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Thread: Metering tips for 10D

  1. #21

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    I suggest you try shooting in maunal mode and different settings and see the result for yourself. Since u have a 10D then it makes it even easier to shoot and learn rather then trying to figure out wat is wat. Read the manual and the advise it think it has aldy sufficently cover the aspect of manual mode.

    furthermore if u are the main photographer for your friend wedding i would urge u to understand and pratice it even faster since i think u do not wish to screw up his wedding shots as well. Wedding/events mostly are shot will manual mode althought there are people tat shoot in "P" aka pro mode .. kekeke.

    Just my 2 cents

  2. #22

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    ok myloplex, I assumed that you knew at least what "exposure" means, and you were just asking a silly question. It seems that you don't know what exposure is all about. I shall try to be as comprehensive as possible:

    You know that exposure by the camera is determined by aperture, shutter speed, and ISO right? Ok, the camera also has this nice gadget called a light meter which will analyse the scene and tell you what it thinks is the right exposure (i.e. combination of aperture, shutter speed) to use. When you shoot in Av, the light meter analyses the scene, takes a look at which aperture you chose, and selects the shutter speed it thinks is the right one. When you shoot in Tv, the opposite, it tells you which aperture to use for the right exposure.

    When you do exposure compensation, you are trying to override what the light meter thinks. For e.g. your snow scene. Because snow reflects more light, the light meter will tend to underexpose. You know that'll happen, so you dial in a +1 exposure compensation. Now you're telling the camera, hey I don't trust you, I want you to increase exposure by 1 stop. Meaning, if the camera meters f4.0, 1/60s, after you do +1 compensation, the camera will snap at f4.0, 1/30s instead.

    So exposure compensation and the aperture/shutter combi are closely related; they are not separate entities. So if you follow that logic, in M mode you select the aperture and shutter speed yourself. Means, you totally ignore the meter. The meter still shows you what the metering thinks though, by showing you +how much and -how much on the exposure bar. That bar tells you that if you take at the current combi of aperture and shutter speed, how much different will it be from what the light meter thinks. But remember, light meter is not always right. That's why some people use M mode instead.

    So in M mode, it is senseless to use AE lock. Why? Cos there is no AE, you are determining the exposure yourself by selecting the shutter speed and aperture yourself!

    I hope this explanation is clear enough. If your still don't understand, I really don't know how to help already. And please TRY to understand how things work rather than blindly remembering steps. All those rules you got from the net, like for what situations use +- whatever, are all very rough rules. It helps better if you understand the concept behind exposure, the reason and theory behind why +- so much, and do your own experimentations and trials. This advice applies everywhere, esp in science and engineering: understand what you are trying to do, rather than following instructions blindly.

    Please practice and practice before the wedding and know exactly what to do. If you're not confident, I'd suggest you turn the knob to the little green box to avoid disappointment from your friend.

    Good luck

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by myloplex
    You focus on an area your exposure indicator can be "0" but if you recompose the shot the exposure indicator will change mah ...then how ?
    sorrie ah I just saw this. You asked "Then How?" Then bl**dy change the aperture/shutter settings yourself to suit that recomposed scene lah! Remember, in M mode, YOU are the light meter. The exposure indicator only tells you what the camera meter thinks. If you rely on the camera meter so much, then for goodness sake don't use M, just use Av or Tv!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweek
    sorrie ah I just saw this. You asked "Then How?" Then bl**dy change the aperture/shutter settings yourself to suit that recomposed scene lah! Remember, in M mode, YOU are the light meter. The exposure indicator only tells you what the camera meter thinks. If you rely on the camera meter so much, then for goodness sake don't use M, just use Av or Tv!
    might i suggest something better? and i'll be frank about it..

    use PROGRAMME mode..

    i'm not a canon user,.. but from what do know, the canon matrix metering system will pretty cover your ass for most situations..

    if however, even while using programme mode, u still screw up, you should seriously considering writing a long letter of apology to your friend for the bad pictures.. and BEG his forgiveness..

    the OTHER alternative, would be to engage a professional photog who knows his/her work..

    cos if u had bought the 10d just for thie wedding, the money could have been much better spent on engaging a photog..

    NOTE> having the best n newest equipment does not make u a better photog..

    -jar0n

  5. #25

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    jaron, i fully agree, that's why I suggested he use the small green box: full auto mode on EOS cameras. Oh btw Canon doesn't have matrix metering, that's Nikon's baby. Canon does with evaluative metering, which well, sometimes doesn't work very well for certain scenes.

  6. #26
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    wah Tweek, relak a little lar

    myoplex, why don't you chimp durnig shots? ask the couple to hold on there until your chimped shot looks ok and move on...

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweek
    jaron, i fully agree, that's why I suggested he use the small green box: full auto mode on EOS cameras. Oh btw Canon doesn't have matrix metering, that's Nikon's baby. Canon does with evaluative metering, which well, sometimes doesn't work very well for certain scenes.
    oopx.. my bad.. nothing even close to matrix? whoaaa..

    nikon GOOT!! ehhe..

    anyhows, back to the subject at hand..

    MYOPLEX>>> GOOD LUCK WITH THE WEDDING SHOOT.. =p

    -jar0n

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweek
    ok myloplex, I assumed that you knew at least what "exposure" means, and you were just asking a silly question. It seems that you don't know what exposure is all about. I shall try to be as comprehensive as possible:

    You know that exposure by the camera is determined by aperture, shutter speed, and ISO right? Ok, the camera also has this nice gadget called a light meter which will analyse the scene and tell you what it thinks is the right exposure (i.e. combination of aperture, shutter speed) to use. When you shoot in Av, the light meter analyses the scene, takes a look at which aperture you chose, and selects the shutter speed it thinks is the right one. When you shoot in Tv, the opposite, it tells you which aperture to use for the right exposure.

    When you do exposure compensation, you are trying to override what the light meter thinks. For e.g. your snow scene. Because snow reflects more light, the light meter will tend to underexpose. You know that'll happen, so you dial in a +1 exposure compensation. Now you're telling the camera, hey I don't trust you, I want you to increase exposure by 1 stop. Meaning, if the camera meters f4.0, 1/60s, after you do +1 compensation, the camera will snap at f4.0, 1/30s instead.

    So exposure compensation and the aperture/shutter combi are closely related; they are not separate entities. So if you follow that logic, in M mode you select the aperture and shutter speed yourself. Means, you totally ignore the meter. The meter still shows you what the metering thinks though, by showing you +how much and -how much on the exposure bar. That bar tells you that if you take at the current combi of aperture and shutter speed, how much different will it be from what the light meter thinks. But remember, light meter is not always right. That's why some people use M mode instead.

    So in M mode, it is senseless to use AE lock. Why? Cos there is no AE, you are determining the exposure yourself by selecting the shutter speed and aperture yourself!

    I hope this explanation is clear enough. If your still don't understand, I really don't know how to help already. And please TRY to understand how things work rather than blindly remembering steps. All those rules you got from the net, like for what situations use +- whatever, are all very rough rules. It helps better if you understand the concept behind exposure, the reason and theory behind why +- so much, and do your own experimentations and trials. This advice applies everywhere, esp in science and engineering: understand what you are trying to do, rather than following instructions blindly.

    Please practice and practice before the wedding and know exactly what to do. If you're not confident, I'd suggest you turn the knob to the little green box to avoid disappointment from your friend.

    Good luck
    fully understand:
    e.g
    AV mode f4 1/60 you compensate Ev +1 .. you get f4 1/30
    So does this mean you will be more prone to camera shake when you press the shutter button since you Ev +1 and your shutter is 1/30 instead or 1/60 ?

    Does Flash EV affect shutter/apeture speed ?
    Last edited by myloplex; 4th September 2003 at 11:19 PM.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by myloplex
    So does this mean you will be more prone to camera shake when you press the shutter button since you Ev +1 and your shutter is 1/30 instead or 1/60 ?
    YES

    Quote Originally Posted by myloplex
    Does Flash EV affect shutter/apeture speed?
    NO

  10. #30

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    Tweek, I really have to commend you for your patience so far.. but I fear you're fighting a lost cause here..

    sehsuan, I'd like you to try chimping your shots when the couple's parents, relatives, friends, and all the invited guests in the ballroom are staring at you and wondering what you're doing holding up the proceedings.

  11. #31
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    nah, was suggesting to myoplex to chimp for the more essential shots to make sure at least they aren't overexposed. since his 10d also can allow him to see a quick review for each shot taken... it may be useful...

  12. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    nah, was suggesting to myoplex to chimp for the more essential shots to make sure at least they aren't overexposed. since his 10d also can allow him to see a quick review for each shot taken... it may be useful...

    I think u miss a huge point wat YS is saying. Just imageing you walking down the stretch and the photographer keep asking u to hold and does the chimping thing.....

    Sorry to say this if this is in US i will throw the bugger and sue the bugger till his pants drop for screwing up the wedding shots which he will b definately as hell NO 1 is gonna stop during it.

  13. #33
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    i understand what YSLee was saying the first time round la. the practiced photographer will "one-shot-one-kill" instead of "many-shot-still-can't-kill". i was highlighting that in case myoplex just *had* to die-die confirm the photo isn't a goner, he can use the quick-chimping..

    not even using the quick review that immediately appears on screen after taking an impt shot, for him who isn't that ready yet?

    i don't chimp (thankfully) because i shoot in the day - and sad to say, my composition is still vastly lacking

  14. #34

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    Er...

    Sorry to be mean, but guess if it's my wedding, I'll be real ashame of myself if my relatives go squeaking about how come the "professional photographer" I hired needs to check his LCD after every shots, and everyone will have to wait for him.


  15. #35

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    Read the Full Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffgoh
    sorry ot but wat does it mean by RTFM??

  16. #36

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    I never said one shot one kill, please read my post carefully. I implied that no photographer worth his salt hold up the proceedings of a wedding ceremony.

  17. #37
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    aiyah, not putting words in your mouth la.

    what i'm trying to imply is, most paid wedding photogs i've seen do the "one shot one kill" style, and very rarely shoot 2 frames to be on the safe side.

    and yes, i understand that the wedding photog can't be saying "WAIT! lemme check my lcd and histogram first..."

    relax a bit lar...

  18. #38

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    Thank you all for your help and ability to 'tahan' me

    I just picked up photography less than 4 months.

    Before that was using those point and shoot compact digital camera.
    Didn't even know what exposure was and taught flash could shoot damn far.

    Went on only around a 2 photo outings since. Hardly really shoot anything coz of work and time lor. So recently coz of wedding just try to abosorb any photo tips ... then become confused liao and start asking stupid questions.

    So.. hope you all can 'forgive' me

  19. #39

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    Sehsuan, remember what I told you before some time back? Keep that in mind.

    Most paid wedding photogs don't do multiple frames because a vast majority are still shooting film, hence they strive to lower their costs with all possible means. This includes getting the shot right the first time.

    But I wasn't referring to shooting a frame per scene, I was referring to your original suggestion, which, I will quote:

    ask the couple to hold on there until your chimped shot looks ok and move on...
    Now, if my intrepretative skills haven't failed me yet, you did tell our dear friend here to tell the couple to hold on there, which would mean not moving while posing for the shot till he gets the shot right after reviewing a few settings.

    To which I replied that all the guests will wonder why the photog is holding up the ceremony/dinner. Not a very nice situation.

    You then go on about one-shot kills, which I certainly wasn't saying, then go on to say he can do "quick chimping" (whatever that means; chimping will take a few precious seconds no matter how fast, which is a killer during the most important moments).

    Now, you say that you understand that the wedding photog can't be saying that he has to check his LCD first.

    How to relax when you're bending logic in such a perverse way?
    Last edited by YSLee; 5th September 2003 at 12:37 AM.

  20. #40
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    aiyah, i give up la. my angmoh no good

    explain so many times, still get misunderstood.

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