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Thread: PFT and TFCD guides for newbies

  1. #1
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    Default PFT and TFCD guides for newbies

    Came across an article while I was discussing with a talent agency. I realised that most freelance models here and photographers like to abuse the corporation or get taken advantage of due to the lack of experience.. so here's a guideline I found which is pretty common with most reputable agency I had a chance to work with, and should serve as a basis for negotiation and understanding.

    I did a (non in-depth) search and found no such article so I'm posting it.. if it's been posted, mods do feel free to delete it.. =)
    Last edited by viix; 22nd October 2008 at 02:23 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: PFT and TFCD guides for newbies

    What is PFT (prints for time)?
    from the Models Guide

    Sometimes also called time for prints (PFT, or TFP), it is a co-operation for mutual benefit: The model puts in her/his time, resources and effort, and the photographer does the same. No money changes hands. Both, the model and the photographer cover their own expenses and benefit from each other's skills and talents. (grey area, so YMMV)

    As the name suggests, the model's fee consists of photographic prints. If the model receives digital images instead of prints, it is called TFCD, or time for CD.

    Other terms you may come across are test, testing, test shoot - but this is not really the same, so check the details before agreeing to anything.

    Prints for time also means that nobody has commissioned the photographer to take the photographs. The photographer does what is termed personal work.

    Prints for time is meant to be a low budget affair. More often than not, the model will be required to do her (his) own hair and make-up, and supply her (his) own clothes.

    Approach a prints for time shoot with professionalism. It is not just a laugh. Treat it as work, not a bit of fun. Of course, you are allowed to have fun at work ...

    Remember that you are a partner in the project. There has to be a fair balance of responsibilities. Don't expect the photographer to do all the work and do not expect the photographer to treat the shoot simply as a free portfolio shoot for you.

    You, the model, do not only have the right to prints, but also the responsibility to put all your efforts, imagination, creativity and heart in it. The photographer, too, must get something out of a prints for time shoot.
    Last edited by viix; 22nd October 2008 at 02:27 PM.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: PFT and TFCD guides for newbies

    What is TFCD (time for CD)?
    from the Models Guide


    Basically the same as PFT, but the model receives digital images instead of prints. Increasingly popular for obvious reasons.

    Aspiring models often believe that it is really attractive to receive a large number of images immediately after the shoot. Think again! Only the very inexperienced or the extremely nave assume that it is a seductive proposal by default. In a portfolio, you want quality, not quantity.

    There are some pitfalls that you want to watch out for:
    It is not in your interest to receive a copy of every photograph taken. The photographer should take the time to edit the photos and only give you a selection of the best. You do not have the expertise to select the right images from a large collection.

    Digital or print, a good photograph requires work after it has been taken - and I don't mean digital trickery on a mediocre picture. If you are presented with a CD immediately after the shoot, the photographer has not had the time to do any post-production work on the images (or could not be bothered or did not know how to).

    No self-respecting photographer wants to release photos that are anything but perfect. From a large number of photographs taken during a shoot, only a few will meet the demanding criteria a photographer should impose on himself (or herself). Many photos from a shoot are just not good enough for a variety of reasons - technically, compositionally, pose-wise.

    I know of people who think that just because a photograph is in focus and correctly exposed, it is a good photograph. Bless 'em.

    If you are offered a copy of everything, you are working with a photographer who does not take (or does not know how to take) pride in his or her work. Not a good idea!

  4. #4

    Default Re: PFT and TFCD guides for newbies

    good article! should have posted it in the services offered or services wanted forums though. v good advice for both photographers and models alike.

    thanks!!

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