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Thread: Information and Practical Suggestions to working as Models & Photographers

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    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Arrow Information and Practical Suggestions to working as Models & Photographers

    THIS IS A SHARING THREAD FROM ME TO WORKING MODELS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS.... more stuff for photographers at the bottom...

    FOR MODELS: [THE FREELACING MODEL]

    Modeling is a JOB...

    Writing this to serve more as a "practical" guideline rather than to change the market in anyway.... and given recently there's been numerous post about how much one should charge/ how much one should pay... i figured i'd give my few cents on what I think is logical..

    I've mentioned the practicalities of modeling to a fair number of ladies that came by my place as guests and partly, just to let everyone know that modeling isnt all that lucrative a job... (not unless your endorsements starts coming in). This topic is really for numerous ladies in clubsnap that havent the least idea how much to bill...

    Some issues i find interesting.

    1. Here's a general idea of how much you'll need to earn to sustain yourself (a decent living standard) locally.. assuming u're self employed and working for a living

    15-20 - $1500/month ave.
    20-25 - $2000/month ave.
    25-35 - $3000/month ave.
    35-50 - $4500/month ave.

    That's about what i feel is minimal, if you want to be a freelance model ( i feel it's only sensible to add a fair amount to that minimum price / since modeling is "supposed" to be a glam job and hey.. if u wanna earn this little, u might as well take on an administrative job.

    so for the majority of young female models here, at 18-23 years of age, you really should go for a min. $3000 salary a month (also consider, a model's commercial shelf live is pretty limited, i'd say 30ish for most... by that time, you'll want to have earned enough to do something more tangible... run a boutique, spa.. watever.. so. if u're not hitting your 3k salary a month... *Seriously* consider changing careers and do hospitality with a major hotel or something...

    here's more interesting stuff..

    how we usually calculate hourly rates goes something like this (this is one of the standard advertising formulas we use):

    (Annual Salary) divided by (Total productive work hours in a year) + ave Overhead cost (transport/living cost/necessities blah) + Commercial Profit

    = 36000 (salary x 12mnth) / 1600 (80% of 2080 hours) x OH multiplier 3x+ 25% profit
    = 22.5 x 3 + 25%
    = $84.375/hour

    not alot of money considering your immense Overheads like makeup and accessories/hair and pedicure visits and of course your monthly overheads... in fact, $85 dollars after all the hoohaaa... u only end up with an extremely small profit margin... it's only wise to crank it up to $100 - $150 dollars/hr.

    [ AGENCY vs FREELANCE ]

    With an agency, it might look lucrative - $2500 for 8+1 hours (or about $270/hr) but considering how much agency draw from media/loading fees (anything from 2k-15k for media usage rights), I'm led to believe the per hour cost of using their models (and the agency of course) runs into the thousands/hr.. logical since it's a viable business model.

    So a freelance model? what's $150/hr compared to $1500/hr to a client.. There's absolutely no reason to do anything for less than what you're worth..

    NOW here's the big issue in the forums..

    We've lots of models that want to earn lucrative monies but dont have what it takes to be a full-time model... to further add, a HUGE percentage of photographers here dont even shoot commercially... so why would they pay $150/hr for you....In other words... you're simply in the wrong market segment.. or section rather- That said... if modeling is a part-time job or passion.. I suppose it's fine to bill whatever you feel you're worth...(remember, $100/hr and you'll need to get 30 hours worth of jobs a month or you dont hit your $3k... and if you dont hit $3k.... might as well get a stable(r) admin job..

    Modeling is a self employed job. You are what you think you're worth...

    Next: Some things to consider if you're beautiful and want to climb up in value...
    Last edited by ejunlow; 13th November 2008 at 01:27 AM.
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    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    FOR MODELS: [ Increasing Value ]

    TFCD's the way most models think of increasing their portfolio. However, PORTFOLIO doesn't equates to Value unless it's a GOOD portfolio...

    Some interesting things to understand!

    1. Majority of Photographers here are probably hobbyist / amatuer photographers

    2. Commercial Photographers (doing well) wont ever need to shoot an amatuer model

    3. Commercial Photographers time cost easily run into the hundreds.... doesnt make sense for them to shoot a budding model unless you've got something really special about you... Some do, and that's why it's paramount you know WHAT to look out for in a TFCD shoot.

    For starters... Use this as a guideline....

    If you are worth $150/hr ....and you go meet a new photographer, shoot on location standing in the sun for 2 hours, badly exposed images, less-than-worthy imaging.... you've just thrown away a potential $300 money-making oppurtunity.

    on the other end of the scale...

    If you are worth the same $150/hr and you find a good commercial fashion photog that usually bills $800/hr... you would have got a great steal in the same 2 hours of shoot...

    and figure what those images can do for you..... when it's obvious that models and photographers gain recognition pretty much by collaborating with each other.... So you have a choice... Find a poor lensmen and waste time and oppurtunity... or find a good photographer that knows what he's doing... (that's if u can get him to do TF work with you)

    Now, so how do you go about asking a good photographer to help??.... here's some things that's good to know...

    1. Portrait Posing fundamentals ( there's TONs of books out there... for investments of $100ish dollars for a couple of good ones, you'll instantly gain access to how the human anatomy looks in its best.

    2. Lighting fundamentels.... I always think it's a great idea models learn something about photography....and obviously, camera equipment... One big drawback of new models is the inexperience factor... when you're surrounded by dozens of strobes, u'll definately break under pressure.... if you know what all the lights do.... where's the keylights, filllights, kicklights... blah blah... u'll naturally feel more confident in your photographer and your poses... because u know what's going on..

    3. Invest in yourself.. Modeling is a career... any career needs time and money invested... Go facial, go pedicure and go do your hair treatments... and honestly... Make looking good looking GREAT.

    4. Know yourself .... Know what attributes.. what's your potential segment in photography... whether you suit editorial or advertorial works... and of course... know where and when you look bad... ( true.... Art Directors and Photographers are suppose to be in charged on this... but hey... if you can save them the trouble... u're a BONUS)

    5. Communication.... is your lifeblood.... You dont become rich because you're pretty.. you become rich because you know how to tell people you're pretty....

    Having these attributes is great... and it definately appeals to Photographers when they want to do new works for portfolio or for experimenting... and really..... A good photographer knows how to say NO if you arent good enough.... and will definately APPRECIATE someone who's out there to learn the ropes.... provided he's available.

    NEXT: Marketing Yourself.... in clubsnap
    Last edited by ejunlow; 12th November 2008 at 06:16 PM.
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    i tink most models should read this n suck up ur knowledge

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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    make sure mod sticky this.

    and maybe ur upcoming thread. or maybe u can open a workshop

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    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    FOR MODELS: [ Exposing Yourself... ]

    I feel experience can only be learnt when you're learning with someone who knows what he/she's doing... and certainly, learning how to work your way to be a portrait/fashion model is definately not as easy as just looking beautiful... Here's some methods which i feel crucial in exposing yourselves..

    1. Tact/Respect

    When you are a model (freelance/otherwise), it's paramount your character is something that people want to associate well with... and ill mannered models will certainly be talked about for ages to come.... Regardless how pretty you might be, having respect for yourself and talking tactfully during conversations is paramount to becoming a successful model... and certainly a successful individual...

    2. Portfolio

    Once you've got that personality that makes people drawn to you.... Your portfolio is your BIGGEST draw to money-paying clients.... Freelance models need to be vocal about what they can do and what clients can expect... you are selling yourself and your images arent everything.... If your client can pay for images, they probably would have gone straight for a agency model..

    Good things to include in your portfolio/blog/writeup:

    1. Experiences (be specific... what you were tasked to showcase, what event it was, who's the clientele and when it happened)

    2. Personality "write-up".... anything you write speaks a lot about what you feel... and certainly, people can tell your personality from a passage as short as 50 words... Make them feel you're confident and competant, what you're capable of, comfortable with and certainly what you expect from the experience as well..

    3. Treat money Practically - State your rates as though you're reciting the national pledge... You need to know what you're worth, why you're worth it and if negotiations are allowed... specifically state WHY you allow for it... (example: should make-up time not be needed, i might be able to negotiate prices slightly for the time adjustment .. blah blah)

    4. Images - It's a great idea to pick a couple of best images from any particular session... regardless how much great images there are, clients AND photographers alike, tend to SCAN when looking at the models... and images in continuous sets with multiple (sometimes redundant) poses are simply not needed... Try to think of it as, you have only 3 images to make or sell a deal.... Agency Composites dont squeeeeze every image into a composite....

    Let a good photographer friend that knows his stuff tell you what sells and certainly what images cant be used..... this gotta be one of the most important things that i think few models here actually DO....

    5. If you're shooting TF work .... something i can suggest is to actually shoot every single piece of outfit you have, label them and lay them out into a web/ page that you can send to a potential photographer that u're keen to work with...

    yeah it's a big headache... but it really shows you TRY to make things work..... and nothing beats having a visual guideline of what a model's wardrobe consist of.... (if clients/photographer find something suitable... they might save some $$ on attire and make up for it by paying you more... (maybe)

    TO BE CONTINUED.......
    Last edited by ejunlow; 12th November 2008 at 05:28 PM.
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    UPZ!

    great thread!
    gracedotcom.blogspot.com - speak the language of grace :)

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    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    while informative

    unfortunately this has not nothing to do with the business of photography
    TS can consider posting this in a model forum

    after all models supply a service to photographers and not in the photography business
    TS can consider writing one for Photographers instead

    I will move this thread to the kopitiam

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    Senior Member phoakm's Avatar
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    This thread definitely a good reference for the models/talents who are considering to do freelances. I would get friends of interest to refer to this thread.

    A bit more suggestion to TS if possible to include copyrights knowledge. I felt that some of the models/talents are lack of such. Cheers!
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    Thanks for putting this up, I think it is important to know.
    Like you said most photographer are hobbyist ( I think I am one of them cause I am still nubcake and learning ).
    Another note you made is that most commercial photographer won't ever need to shoot an amateur model. I agree to a certain extend.
    Can you explain Test shots of model?
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    Nicely put ejun

    till today ive never charged any photographers, soo far ive been doing all TFCD's. hahaha to me $$$$$ is not important for the starting of my career as a model, important for me is ''EXPOSURE'' the more expose i get the better for me.

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    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Smile Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by ortega View Post
    while informative

    unfortunately this has not nothing to do with the business of photography
    TS can consider posting this in a model forum

    after all models supply a service to photographers and not in the photography business
    TS can consider writing one for Photographers instead

    I will move this thread to the kopitiam
    Thanks Ortega!
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    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    FOR MODELS & PHOTOGRAPHERS

    Thanks guys for actually reading the posts...On issues of copyright, I have my stands on them, however - not ever studying formal copyright laws... i don't actually think I'm the best person to discuss this... hmm here's some of my thoughts on what Freelancing Models should look out for though...

    [ MODEL RELEASES ]

    From whatever knowledge thus far, Model Releases are (usually) only necessary when the images are going to be published... As a note: Commercial Photographers seldom publish images - (publishers are the ones that buys the images / commision photographers and do the publishing (commercial or otherwise) hence most of the liability is usually on the end of the publisher.

    Shooting People on the Streets:

    In most cases (including Asia and the States), taking pictures of people (beautiful or not) on the public streets (without model releases certainly) and displaying these images for private non-commercial viewing is usually not an area that will involve anything legal....

    However, in the context here, we come to an interesting case of TEST SHOOTING models where by we are actually talking more about Privacy than Copyright. For models, there is seldom a need to worry as the Model Releases are more often than not (requested to be signed by the Photographer if he wants to use the images commercially).. Take Note however, that there is a fine difference between using the images for commercial SALE and using the images for their own portfolio sake. Should the images be used to promote the Photographer or their service in a form where by a release is needed (publishing a magazine for distribution or otherwise) it is often wise to have a formal model release signed. *For photographers that are actually printing your images for distribution or for showcasing - It's always a good idea to practice signing a formal release to make your model feel comfortable in what you're doing and if the shoot is a previously done shoot that you want to use the image... the simpliest way to avoid trouble is to ASK the MODEL FOR PERMISSION....* For models that frequently get their images published online by their respective photographers shooting them (As i understand it, they seldom practice signings of releases) and in a way, I feel it is safe to an extent but here is my guidelines to where to draw that line:

    1. Understand your images will be display in a public area.

    2. If you're shooting sensitive materials (nude/lingerie etc) It might be a good reason to request a model release to be sign or a simple Letter of Agreement (counter-signed) stating the images are only to be used for the photographers private display or showcase. (however little that might protect you in case of a mis-handling.. it's still a very good idea to do it)

    3. Find out about your photographer / Trust-worthiness / Reliability in terms of dealing with photographs and dealing with models.

    That all said - a note to PHOTOGRAPHERS is, taking images of anyone without their consent is considered highly impolite... and you never know if your subjects might find it offensive so it's always a good idea to ask for a simple permission...

    To be Continued....
    Last edited by ejunlow; 12th November 2008 at 05:28 PM.
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    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS: [ INVITING MODELS DOWN FOR A SHOOT ]

    (This section is for sharing with photographers)...

    Thanks for the responses through mail and msn... quite interestingly, it's photographers that are msging me rather than the models.... Some of you did ask what's usually required when you invite a model down to do tests and trials... Here's a few suggestions that I commonly practice...

    1. Conversation after Identification

    After you've identified a particular model which might suit one of your themes, it's always a good idea to converse with them to quickly sum up how well you two are communicating without visual contact... language barriers... Tone... Attitude can all be identified even if it's a casual conversation over msn...

    2. Request most RECENT image

    Propose the sending of recent images to make sure you get what you see... I've occassions when models with waist length hair in their portfolio decide to crop it short... and you really wouldnt want to be caught up with surprises during your shoot.

    3. Wardrobe Selection...

    This is just good logical sense.. Make certain to request for a picture of the attire if it's available. Further to add, it's always a good idea to bring multiple attire in case one doesnt work out as expected.... Also good to inform if you require them to bring make-up kits, personal hair brushes, heels and other accessories that they might want to tag along.

    4. What NOT to bring...

    If you don't like heavy make-up, dont feel comfortable shooting with colored contacts, strapped bras etc... It's always good to inform them in advance... and the day before the shoot.. Models are human.. and humans can forget.

    5. Be prepared....

    If you have a setup in the studio, make sure to check all your equipment and ensure your strobes have replacement bulbs, your scrims arent torn and your batteries are charged.. It's definately a good idea to have back-up plans and luck usually creep their way towards those that are more prepared than others.... If you're having a location shoot.. Prepare some common things including: First-Aid Kit, Repellent, Ponchos, Fresh Water and whatever small little items that might be beneficial... Do remember, Shooting in the sun might seem simple enough ... but the SUN is a very big hazard on its own.... Bring WATER.

    6. Conversation during actual shoot...

    Before starting any shooting at all (especially true if it's a new model). Ensure you run through your expectations, THEIR expectations of you, and what you both hope to achieve. Run through how much time is needed to give them an idea of organisation and during all this communication.... It is often good to share background about both parties and build up rapportship along the way....

    If the initial conversation and the face-to-face talk seems comfortable enough, you'll at leave feel confident to direct your model to do what's needed. If it is a test shoot, ensure you TEST what you came to test... including posing knowledge, anatomy, proportion, and ease of working.... Dont let your TEST shoot become a random Lets-Try-This-and-See session....

    If you are guiding a model however, then ensure you tell them what are your expectations, how to work with you, your usual working habits, lingo and what you want to achieve out of this Collaboration.

    7. During the actual "TEST" shoot itself...

    Know your stuff... Models are humans too.. and humans are sensitive to infamiliarity especially if they feel you ought to know your thing...

    Avoid talking too much if you arent the sort that can handle constant communication... A photographer that chats little and produce good results is a good photographer... and photographer that converse during the shoot to ease or lead the model is an experienced photographer.. if you have both.. that's a huge bonus...

    If working with the opposite sex (especially with someone new)... Avoid any commments that might be midunderstood... and it's a good idea to avoid PERSONAL comments altogether... things like... "You look so sexy Susan"... often isnt as professional as "having your hands by your shoulder would make you look more sexy"... simple rule, make sure all your comments stay technical and inclined towards producing a better image... Think "WRONG" and very often your model will know what's with your smirking grin...


    TO BE CONTINUED.....
    Last edited by ejunlow; 12th November 2008 at 05:29 PM.
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    Hi...

    Thank for the sharing.

    Great job!

  15. #15
    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    FOR CONSUMERS: [ WHY ARE THEY WORTH THAT MUCH???? ]

    *For people that wonder why we're worth that much...*

    I get random mails from clients to the general public asking us why our quotes differ so much from one individual to another... In summary, i'll attempt to explain this from a working photographer's standpoint..

    Personally, i'll broadly categorise Photographers into 3 diverse groups...

    1. THE PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER

    These are the people that make 100% of their main revenue from photography and its co-related activities... Including shooting for private commisions / fashion / editorials / advertorials / weddings / events / stills / products / travel and everything else in between.

    Why are they worth that much???

    Add these things up...

    Camera - Hassies or Pro range 35mm etc
    Workstations - multiple Imacs or G5s, MBP for location work etc
    Hardware - Lots of ext hard-drives for storing RAWs, Wacom tablets, Wireless Devices etc
    Software - CS4, Lightroom, Portrait Pro, Aperture etc
    Printers - Decent A3 to A2 printers for large format prints etc
    Studio - Top end lighting equipment - Enlinchrom, Bowens, Profotos, Stands, tripods, Reflectors, filters etc
    Outdoor Equipment - Scrims, Top-end Filters, Reflectors, a good tripod, Car, ERP etc
    Misc. things you cannot see - Servicing and maintenence of ALL OF THE ABOVE..

    From that minimal list up there, an investment at least $150,000... any Professional that bills anything less than 300-500/hr is suicidal.


    2. THE NON-PRO COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS

    This category uses photography activities as a supplement income. And wouldnt live a miserable life if they didnt have clients for a month... They differentiate from pros by investing in only what is required or more often than not - Renting Pro equipment when it's neccessary. More often than not, Commercial non-pros are usually in a similar industry - doing Advertising / Digital Imaging etc... and already have a good grasp of Photography knowledge... They are in fact, Professionals that probably find it more viable to earn from a more lucrative source of income (and probably much less stressful one) - Just for informative sake... i fall into this category..

    So why do Non-Pros bill as much as a Professional... Simply because of overheads... Not shooting full time doesnt mean you dont have a house/car/office/studio to upkeep... and for many of them, Photography might be a less viable means to earn a living because his BANKING job earns him more pay... So let's just give an example.... that if a lawyer bills $500/hr for his services... and someone engages him to do a photoshoot (provided he's competant) it's silly to bill anything less that what he's already worth...

    3. THE FREELANCE PHOTOGRAPHER

    I first like to differentiate my interpretation of freelance and part-time.

    By freelance i mean Photographer that shoots full time.. takes on commercial jobs, but instead of billing under their own names, they usually offer their services to multiple agencies or companies that need their services.

    By Part-time, i mean photographers that are usually hobbyist and want to start going into photography as a career... These are usually students/ people with jobs that are SICK of it... and within the public photography forums.... most of them fall into this category..

    Photographers under this category can charge anything as low as (i've heard) $200 for a full-days work... and why are they THAT cheap? it's simply because they CAN... most of the time, these are the ones that don't always invest in the top-end gear, don't have the overheads that professionals do (home/car/investments/studio/gear) and have a common mentality of ($200 dollars a day = that new Zara top i just saw... )

    [ ARE THEY SPOILING THE MARKET THEN? ]

    To me.... I hardly think so.... Good clients know the difference between a professional and a part-time photographer... Often, it's not only about the standard of images, but also the way the make the whole project work, the professionalism in dealing with clients, THE SECURITY that they can make it right... So the next time you hear about people billing $1000/hr doing weddings, and you think the one shooting $50/hr is spoiling the market... Think again... more often than not, the one shooting at $1000/hr have his own segment of the market and the one shooting $50/hr is probably trying to reach that level of $1000/hr one day...

    IT'S AN OPEN MARKET OUT THERE... YOU ARE WHAT YOU THINK YOU'RE WORTH...

    ... a talented friend once asked.... "do you know why they can charge so high?"

    ... "because they can....."

    Last edited by ejunlow; 12th November 2008 at 06:21 PM.
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    thanks! Very informative and engaging read!

  17. #17
    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by thomas3k View Post
    thanks! Very informative and engaging read!
    Not at all.... it's probably useful to a handful of people in the forums that might be keen on building up their portfolio... but i hope it helps.... *information is pretty subjective though* at least til this point, i havent recieved any hate mails yet....

    cheers guys...
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    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS: [ I want to make this my CAREER! HOW?!?!? ]

    I have to be honest, it's not simple making a living out of photography.... and for those trying to bridge the gap to becoming a "complete" photographer... here's my few cents worth....

    Photography (the Skill & the Art)

    It's paramount you know what you are doing if you decide to even make a career out of it... and being a professional almost always require you to be a COMPLETE all-rounder when it comes to photography - this includes the following know-hows..

    - Know the history of photography (how it began, the working styles of the greats... old and new upcoming photographers)
    - Master theory of composition (know how portrait and fashion posing works)
    - Master and understand the SCIENCE of lighting (you DONT test with clients)
    - Understand fully all your equipment (in and out of the studio)
    - Know what's available in the market for effects use (lensbabies, expodiscs, various filters)
    - Know the current trends in your market segment.

    For the few that graduated with a visual arts, film or cinematography background (myself included) this part of the learning is probably the beginning of it all... and when you go commercial, there's things you NEVER learn in school that you need to pick up...these include:

    - Marketing yourself

    web presence, identity your potential market, branding your style with yourself, networking with the appropriate people

    - Communication skills

    if you want someone to pick up your services and pay you more than he pays your competitor.. you need to know why you're worth that much more.. and not only that.. you need to explain it to your client

    - Digital Imaging

    if you come from a VC background or a digital arts background... this is part of your advantage... however, I know a lot of photographers that continue to use simple filters for results... if you want to go commercial... Definately master the industrial tools.. Photoshop is paramount ... and that doesnt mean just using preset filters. A good photoshop artist knows how to get the results the CLIENT wants.. and knowing how to do selective blending modes, working with complex layers, area masking, convertions to various profiles, understanding cmyk, lab colors and with the latest advantages of CS4, it might even be helpful if you know how to model and import models from maya and 3DS.

    Sure, you can pay a top-end digital artist for the job.. and this is what most professionals do in-fact, but when you're new and you cant afford to pay that $5000 for a well d.i'ed image... then you really need to know how to do it yourself... i consider this a fundamental knowledge... crucial to ANY commercial photographer.

    - Fashion/Portrait Posing...

    This area can be picked up through lots of online/off-line sources and again ( for those that come from an art school... drawing and shooting nudes every week) you'll find this a breeze.. for the majority that did business or engineering in school.... here's where you make the most of your TFCD shoots... but not without guidelines..... Know how anatomy works, know what makes your models look BETTER... and know what the drawbacks of using different lens types in different situations.... You wont ever use a fish-eye to shoot a lingerie model for vogue for example... unless it's your newly created style of photography that you think will storm the world over....

    Now for the expensive part....

    It is Ridiculously Expensive to start with nothing and you want to be a pro photographer... simple reasons.. it's very expensive to start with.. and if you don't have a main "holding" job... it's gonna be awfully tough in your first few months of work.

    Consider the following: (previously mentioned but in detail here)

    Camera, Spare Camera, Pro Lenses, Filters, Multiple Flashcards, Multiple Stands, Multiple Strobe heads, Job-specific accessories like Barns, booms, snoots, grids, reflectors, scrims, Light meters, Calibrators, Gray cards, Printer profilers, Hardware profilers, Notebooks(for location work), cords, wireless transmitters, Batteries, Power packs, Backdrops, Backdrop poles, viewers, backup kits, camera trunks, cases, software (photoshop licenses etc), hardware (imac/g5 whatever), tablets, cables, work stations, rental, studio facilities (and it's utility costs), transport/car (and it's utility costs) and if you still dont get the idea... this list is just the beginning.....


    In conclusion to what i've just written.... Unless you get a loan, rob/steal/kidnap/beg... it's highly unlikely to decide to make Photographer your career just by having a 1Ds mk3 and a few L lenses... honestly, the camera probably makes up 10% of yourinitial capital investment cost..(and oh... these things DEPRECIATE!) and unless you got a good idea how to get back your return on investment (ROI).. it's definately a tough call to decide "YEAH.. i will be the next geoff ang / russel wong"

    NEXT: How to overcome all the odds and get the clients you need if you still decide to eat campbell soup for the first year of your working life.....
    Last edited by ejunlow; 13th November 2008 at 01:13 AM.
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  19. #19
    Senior Member ejunlow's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    Sorry for those that emailed me on some questions.... I'm usually pretty occupied once i hit the studio and it'll be much much better if you could just add me to msn... i'll try to converse there... (usually in the evening when the day comes to an end though...) and oh, you can add me to msn or send a msg there with that cool "cute little fella" icon under the number of posts i've posted......

    Ejun
    Last edited by ejunlow; 13th November 2008 at 01:37 AM.
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  20. #20
    Member/Tangshooter g-khoo's Avatar
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    Default Re: How much should Freelance Models charge... my practical suggestions

    That's alot of useful information provided there Ejun.



    "IT'S AN OPEN MARKET OUT THERE... YOU ARE WHAT YOU THINK YOU'RE WORTH..."

    Indeed

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