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Thread: Indoor shooting

  1. #1

    Default Indoor shooting

    I am using D90 with external flash. However, I have problems shooting indoor, such as ballroom, restaurants. The pictures always turn out under-exposed. I usually use P settings.

    Anyone can advise?

  2. #2
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by sgboy83 View Post
    I am using D90 with external flash. However, I have problems shooting indoor, such as ballroom, restaurants. The pictures always turn out under-exposed. I usually use P settings.

    Anyone can advise?
    How are you using the flash? Direct or bounced?

    Which mode of the flash are you using?

    This is actually a new area which you have to experiment more and try out with different settings. It's not easy to master it but you'll probably get the hang of it in time if you try out more. Also do consider trying in other modes.

    A or M
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  3. #3

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    I'm using SB-900... Mostly bounced.. Mode? TTL? Actually which mode is recommended for beginner?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Do you find that your shutter speed capped at 1/60s? Check your EXIF.

  5. #5
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by sgboy83 View Post
    I'm using SB-900... Mostly bounced.. Mode? TTL? Actually which mode is recommended for beginner?
    With TTL bounced, you'd most probably be able to get illumination only for the close range subjects.

    In such cases, you may need to open up the aperture more (use as large as possible) and also increase the ISO. Btw, what were the settings on these?
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  6. #6

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Yes. It's at 1/60s.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blur Shadow View Post
    Do you find that your shutter speed capped at 1/60s? Check your EXIF.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Aperture as large as possible - means the "f" as low as possible? Which means it's good to be on Aperture Priority for indoor shooting?

    The should I bounced flash or straight? If straight, will it hurt the target eyes? haha

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    With TTL bounced, you'd most probably be able to get illumination only for the close range subjects.

    In such cases, you may need to open up the aperture more (use as large as possible) and also increase the ISO. Btw, what were the settings on these?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Under exposed for background or face as well? This is crucial to determine where the problem is. You may want to up your iso between 800 to 1250. Don worry, d90 can take it one.
    D7100,SB910,17-50/2.8OS,105/2.8VR,85/1.8D,2xE-M1,O60/2.8,12-40/2.8,35-100/2.8,14-42,LX100

  9. #9

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Under exposed on the face as well....

    If ISO set between 800 and 1250, the picture will be 'noisy' right? What are the other methods?


    Quote Originally Posted by sin77 View Post
    Under exposed for background or face as well? This is crucial to determine where the problem is. You may want to up your iso between 800 to 1250. Don worry, d90 can take it one.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Just adding my noobie comments besides what other tips the people before me had mentioned.

    Use Aperture Priority. When you move your cam around the shutter speed will change according to the lighting condition at every angle your cam is with you in your hands. If you have been using your cam you will know usually at which shutter your cam may shake and cause blurr. In this condition up the flash power value of your speedlight to one notch or two. Your cam in A mode will automatically compensate and increase the shutter speed. Also differnt types of flash diffuser gives different types of effects on the skin tone - warm or cool you just choose which ever you may like. May want to check out Gary Fong's clips on how he markets his diffusers for some ideas on how they work.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Thanks. So what Aperture settings would you recommend? the "f" number as low as possible, eg. 3?

  12. #12

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    How much of the scene you want it to be in focus? A single subject, two, three, more in groups? Or do you know the sweet spot of your lens? Two stops or three or more down from the biggest? Or do you just want to use the biggest in the indoor condition? A snapshot a quick capture of a fleeting momoent you have time to change aperture?

  13. #13

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    I'm already confused with all the terms! single subject or more... it really depends on the event and situation.

    It's really tough.

    Quote Originally Posted by liarliar View Post
    How much of the scene you want it to be in focus? A single subject, two, three, more in groups? Or do you know the sweet spot of your lens? Two stops or three or more down from the biggest? Or do you just want to use the biggest in the indoor condition? A snapshot a quick capture of a fleeting momoent you have time to change aperture?

  14. #14

    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    The answer is there is no hard and fast setting to capture a shot - niether for a good shot. So just go practise and experienment with what others here pointed out. In time you will understand why. There is no short cut. and the advice many here had given had taken you many cuts short to save you troubles in WHAT to experience and how.
    Last edited by liarliar; 5th January 2009 at 10:10 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Indoor shooting

    Generally in indoor scenarios, it all depends on the amount of light available. If there is a decent amount of light, then I would consider bouncing the light.

    Else, direct flash with reduced flash ev settings would be my next choice.

    As for the ISO, aperture and shutter speed, this would depend on what my options are and how the scene is metered. If I have room and can hold the subjects stationary, then I would reduce the shutter speed. Else, I'd stick to the 1/60 and increase the aperture size and/or ISO.
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

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