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Thread: What do you really mean by DOF?

  1. #1
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    Default What do you really mean by DOF?

    I have 1 question which is plaguing me. What do you really mean by "Your photo has a good Depth of Field."?

    I understand that if your picture's background is blurr, and your object is sharp, this is considered as shallow DOF. But when the same picture has both the background and the object to be sharp, can it be said that the picture has a good DOF, since the background is also sharp?

    Am I correct to say that? I would appreciate any answers.

  2. #2
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    Yes, if I understand you right. Calling it "good" DOF is probably an inaccuracy since you don't want lots of DOF in all pictures. Better to do as I do, and describe it as a lot of depth of field versus very little. Whether it is good or not depends on the shot and is wholly subjective. The commonly used tech words are shallow and great or extensive or something to that effect.

  3. #3

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    or common phrase

    GREAT BOKEH EFFECT !!!
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

  4. #4
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    I normally refer to DOF as it is, simply DOF.

    There is no good/bad DOF, just shallower/deeper DOF (less or more). Just like shutter speed. There is high or low shutter speed, but no good or bad shutter speed.

    There is, however, sufficient or insufficient DOF, where the question is more about how appropriate is the DOF chosen to the subject of the photo. There are cases in which more DOF is good, and there are cases in which less DOF is better.

    Again, just like shutter speed. Sometimes higher is better, and sometimes slower is better.

    I am generally confused by comments such as "you picture has good DOF", but I take it that the person giving the comment is generally saying "the DOF is appropriate in this picture", or more specifically, "the subject is in good focus, while the way the background is thrown off focus is visually pleasing".
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for all the answer.

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