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Thread: Taking pictures behind the glass/plastic

  1. #1

    Default Taking pictures behind the glass/plastic

    Hi guys, just wondering how you guys will take pictures if your subject and you has a piece of glass/plastic between you??

    I know that focusing near to the glass/plastic helps but sometimes I find that there's still some softness in the picture.... the cleanliness of the glass/plastic is important as well?

    Also it's worse if it's a low light situation... the picture will turn out very grainy like what I have here..



    Besides digital post processing, is there any other way? There's no way to use flash in these low light situations? I tried that and of course there's reflection on the glass/plastic that will come out in the picture as well..

    Last edited by bja; 12th September 2003 at 02:27 PM.

  2. #2
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    Move closer to the glass/plastic, the grain effect cause by the dirty glass/plastic wil be relatively lower, If you are already sticking your face flat on the glass, opening the aperture or increasing the focal length can help too.
    Last edited by jasonpgc; 12th September 2003 at 03:31 PM.

  3. #3
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    press the lens against the glass or plastic. the reflection comes from stray light thats comming from the sides. you can also use a polarising filter.

  4. #4
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    Actually for low light, in some instances, u have to use the flash regardless.... e.g. the penguin enclosure in the bird park..... otherwise the eye area of the penguins will be just a black mass..... in such a situation, the reflection of the flash will ruin the picture? So how? Can we stick the lens flat on the glass and then fire the flash... will the flash fast enough for the film plane to capture the burst before the shutter closes? And will the TTL metering by the flash be accurate?

  5. #5

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    Go close to the glass, use a large aperature.

    For flash, bounce off the ceiling or use a piece of cardboard to block the flash from bouncing off the glass into the lens.

    If subject is far from the glass and I use a long lens, I use a modified flash extender (with a cardboard at the bottom) to direct the flash through the glass and the cardboard to minimise reflection to the lens.

  6. #6

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    move either the camera or the flash against the glass... from the pic, you can see that the glass isn't completely clean..oops.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by showtime
    press the lens against the glass or plastic. the reflection comes from stray light thats comming from the sides. you can also use a polarising filter.
    Hmmmm but using the polarising filter will cut more light and make it even harder for the lens to focus rite? hmmmm I already have a UV filter that is _supposed_ to cut down on reflections.... but......

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by willyfoo
    Go close to the glass, use a large aperature.

    For flash, bounce off the ceiling or use a piece of cardboard to block the flash from bouncing off the glass into the lens.

    If subject is far from the glass and I use a long lens, I use a modified flash extender (with a cardboard at the bottom) to direct the flash through the glass and the cardboard to minimise reflection to the lens.
    hhmmm might be abit hard for both lens and flash to "stick" to the glass right? especially if the lens is a long one.... then the flash will be reflected on top (which was what happened to me alot of times )
    Most of the time got no ceiling to bounce too leh....

    maybe i need to go even closer to the glass/plastic hhmmmmmm

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by erwinx



    move either the camera or the flash against the glass... from the pic, you can see that the glass isn't completely clean..oops.
    ehh?? really? I thot this picture is quite good already.... well good enough for me at least....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bja
    Hmmmm but using the polarising filter will cut more light and make it even harder for the lens to focus rite? hmmmm I already have a UV filter that is _supposed_ to cut down on reflections.... but......
    A high quality UV filter cuts down refections ON THE FILTER, not from the subject. A polariser cuts reflections from the subject (ie your glass surface).

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by ST1100
    A high quality UV filter cuts down refections ON THE FILTER, not from the subject. A polariser cuts reflections from the subject (ie your glass surface).
    ooooo okay... hee no wonder.... so there is a difference between the UV and polariser... hmmm
    I guess I'll try to "stick" my lens and flash closer to see if it works and try the polariser thingie if it still doesn't.....

    Thanks guys for all ur replies!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bja
    Hmmmm but using the polarising filter will cut more light and make it even harder for the lens to focus rite? hmmmm I already have a UV filter that is _supposed_ to cut down on reflections.... but......
    its a special uv filter that you have?
    multicoated uv filters like hoya hmc and the like cut reflections of the lens filter eliminating possible flare and ghosting. but reflections of another piece of glaess such as the fish tank is another story.

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