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Thread: Redevelop photos colours different from original?

  1. #1

    Default Redevelop photos colours different from original?

    My subject might be abit confusing, but couldn't think of a proper subject line.

    Went to redevelop some of the photos I took. They turned out to look different from the original ones. Different in terms of colours. The original ones are warmer and slightly more saturated. The redevelop ones turned out opposite. The original ones are developed in the same photo lab.

    Went to ask the people of the photo lab, then they say different day different outcome one.

    So it is the lab's fault? Or the first developed photos are always "optimised" better?

    Oh yah, btw its film, not digital.

  2. #2
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    almost certainly a problem with the lab, assuming your colour negative are not the problem.

    however, there are many conditions to get back the same outcome,

    1) chemicals used, if the chemicals are re-used (as most labs do, to save cost), you can be sure subsequent use will give poorer colour quality. if you know the timings that they change the chemical, .... well ....

    2) colour correction, most of the machine the labs use will do colour correction automatically, however, it might produce different outcome at different times. These corrections are printed as code on the back of the photo paper. You can provide your orginal photo as a sample, so that the lab can attempt to get back the same outcome.

    3) others, ... there might be many other factors that I didn't think of....

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by hangdog
    almost certainly a problem with the lab, assuming your colour negative are not the problem.

    however, there are many conditions to get back the same outcome,

    1) chemicals used, if the chemicals are re-used (as most labs do, to save cost), you can be sure subsequent use will give poorer colour quality. if you know the timings that they change the chemical, .... well ....

    2) colour correction, most of the machine the labs use will do colour correction automatically, however, it might produce different outcome at different times. These corrections are printed as code on the back of the photo paper. You can provide your orginal photo as a sample, so that the lab can attempt to get back the same outcome.

    3) others, ... there might be many other factors that I didn't think of....
    Thanks for your useful information. Wasn't aware of these factors and also I seldom redevelop my photos.

    So redeveloping of photos sometimes depends on luck isnt it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by hangdog
    2) colour correction, most of the machine the labs use will do colour correction automatically, however, it might produce different outcome at different times. These corrections are printed as code on the back of the photo paper. You can provide your orginal photo as a sample, so that the lab can attempt to get back the same outcome.
    I don't believe you can do colour correction on negatives unless it is a digital lab which digitize your negatives first.

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    hangdogptical machine are able to correct colors for film by using filters like YMC during exposure.
    the chemicals lab use do not get changed thoroughly everytime,they replenish the working tank with new one constantly..

    Pr0t0type:nx time u want to the same results,it is best to bring the original there for the lab guys.

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    i meant linse instead of hangdog

  7. #7

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    agree with Kex, i always hand in my original ones together with the film for re-develop so that the lab has a reference. It is very common that the colour tones of the re-developed photos is different even from the same lab and same person.

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