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Thread: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

  1. #1

    Default Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Hi all,

    After reading my camera manual... im still quite lost with some scene modes.

    Just some quick questions...


    1) Is it better to use "scenery mode" or "sunset mode" to capture utumn leaves? Since it's reddish...

    2) Is it recommended to use "Night scenery" or "High Sensitivity" for night view...

    3) Settings for night scenery (low ISO + slow shutter speed + high F + no flash??) Erm..will not be using tripod

    4) how to minimise reflection of the window while taking the sky in airplane? (place the lens attaching the window? ...


    I just can't really differentiate between these modes

    Hope to take some nice Autumn pics during the trip

    Thanks in Advance!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    I'm confused with (3). For night shoot, shouldn't the ISO be higher and aperture open wider?
    As for the flash, I guess it has to do with the distance of your subject.

    Tripod is highly recommended for people with unsteady hands like me

  3. #3

    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Quote Originally Posted by subxero View Post
    I'm confused with (3). For night shoot, shouldn't the ISO be higher and aperture open wider?
    As for the flash, I guess it has to do with the distance of your subject.

    Tripod is highly recommended for people with unsteady hands like me
    Heh..not sure woh...im a newbie...just read abit here & there. I could be wrong just correct my understanding pls

    As for tripod..err..troublesome to bring for travelling..i'll just rest my camera on on anything ba heh...

  4. #4
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Start here and get the basics right. You need to know what the 3 main parameters (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) mean, how do you set them and what are the effects and side effects. Without this it's all guessing without basis. If the time is too short to learn then stay with the 'Program' Mode.
    Scenery modes are presets for certain conditions. They can be a starting point for you to learn but you need to understand what the camera does. So check how the settings change once you activate such a mode.
    1) The key here is white balance (also called grey balance this it's about 18% grey). Learn about this topic and how to adjust your camera.
    2 and 3) The settings for 'Night scenery' demand for a tripod. The settings are correct to capture a whole scenery (landscape) - therefore the high f-stop. Low ISO will prevent image noise. Both together with result in long exposure time. Nothing that you can hand-hold.
    4) Yep, get close to the window. But .. remembering the average airplane window you won't get much. Windows are seldom clear, mostly scratched or fogged.

    Tripod is the best Image Stabilizer you can get. One-time expense but fits all lenses and cameras
    Last edited by Octarine; 28th October 2008 at 04:14 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Start here and get the basics right. You need to know what the 3 main parameters (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) mean, how do you set them and what are the effects and side effects. Without this it's all guessing without basis. If the time is too short to learn then stay with the 'Program' Mode.
    Scenery modes are presets for certain conditions. They can be a starting point for you to learn but you need to understand what the camera does. So check how the settings change once you activate such a mode.
    1) The key here is white balance (also called grey balance this it's about 18% grey). Learn about this topic and how to adjust your camera.
    2 and 3) The settings for 'Night scenery' demand for a tripod. The settings are correct to capture a whole scenery (landscape) - therefore the high f-stop. Low ISO will prevent image noise. Both together with result in long exposure time. Nothing that you can hand-hold.
    4) Yep, get close to the window. But .. remembering the average airplane window you won't get much. Windows are seldom clear, mostly scratched or fogged.

    Tripod is the best Image Stabilizer you can get. One-time expense but fits all lenses and cameras
    Thanks Shifu

    I actually had the link bookmarked. Read and read over & over and will be reading it over & over again more often! keke... i think the 18% white balance is hard. as for F stops...i normally link it to depth of field more...

    Thanks for the tips

  6. #6
    Member kenkht's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Ya, do what Octarine advised. I too started out confused and went for the full auto mode. But then again, why buy a DSLR and use auto mode?? Much cheaper point'n'shoot cameras can do that. Heck, you mobile phone can do that!

    My advise is to read and understand the relationship between ISO, Aperture and Shutter speed. There's plenty of resources can be found on the web. That's how I learn. And then there's White Balance, metering etc.. Play around.. a lot..and have fun. You'll get it..

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Quote Originally Posted by Bathtub81 View Post
    Hi all,

    After reading my camera manual... im still quite lost with some scene modes.

    Just some quick questions...


    1) Is it better to use "scenery mode" or "sunset mode" to capture utumn leaves? Since it's reddish...
    <if you know little of exposure, better choose scenert mode. better if you spend a hour or so to read on aperture setting and practice. then you can stick to Av mode>

    2) Is it recommended to use "Night scenery" or "High Sensitivity" for night view...
    3) Settings for night scenery (low ISO + slow shutter speed + high F + no flash??) Erm..will not be using tripod
    <tripod. if hand held, IS+ISO 800 (doubt any can go 1600 without obvious noise) + max aperture+any support to your body or arm>

    4) how to minimise reflection of the window while taking the sky in airplane? (place the lens attaching the window? ...
    <cpl>

    I just can't really differentiate between these modes

    Hope to take some nice Autumn pics during the trip
    <if sunny, compensate+1, if rainy, compensate-1, if dunno, take a few with different mode.>
    Thanks in Advance!
    <practise will help you capture a great trip>

  8. #8
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Quote Originally Posted by Bathtub81 View Post
    ... i think the 18% white balance is hard. as for F stops...i normally link it to depth of field more...
    Thanks for the tips
    You can use white balance tools like ExpoDisk and the various DIY versions. Here is a good description (and pictures) how it works. But beware, the real Expodisk is not cheap. It goes 2nd hand about 150 bucks, sometimes even lower.
    Here is one thread in newbies corner about the topic. Lot's of information about How-To and equipment. Other tools:
    - Pringles caps, Foam cups
    - http://www.lallyphotography.com/store/
    - Filter with paper tissue ...
    Basics to read up: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...te-balance.htm

    Regarding f-stop: It's not only for DOF. It's one of the two 'regulators' for light (shutter being the other one). Both work together to achieve correct exposure. If you need longer shutter speed you'll need to close the aperture (higher f-stop numbers) for correct exposure (let's leave aside the topic of ND filters).

  9. #9

    Default Re: Scene Mode Question...Beginner here

    Honestly, if you can't differentiate between these modes, then it makes no difference whether you set it to scene modes, leave it at P, or tweak the settings yourself!

    I'd suggest you use a tripod, take the same picture using different settings, you'll notice the subtle differences. Taking autumn pictures depends on individual tastes, some like it vivid, like blazing gold; but some prefer it to be more toned down, to achieve a dreamy state.

    Try different settings, and choose what pleases you most. There are 1,001 ways to take a picture, but the one that suits you most is the most important. Settings are not cast in stone. Happy shooting!
    from guitars, cars to dslr...

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