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Thread: b/w film recommendation for wedding photography

  1. #1
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    Default b/w film recommendation for wedding photography

    Been using kodak's tmax 100 for weddings. Am thinking of exploring other types of film for indoor and outdoor use. Your recommendation will be much appreciated

    Criteria :

    1. don't know how to rate film, so need to use the film as-is
    2. Must not be too grainy for 8X10 and 10X12 prints
    3. more realistic skin tones

    TIA!
    Last edited by kristlbel; 18th September 2003 at 04:39 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    you can give the ilford range a try. the delta professional series has very fine grain and excellent contrast. they also have a xp2 series which uses C41 processing. best of all, both are reasonably priced.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by gohfigure
    you can give the ilford range a try. the delta professional series has very fine grain and excellent contrast. they also have a xp2 series which uses C41 processing. best of all, both are reasonably priced.
    I would second the Ilford Delta range, Delta 400 and Delta 3200, being great choices for weddings. If you are worried about the grain, use Ilford HP5+ and push to ISO800, then make sure you develop it accordingly. If you are able to order Kodak Portra 400 BW which is a C41 film, that would be really great. Try ordering from B&H. Otherwise, here are my preferences, which you may find useful, in this order.
    1. Kodak Tri-X 400
    2. Ilford HP5+
    3. Ilford Delta 400 (too sharp for my liking, esp for portraits)
    4. Kodak T400CN or Ilford XP2 Super.
    Hope more peoples' opinions and preferences can help u decide your own chioce.
    http://jeremyalexanderphoto.zenfolio.com/
    JEREMY ALEXANDER PHOTOGRAPHY

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by icebooke
    I would second the Ilford Delta range, Delta 400 and Delta 3200, being great choices for weddings. If you are worried about the grain, use Ilford HP5+ and push to ISO800, then make sure you develop it accordingly. If you are able to order Kodak Portra 400 BW which is a C41 film, that would be really great. Try ordering from B&H. Otherwise, here are my preferences, which you may find useful, in this order.
    1. Kodak Tri-X 400
    2. Ilford HP5+
    3. Ilford Delta 400 (too sharp for my liking, esp for portraits)
    4. Kodak T400CN or Ilford XP2 Super.
    Hope more peoples' opinions and preferences can help u decide your own chioce.
    have you used kodak portra 400 bw before? the picture on the web site looks really impressive. it's sad they don't bring it in. i tend to get very little contrast with T400CN.

  5. #5
    andylee
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    Default B/w

    Hi there,

    I usually use HP-5 rate at ISO 320 and FP-4 rated at ISO 100. Both from Ilford. They gives me better midtones.........

  6. #6
    andylee
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    Quote Originally Posted by gohfigure
    have you used kodak portra 400 bw before? the picture on the web site looks really impressive. it's sad they don't bring it in. i tend to get very little contrast with T400CN.
    Used CN before but need to put red filters for more contrast........

  7. #7
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    Default

    thanks for the tips!

    seems like a lot of iso400 films recommendations here... will probably give ilford a try, particularly fp5. I did hear that ilford's grain isn't as 'bad' as kodak's.

    wouldn't go for anything that uses c41 processing now cos I kinda enjoy processing my own film :P

  8. #8
    andylee
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristlbel
    thanks for the tips!

    seems like a lot of iso400 films recommendations here... will probably give ilford a try, particularly fp5. I did hear that ilford's grain isn't as 'bad' as kodak's.

    wouldn't go for anything that uses c41 processing now cos I kinda enjoy processing my own film :P
    It's a nice feeling that you know that your film is safe in your hands rather than someone who never moniter the temp,correct timing etc.......

  9. #9
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    Default

    Don't know if it will help, but some books say you can use a yellow-green filter for more 'realistic' skin-tone rendition (in relation to how other colours turn out).

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