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Thread: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

  1. #21

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by annihilus89 View Post
    as the title says... i need recommendations on what is the leading brand for potraits photography ? i know its rather subjective.. but in another way, what is the brand that most ppl use for professional portrait photography ?
    There is NONE in the 35mm DSLR spec. I've seen very successful pros using Canon, Nikon, Sony, Olympus and Pentax.

    If there was one brand recognized as the leader in portrait photography, you can bet they'd have that ad plastered on every bus.

    Most portrait photographers work in a studio, with studio lightings. This negates any particular brand's flash system advantages.

    All brands have good lenses in the 50, 85 and 135mm prime range, which are the standard ranges for portrait photography.

    Full-blown professionals will usually use Hasselblad.
    Alpha

  2. #22

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Spyder_Web16 View Post
    if u wanna get a DSLR for potraiture.... consider the lenses(candid)(ur dof,etc)(fast or slow) that u might need, consider the camera body(noise handling, grain, light , heavy) ,

    I do potraiture, streets n strobist style...both have their own approach... so consider ur equipment...
    Noise handling and grain are not big factors in a low-iso studio photography environment.
    Alpha

  3. #23
    Senior Member Anson's Avatar
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    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    To my knowledge, a dslr that uses the 4/3 system (eg: Olympus, Panasonic) may not be the top choice if you intend to use it primary for Portrait Photography. The reason is it lack a range of F1.x lens, hence you need to make up with the increase in the focal distance to get the same DoF.

    Do correct me if I am wrong...

  4. #24

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    I am superstitous, always believing that a bigger sensor should be more superior.
    So if i reason with my own alter ego like a schzio i would say 4/3 sensor is smaller than a 1.5x sensor, or a 1.3x or a medium format or even full frame. Still i believe if a lens has not too long a default minimum focusing distance (as in a macro lens or one with the focusing spec closer to it) it should be good enough as a potraits lens. At a long end a telephoto lens can also be used as a potrait lens if i have no distractions in between the gap now between me and my model. Techniques plays a part and a fast big aperture one with circular blades for the bokeh desirable as well.

    I am using my 70~300 as a potrait lens.

  5. #25

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    To my knowledge, a dslr that uses the 4/3 system (eg: Olympus, Panasonic) may not be the top choice if you intend to use it primary for Portrait Photography. The reason is it lack a range of F1.x lens, hence you need to make up with the increase in the focal distance to get the same DoF.

    Do correct me if I am wrong...
    Yes, you are wrong. Both Sigma and Leica makes fast lenses for Olympus, besides, if you really need thin DOF you need to get a Hassy. Any other of the cropped alternatives are as bad or as good.

    Besides, you only have to ask yourself, how many of you shoot wide open all the time and why?

    The next question you have to ask yourself is how many of you actually have fast, (f/1.x) lenses? I guess very few. I do, but not often I need anything less than f/3.5. The fastest I have is f/1.4. Remember, this is the newbie page and a newbie question, most newbies have only kit zooms and many will never buy anything else.

    Then you have to ask yourself, how many real pros and famous portrait photogs actually use f/1x? Very few, and only for special purpose.

    Most people stay in the range of f/5.6-f/11 almost all the time for several reasons. One is that most lenses, except Olympus and a few highly priced ones, are soft and quite mediocre wide open.

    You also have to ask yourself, do you like to see eye lashes sharp and the corner of the eye fuzzy all the time? If yes then get a Hassy and a very fast lens. If not then get any other camera.

    You talk the talk of those who don't really know, just repeat what they have heard and that's not good. Better get some experience and answer a few questions.
    Last edited by OlyFlyer; 29th January 2009 at 04:56 AM.

  6. #26

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by liarliar View Post
    I am superstitous, always believing that a bigger sensor should be more superior.
    So if i reason with my own alter ego like a schzio i would say 4/3 sensor is smaller than a 1.5x sensor, or a 1.3x or a medium format or even full frame. Still i believe if a lens has not too long a default minimum focusing distance (as in a macro lens or one with the focusing spec closer to it) it should be good enough as a potraits lens. At a long end a telephoto lens can also be used as a potrait lens if i have no distractions in between the gap now between me and my model. Techniques plays a part and a fast big aperture one with circular blades for the bokeh desirable as well.

    I am using my 70~300 as a potrait lens.
    You are absolutely right. Bigger sensor has some advantages, but also disadvantages. Every system is a compromise in some way, however, as long as you buy a cropped camera, 2x or 1.5x makes no big difference. But in the end, all comes down to money, the more you spend the better camera and lens you get, except in case of Olympus, because it is well known that they do make really nice lenses and are not as expensive as other brand in similar quality. Anyway, all presently made cameras are good, and if a photog fails in 99% of the cases it is his own fault. Of course, to blame the camera is always easier...

  7. #27
    Senior Member Anson's Avatar
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    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by OlyFlyer View Post
    Yes, you are wrong. Both Sigma and Leica makes fast lenses for Olympus, besides, if you really need thin DOF you need to get a Hassy. Any other of the cropped alternatives are as bad or as good.
    Thanks for the info, if I am not wrong a handful of the 4/3 lens that have a bigger F-stop (F1.x ~ F2.0) and there generally more expensive than the other brands (Nikon & Canon) given the same focal length right?

  8. #28
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    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by annihilus89 View Post
    just to make it simple.

    which technology would further help in portraits photography?

    is Sony's supersteadyshot good for portraits ? or do u guys think nikon's flash system can make up to it with a VR lens ? or is there other technology from other brands ?

    also... what is a basic portrait lens to start with ? preferrably a prime lens ? what mm ?
    To get a good portrait photography you should ask about the LENS first... then ask yourself about your SKILL and KNOWLEDGE... and then you can start looking for info on CAMERAS... The person who introduced me to the world of photography was only using Yashica FX3 Super 2000 with a Zeiss 85mm 1.4, and he was one of the pro in portraiture.

    If you just wanted to start, just buy any brand with 50mm 1.8 lens. Learn and then grow with the brand, understand it's strong point and weakness...
    Achetez ce que vous souhaitez, pas ce que vous voulez...

  9. #29

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    Thanks for the info, if I am not wrong a handful of the 4/3 lens that have a bigger F-stop (F1.x ~ F2.0) and there generally more expensive than the other brands (Nikon & Canon) given the same focal length right?
    Olympus has f/2lenses in the range of 14-150mm (28-300mm equivalent). Of these, only two are primes, a 50mm and a 150mm. Leica and Sigma makes other lenses as well but I am not familiar with those. I know both Canon and Nikon has a very few 50mm with larger then f/2, which are fairly cheap but that's all. As far as I know those aren't exactly high quality lenses, but you are right, they are cheap. I can not say much about Canon and Nikon lenses since I don't have those cameras so I don't have much information about their lenses.

    I have just recently decided to stay with Olympus a little while more and bought the 50-200/f2.8-3.5 SWD lens for over US$1200 (here in Sweden). My other option was to get rid of all Oly I have and get a D700. I did not do that because I realized that the weight and the prices of the Nikon lenses would have killed me, and while I could get razor thin DOF with the D700, I would struggle to get the reach I need and would break my back carrying those lenses. I see no point in having a system with such limitations. While it may be fine for studio use but it is not exactly a travel companion. While I many times wish Olympus had many more primes, the only range I really wish they had is the long one, 400mm (800mm equivalent) or above. Below that range I think their zooms cover what I (and most others) need in any quality we are prepared to pay for. Their lenses come in three grades, Standard, Pro and Top Pro and cover the zoom range of 7-300mm which is 14-600 in 35mm equivalent terms. Of course, you can also get TCs to extend that range 1.4 or 2 times if you want. Apart from the Olympus digital lenses, you can also buy the Sigma 50-500 and in that case you have a full 70x zoom range from 7-500mm (14-1000mm) which should cover every need.

    But if that is still not enough you can turn to use manual film lenses, of course only in manual focus and aperture control mode is available with those. Having an Olympus means you can use almost any old film lenses, primes and zooms. A few exceptions are Minolta Rokkor and Canon lenses but about any other lens are OK. You even have Image stabilization for these lenses, since Olympus supports legacy lenses in that matter. Of course, metering works as well. In this case you can use all the fast primes as well, and actually even the modern digital Nikkor lenses can be used because these have focus and aperture rings.

    So, indeed the when it comes to lenses, I think the Olympus system is the most well equipped system, no other system gives you all that range. But not many sales men are able to give you that information, nor are they interested in giving a more unbiased view. They are interested in selling cameras with as little effort as possible, and selling a Canon or Nikon is normally easier.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    ... if I am not wrong a handful of the 4/3 lens that have a bigger F-stop (F1.x ~ F2.0)...
    Why 4/3 lenses has bigger f-stop than non 4/3? The answer is to make sure that the DOF relatively close to those bigger sensor.

    As we all know that the DOF (depth of field) in a smaller sensor is more compared to the DOF of a bigger sensor. Thus 4/3 lens f/1.4 will give more DOF compared to, for example, APS-C or full frame with the same f-stop.

    For example, in 4/3 sensor, you need maybe f/1.2 lens to mimic the DOF of APS-C sensor with f/1.4 aperture, or the DOF of a FF sensor with f/1.8 aperture

    This is one of the considering factor in choosing a body (based on sensor type) for portraiture, since in portraiture, most of the time we want to limit DOF, to give a good bokeh as a beckground, or even to do a selective focusing on the object itself. This is also the reason why most (if not all) pro in the portraiture world are using the medium format... Bigger sensor = smaller DOF = easier to do selective focusing.
    Achetez ce que vous souhaitez, pas ce que vous voulez...

  11. #31

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    hasselblad. medium format rocks!

  12. #32
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    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    portraits?
    capturing skin tone..i would go for the fujifilm s5pro
    The Few...The PROUD...

  13. #33

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    Quote Originally Posted by annihilus89 View Post
    hi guys,
    as the title says... i need recommendations on what is the leading brand for potraits photography ? i know its rather subjective.. but in another way, what is the brand that most ppl use for professional portrait photography ?
    !
    I should say that Brand is very subjective as most of the Hi-end Dslrs are equally good in their own field rather you should look into the type of lenses needed.

  14. #34

    Default Re: DSLR for Portrait Photography ?

    cant really conlude on what brand coz we haven't gathered data for that. csers only represent a percentage of photographers though.

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