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Thread: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

  1. #1
    Senior Member JC1808's Avatar
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    Default Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Newbie question regards to macro lens
    =============================

    Just want to find out the below close-up pic I took using a macro lens (pure macro lens without attach with any extension tube/magification filter...etc.) is this the standard closer I can get to? (If I go nearer cant focus, all blur).

    Pic taken using Tokina 100mm AT-X 1: 2.8 AF 100 MARCO lens.


    Just wandering and concern how come insects that I took always look far and small even I tried to get as near as my lens can focus. Is it that I do not use the macro lens correctly?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Leong23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Blur image can be cause by motion blur or shallow Depth-of field.

    All macro-lens can achieve 1:1 magnification rate in respect to your sensor size.

    Example of 1:1, taken using Nikon DX sensor, uncropped photo.


  3. #3
    Senior Member JC1808's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Leong23 View Post
    Blur image can be cause by motion blur or shallow Depth-of field.
    Hi Leong23,

    The blur that I'm referring to is not either a motion blur or shallow depth-of field, what I try to said is like when I was taking the coin the nearest I can focus sharp and shoot is what it show in the pic. But If I'm going to get closer/nearer, the lens cant get any focusing (I'm referring to manual focusing).

    Maybe can you take a pic of the $1 coin too, more easy for me to see any different from mine 1:1

  4. #4

    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    A 1:1 magnification ratio means the image that is projected on your sensor or film is the same size as the subjecet. For example the top of a 1 dollar coin has a top with a area measuring 1 cm square. The image projected on your sensor or film is also 1 cm square, thus the subject would appear very big on the monitor.

    OT theres this canon marco lens that has a 5:1 magnification ratio! meaning its 5X as big!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Leong23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Very simple.

    Since you are using Nikon D90.

    Draw a rectangle of 23.6mm x 15.8 mm on a paper and place your $1 coin on it.

    You will able to see how big the image will be.

  6. #6
    Senior Member JC1808's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Quote Originally Posted by doom102938 View Post
    A 1:1 magnification ratio means the image that is projected on your sensor or film is the same size as the subjecet.
    Quote Originally Posted by Leong23 View Post
    Very simple.

    Since you are using Nikon D90.

    Draw a rectangle of 23.6mm x 15.8 mm on a paper and place your $1 coin on it.
    Hi doom1029838 & Leong23,

    Thanks for the explanation, hmmm I understand about that 1:1, Below pic i took and that is the nearest my lens can shoot (no crop), but somehow....ppl keep telling me I can get even more nearer/close up shooting of the suject with a macro lens without any additional add-on gear... Is that possible?



    Sorry if I wasting all of your time....just always lot of questions will raise by a newbie...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Leong23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Quote Originally Posted by JC1808 View Post
    Hi doom1029838 & Leong23,

    Thanks for the explanation, hmmm I understand about that 1:1, Below pic i took and that is the nearest my lens can shoot (no crop), but somehow....ppl keep telling me I can get even more nearer/close up shooting of the suject with a macro lens without any additional add-on gear... Is that possible?

    Sorry if I wasting all of your time....just always lot of questions will raise by a newbie...
    Yes....you can go a lot closer.

    From your image, i can't really see what species of DF, but confirm that it is under Libellulidae (Skimmer) Family. For skimmer, the wing span can be easily 50mm or more.
    Therefore, just compare the size of you image with mine, you will roughly know how close can you go.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    JC, do the following:

    > turn off AF and go manual
    > set lens to shortest focal distance
    > move towards dragonfly until in focus, you should see the head and some part of wing

    in the photo above you do not seem at closest focus distance. further more i notice the the focal plane is behind the head, part of the wind and the legs seem to be in focus, the head is not and the body is also not
    Never forget rule 5
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  9. #9
    Senior Member JC1808's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    JC, do the following:

    > turn off AF and go manual
    > set lens to shortest focal distance
    > move towards dragonfly until in focus, you should see the head and some part of wing

    Hi Michael & Leong23,

    Thanks for the time to read thru my post..... Actually that is the main question I am asking "Why I cant get nearest to the object"...is it I dont know how to use the macro lens or what actually going on.

    > turn off AF and go manual
    * photo taken are all in Manual mode (body and lens)

    > set lens to shortest focal distance
    *what is the shortest focal distance mean? My lens is a 100mm. Can still set lens to shorest focal distance?

    > move towards dragonfly until in focus, you should see the head and some part of wing
    * I already moved towards the dragonfly until in focus.... that's why I do not understand why that is the nearest distance I can get to.

  10. #10
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Hi.

    This lens has a closest focusing distance of 0.30m from the subject to the sensor plane.

    This distance is the limit for this particular lens unless you add on extension tubes or CU filters. thus your 1:1 magnification is limited to this range.

    With my Tamron 90, I get a 23cm focusing distance to reach 1:1
    With the Nikkor 105 VR, the closest focusing distance is 31cm to reach 1:1

    But note that this distance of front of the lens element to the subject may be different due to the length of the lens when fully extended. The nikkor is IF, thus does not extend.

    Whereas, both the Tamron and Tokina extends the front element to get the macro capabilities...
    Michael Lim
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Question about Tokina 100mm Macro lens

    Thanks for the time to read thru my post..... Actually that is the main question I am asking "Why I cant get nearest to the object"...is it I dont know how to use the macro lens or what actually going on.
    time to join a macro outing.

    > set lens to shortest focal distance
    *what is the shortest focal distance mean? My lens is a 100mm. Can still set lens to shorest focal distance?
    100mm is the focal length of the lens. Check the focus scale on the lens turn it all the way until you see the indicator for 30cm
    > move towards dragonfly until in focus, you should see the head and some part of wing
    * I already moved towards the dragonfly until in focus.... that's why I do not understand why that is the nearest distance I can get to.[/quote]
    when you move into your subject and it is in focus check what the distance from subject to camera is... an if it matches the shortest focus distance
    Never forget rule 5
    My Flickr

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