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Thread: Do you remove caps when leaving equipment in dry cabinet?

  1. #1
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    Default Do you remove caps when leaving equipment in dry cabinet?

    Hi as above. If you do so, why? If you don't, why?

    Is it necessary to remove the caps when equipment are placed in the dry cabinet?

    My logic:
    Remove caps coz in that case then moisture won't accumulate. Is this logic wrong? Please kindly enlighten me if I'm wrong. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by chyeo
    Hi as above. If you do so, why? If you don't, why?

    Is it necessary to remove the caps when equipment are placed in the dry cabinet?

    My logic:
    Remove caps coz in that case then moisture won't accumulate. Is this logic wrong? Please kindly enlighten me if I'm wrong. Thanks.
    My logic is the other way around.
    Always put on caps. It will prevent fungus from the camera body (if any), spreading to other equipments don't know whether this is correct or not :P

  3. #3
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    From what i read,
    It says that when we shoot, we normally put the caps in bags or even pockets. (which i do). Moisture may get to the underside of the cap from our body perspiration. And when we recap, moist will be in contact with lens. (assuming no UV lens). Fungus might thus occur.

    But for me, i still put on the lens cap. But, with a cheap Hoya UV on as well.

    Hope that helps.

  4. #4
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    Thanks. Anymore opinions/advice?

  5. #5

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    Dun feel the need to remove the cap. The dry cabinet should 'dried up' any moisture from the cap cos the cap is not air sealed tight to the len

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeworld
    Dun feel the need to remove the cap. The dry cabinet should 'dried up' any moisture from the cap cos the cap is not air sealed tight to the len
    that's my thinking as well actually... also, the dry cabinet is not really dust-free (at least mine isn't...).

  7. #7
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    Let us go through your logic,

    If it is necessary to remove the front lens cap, then logically you should remove the rear lens cap too. And, logically you should remove the UV filters too.

    Now the question is, don't you think that your lens would be scratched sooner than any hint of fungus start appearing.

    If Fungus still can clean,

    If Lens is scratched then liao liao.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonpgc
    Let us go through your logic,

    If it is necessary to remove the front lens cap, then logically you should remove the rear lens cap too. And, logically you should remove the UV filters too.

    Now the question is, don't you think that your lens would be scratched sooner than any hint of fungus start appearing.

    If Fungus still can clean,

    If Lens is scratched then liao liao.
    Quite true. Thanks for the advice.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonpgc
    Let us go through your logic,

    If it is necessary to remove the front lens cap, then logically you should remove the rear lens cap too. And, logically you should remove the UV filters too.

    Now the question is, don't you think that your lens would be scratched sooner than any hint of fungus start appearing.

    If Fungus still can clean,

    If Lens is scratched then liao liao.
    Actually, you *should* remove all caps, esp the rear cap. On some lenses, the rear lens element will retract into the lens body, leaving BIG HOLE when you zoom the lens. This means that the rear end is highly "porous" to air. In which case, if you remove the cap, it helps any moist air to escape instead of being trapped. I suppose if your lens is the "sealed" design, it would not make much diff.

    Fungus can be cleaned ONLY if they are very light. Chances are that the fungus will eat into the lens coating, and cleaning it will remove the coating as well. The only cure is to replace the element. I had this done to my 80-200L/2.8 lens, at the cost of more than $400 ! Ouch ! I had a similar problem with my Sigma 28-70/2.8, but it was more of a manufacturing defect in which one of the element "fogs" up when exposed to moist air. Sigma was nice enough to charge me a norminal $50 to replace it out of good will. This Sigma was one of those "retracting rear elements" lens, and leaving the lens cap off might have avoided the problem in the first place.

    You are unlikely to scratch your lens elements as long as you are careful. After all, they are in your dry cab, not in your bag bouncing around.

  10. #10

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    the cap is not air tight i think so there is no need to remove it
    and with the cap on, it might prevent damage in cases when u knock ur lens when taking it out or puting it in from the cabinet

  11. #11

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    abit OT but can you use lense cleaning paper to clean the rear and front glass of your lenses ?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by myloplex
    abit OT but can you use lense cleaning paper to clean the rear and front glass of your lenses ?
    Can. But gently and be sure to blow off all dust before doing.

  13. #13
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    Default Hiee.....My uncles tips...

    HIee....

    I was told by my uncle to "PLAY" with the lens once in a while if you are not using it for say a week or so.....

    The more often you play with it it will be "less fungus prone".

    What is meant by "Playing with the lens".....??

    Playing with it means is to take it out of the dry-box and rotate the focus ring to create air movements in the lens cavity..... and if its a zoom.....extend and retract it.....then this will create air movements which will "prevent" fungus to stay put and build a "harbouring" area....and they start growing....

    Frankly speaking......if you use your lens often...and always take it out for shooting......it will make fungus growing less likely....

    But if you are the "Equipment Collectors" who only keep the lens and the number of time you use a lens in a month is less than the number of "fine hairs" on your third segment of your index finger ...then you nedd to Play with the lens more often.....

    EVEN IN A DRYBOX.....FUNGUS CAN GROW!!!!!

    So....prevention is better than cure......USE YOUR LENS AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE!!!!!


    rgds,
    me

  14. #14
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    Default

    Yo sulhan,

    thanks for the advice. I heard people saying that before. Hehe for me no need to worry coz my equipment are heavily utilized.

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