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Thread: Blue sky.

  1. #1
    Marty79
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    Question Blue sky.

    I would like to welcome myself first of all. Im so happy about this site thanks to my mother. anyway, this could have an easy answer, but im a newbe so i can get away with it. how do u keep blue sky, BLUE in a photo?

  2. #2

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    Welcome to ClubSNAP
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty79
    how do u keep blue sky, BLUE in a photo?
    By exposing it correctly. If the sky is medium blue, just do spot/partial metering on the sky using Av or Tv, use that meter reading, recompose and shoot. If you want to make it darker, just increase the shutter speed or increase the aperture value. Alternatively, you may use circular polarizer filter to enhance the blue sky's color.

    Welcome to CS!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty79
    how do u keep blue sky, BLUE in a photo?
    I usually either use a circular polariser and turn it till I get the hue I want or either that, I will under-expose the shot 1-2 stops.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    I usually either use a circular polariser and turn it till I get the hue I want or either that, I will under-expose the shot 1-2 stops.
    but wat if i'm shooting a building with a blue sky as background? if i use a polariser and under expose it, wat will happ to the building, even if i will get a BLUE sky ???

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by West_ray
    but wat if i'm shooting a building with a blue sky as background? if i use a polariser and under expose it, wat will happ to the building, even if i will get a BLUE sky ???
    I guess it really deepnds on what you want from the picture.

    So what would you do?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty79
    I would like to welcome myself first of all. Im so happy about this site thanks to my mother. anyway, this could have an easy answer, but im a newbe so i can get away with it. how do u keep blue sky, BLUE in a photo?
    Hey, Welcome to Clubsnap. It's pretty cool to know that your mother encourages your passion and introduces you to great sites like these.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  8. #8
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    the sky most blue at 90'angle to the sun!you will see that when in morning or evening the whole sky is very blue or abt 10am if you point one hand at the sun the other hand 90' at west sky that is the most blue area!

  9. #9

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    If you want both blue skies and properly exposed foreground. You can take 2 pics, 1 exposed for sky and 1 for foreground and combine them in photoshop

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by reno77
    If you want both blue skies and properly exposed foreground. You can take 2 pics, 1 exposed for sky and 1 for foreground and combine them in photoshop

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by reno77
    If you want both blue skies and properly exposed foreground. You can take 2 pics, 1 exposed for sky and 1 for foreground and combine them in photoshop
    nah nahz ... prefer not to involved ps ...

  12. #12

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    polarizer seems to work, bought mine yesterday.. gave the picture a very slightly darker overall and a deeper blue sky.. dunno if i can do the same with -1 stop exposure. Try on a sunny day with "puffy" clouds, interesting results..

  13. #13

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    Polarizers let you deepen and intensify blue skies, achieve vibrant color saturation, reduce or eliminate glare and reflections from non-metallic objects and glass surfaces, and minimize haze in both color and black-and-white photography. They can be rotated to determine the amount of reflection to be removed. Rotate the polarizer to change blue sky densities from light to dark blue. Create dramatic contrast between blue skies and white clouds.

    Standard linear polarizers are used with many cameras, while the circular polarizer is used on cameras with beam splitting metering systems commonly found on automatic SLR and autofocus cameras. Check your camera manual for the metering system employed. A circular polarizer can be effectively used with all cameras.

    You can, in all cases, see the effect through the filter.
    Hope this helps all newbies like me.

    Here's a better, more comprehensive article on polarizers..
    PoLaRiZeRs
    Last edited by sk_online; 15th September 2003 at 08:49 AM.

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