  4. #4
    tomcat
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    Nice shots. good composition esp for the second one.
    Noticed that your second shot the trees were a little blur.
    Was it intentional?
    Thanks. The trees are actually blurred in all the shots and this is because of the long exposure time of 20s needed to take these shots.

    Quote Originally Posted by teerex
    Nice pics, very well exposed.
    Which IR filter are you using. I never seem to be able to get the blue in the sky with the Hoya R72.
    Have gone thru' all your IR pics in pbase, learnt quite a bit with your EXIF.
    Thanks. I am also using Hoya R72. The output from the Hoya R72 is still tinted red to some extent even after CWB is applied, hence the usual rust colored skies. To get a blue sky, you would need to apply a post-processing technique called Channel Swapping where the Red and Blue colour channels are swapped over ie what was red is now blue and vice versa. Very easy to do using the usual photo editing softwares. I learned this from other IR enthusiasts on the internet.

  5. #5
    Moderator teerex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    Thanks. The trees are actually blurred in all the shots and this is because of the long exposure time of 20s needed to take these shots.


    Thanks. I am also using Hoya R72. The output from the Hoya R72 is still tinted red to some extent even after CWB is applied, hence the usual rust colored skies. To get a blue sky, you would need to apply a post-processing technique called Channel Swapping where the Red and Blue colour channels are swapped over ie what was red is now blue and vice versa. Very easy to do using the usual photo editing softwares. I learned this from other IR enthusiasts on the internet.
    Now I understand why my skies are NEVER blue. Thanks for the tim, will try.

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