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Thread: Aperture setting

  1. #1
    Snappy
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    Default Aperture setting

    I’m a little confused after reading some articles regarding apertures setting. I know that it can be set through the camera in AV priority or Manual mode. I’ve just realized that the lens can also be adjusted to lower the setting which commonly known as “stopping down”. Now I’m confused, lets say you’re using a 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 lens, and you want to shoot at f/16, what do you do? Adjust both the camera setting and the lens???

    I’ve also included a pix, could someone please explain to me what are those (arrowed A & B) functions for? Thanks.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy
    I’m a little confused after reading some articles regarding apertures setting. I know that it can be set through the camera in AV priority or Manual mode. I’ve just realized that the lens can also be adjusted to lower the setting which commonly known as “stopping down”. Now I’m confused, lets say you’re using a 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 lens, and you want to shoot at f/16, what do you do? Adjust both the camera setting and the lens???

    I’ve also included a pix, could someone please explain to me what are those (arrowed A & B) functions for? Thanks.

    I'm not sure what you are asking but I will try to answer your question. First of all, for Nikon lenses, you need to set the aperature ring to the largest F before it will work with the new bodies.

    The f/3.5-5.6 refers to the smallest apearture that the lens has at that particular setting. eg at 28mm, the largest F possible is f/3.5 and at 135mm the largest F possible is f/5.6. Thats what those values mean.

    So if you intend to shoot at f/16 in aperature prioirty or manual modes just adjust your aperature to the desired value. If in manual mode, you woudl have to set the corresponding shutter speed for a correct exposure. In aperature priority mode, the camera should calculate the corresponding value.

    There is no need to adjust the lens whatsoever. I beleive this should be the same for other brand cameras and lenses.

    As for the functions, A is the zoom? And B is for focusing? Not sure cos I don't use that lense....anyone?

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by coke21; 25th September 2003 at 04:05 PM.

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    pic shown is a Canon EF lens. i think for Canon lenses (prob for all EF mounts), there isn't aperture rings to be found (or at least i've not seen it, hehheh), so aperture control is solely dependent on the camera body. ring A shown in the pic is probably the focussing ring, and B is the focussing distance meter that will change accordingly with a twist in the focussing ring. the zoom ring is prob the thicker rubber ring nearer the front of the lens.

  4. #4
    Snappy
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    Ya, I’m referring to the aperture ring of the lens when I asked about the lens setting. I see, so Canon lens don't have aperture rings? Just set the camera to the desired aperture setting without setting the lens?

    By the way, the lens shown is the Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM. Anybody familiar with Canon lens please enlighten me. Thanks for everybody's help, I hope I'm noy confusing everyone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy
    I see, so Canon lens don't have aperture rings? Just set the camera to the desired aperture setting without setting the lens?

    By the way, the lens shown is the Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM. Anybody familiar with Canon lens please enlighten me. Thanks for everybody's help, I hope I'm noy confusing everyone.

    dont let the words on the lens scare you
    EF - electronic focus (autofocus)
    28 - 135 is the focal length (zoom in laypersons terms)
    f/3.5-5.6 is the largest apperture setting at the wide setting (f3.5@28mm) and the tele setting (5.6@135mm)
    notice that the maximum apperture is not constant throughout the zoom range...
    IS - image stabilizer
    usm - ultra sonic motor (for silent fast autofocusing)

    dont worry about the other terms but understand the focal length and aperture issues...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy
    Ya, Iím referring to the aperture ring of the lens when I asked about the lens setting. I see, so Canon lens don't have aperture rings? Just set the camera to the desired aperture setting without setting the lens?

    By the way, the lens shown is the Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM. Anybody familiar with Canon lens please enlighten me. Thanks for everybody's help, I hope I'm noy confusing everyone.
    Well, if the lens doesn't have an aperture ring, you can't do any aperture setting on the lens anyway. this means that all aperture settings have to be controlled from the body.

    not all cameras allow one to set the aperture from the bodies. i'm not sure about canon as i'm more used to the nikon system. the older AF bodies don't have this function, so you will have to set aperture from the lens. at any rate, i don't think there is a manufacturer who made a camera where one can set aperture from both body and lens. it's either set from the body alone or the lens alone. (those more knowledgeable, please correct me if i'm mistaken.)
    Today is a gift; that's why it's called the present.
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  7. #7

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    i am using the 28-135.. there's no aperture ring. A is a focus ring to do manual focussing if needed. The aperture has to be set from the body.

    Even Nikon is moving towards G lenses where it's set on the body too.

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    as far as i was told, it seems that canon is holding on to this patent of electronically controlling the aperture from the camera body, and nikon, to prevent getting sued, has two steps to allow AF/MF on their systems - a mode dial, and a M/S/C drive selector.

    canon EF lens ALL do not have aperture rings, only focus rings.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    as far as i was told, it seems that canon is holding on to this patent of electronically controlling the aperture from the camera body, and nikon, to prevent getting sued, has two steps to allow AF/MF on their systems - a mode dial, and a M/S/C drive selector.
    I'll be surprised if that was true.

    I don't seem to remember any aperture rings on Minolta lenses and I doubt that they are mechanically coupled like Nikon.

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