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Thread: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

  1. #1

    Default What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Things to bring for trekking is quite amount of personal items, say, Mt Kinabalu for 2 days. So I'm want to bring along DSLR with it.

    Personally, I will take one Standard Zoom lens, light body (400D), no grip, no flash, a number of CF Cards, how to avoid and protect harsh condition such as soil, knocks, rain and amount of batteries?

    Anyone can advise?
    Last edited by sanfong; 22nd October 2008 at 04:04 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Since you are not changing lens, I suggest you use a sufficiently big ziplock bag to splash-soil-proof your DSLR. It's quite simple. Put the DSLR body first into the ziplock bag with the lens facing outwards to opening. Use a rubber band to tie up the opening to the front of the lens. Use scissors to cut away the excess infront of the lens. There you have it! Ziplock bag is transparent so you can see the LCD screen and info panel easily. If you have lens hood, it will help protect the front of the lens. Make sure you also have a protective filter on your lens. (*edit: pls see below)

    You will need spare batteries to last the 2 cold days. Cold weather drains the battery faster. If you shoot jpeg, then a 2GB CF card should be sufficient. You should know your shooting style. Of course, the more mem space you have, the better.

    You should have a watertight-airtight hard case to store your camera and lens. An affordable choice is those lock n lock boxes at NTUC. There are many sizes to choose from. You need these when you go sleep at night and need to keep your equipment safe from rain or need protection in your soft backpack when you are not using your DSLR. The method of using ziplock bag I suggested earlier should be sufficient to splash-proof your DSLR (e.g. drizzle,) but it is not enough to water proof it.

    Just my 5cts contribution.

    * I only do this splashproofing if I think it is going to rain. If not, I always exposed the camera to the elements. Furthermore, it can be quite difficult to look through the viewfinder with the ziplock bag on at all times. Sometimes it takes a bit of guts to trust your equipment.
    Last edited by Genie In A Lightbox; 23rd October 2008 at 04:29 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Tks Genie! But a couple of quetions, wouldn't it be very bulky to carry Lock & Lock box? Is it enough to store the camera in a waterproof bag then covered with poncho or ground sheet, etc... and then again, will the climate there will be very wet, I presume, will the moisture cause damage to the camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Genie In A Lightbox View Post
    Since you are not changing lens, I suggest you use a sufficiently big ziplock bag to splash-soil-proof your DSLR. It's quite simple. Put the DSLR body first into the ziplock bag with the lens facing outwards to opening. Use a rubber bag to tie up the opening to the front of the lens. Use scissors to cut away the excess infront of the lens. There you have it! Ziplock bag is transparent so you can see the lcd and info panel easily. If you have lens hood, it will help protect the front of the lens. Make sure you also have a protective filter on your lens.

    You will need spare batteries to last the 2 cold days. Cold weather drains the battery faster. If you shoot jpeg, then a 2GB CF card should be sufficient. You should know your shooting style. Of course, the more mem space you have, the better.

    You should have a watertight-airtight hard case to store your camera and lens. An affordable choice is those lock n lock boxes at NTUC. There are many sizes to choose from. You need these when you go sleep at night and need to keep your equipment safe from rain or need protection in your soft backpack when you are not using your DSLR. The ziplock bag should be sufficient to splash proof your DSLR but it is not enough to water proof it.

    Just my 5cts contribution.

  4. #4

    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Quote Originally Posted by sanfong View Post
    Tks Genie! But a couple of quetions, wouldn't it be very bulky to carry Lock & Lock box? Is it enough to store the camera in a waterproof bag then covered with poncho or ground sheet, etc... and then again, will the climate there will be very wet, I presume, will the moisture cause damage to the camera?
    The lock n lock box is up to individual preference - it is not a must. The only advantage you have is it provides airtight and rigid storage space for your camera and lens when needed. If you shoot on the go most of the time, the box is redundant. Personally I pack my camera body and one lens (inside lens pouch) into one box. This storage method saved my D70 when my entire backpack dropped into a river once (not during trek up Mt K). Ziplock bag with no tears and if sealed properly will waterproof your equipment but compared to lock n lock box, I prefer the latter.

    If you bring your camera for trek, you should not worry about moisture seeping into your equipment - that 2 days of trekking will not harm your equipment so don't worry so much. Your worry is only whether rain will hamper your shooting. If it rains, then the splash-proofing method I suggested will work fine if you want to shoot in the rain. But you should keep a cloth accessible to wipe off water droplets from the front of your lens.

    From my experience, don't hang the camera on the back your neck and let it swing freely infront of you because it is more prone to knocks. I prefer to cross sling it to one side i.e. I sling the strap over my head onto my left shoulder and the camera hangs above my right waist. It just doesn't swing around and my right arm shields it nicely. I'm a right-hander. When I want to shoot, I can easily raise the camera with right hand. You may need to adjust your strap length loose enough to allow you to raise your camera to shoot easily while not too loose until it swings freely by your waist. I use optech usa camera strap fyi so the anti-slip pad works great and it makes camera feel lighter. In addition, I adjust until when I raise the camera to my eye, there is tension in the strap to pull the camera to my forehead to prevent camera shake (you could be huffing and puffing during trekking).

    Make sure you have enough battery juice for the hike up and down. Also be mentally prepared, I have seen people enthusiastically shooting on the way up but kept their camera on their way down just because they are too tired.

  5. #5
    Member kenkht's Avatar
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    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Genie In A Lightbox's comment is almost what I had in mind except the Lock n Lock box. Instead, use a good size plastic bag and tie it up tight. That should take care of most water problem. Ever float it on river once (emergency only la)
    Last edited by kenkht; 23rd October 2008 at 04:23 PM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Quote Originally Posted by kenkht View Post
    Genie In A Lightbox's comment is almost what I had in mind except the Lock n Lock box. Instead, use a good size plastic bag and tie it up tight. That should take care of most water problem. Ever float it on river once (emergency only la)
    Actually I assumed TS is asking how to splashproof his gear if he needs to shoot in the rain so i suggested the ziplock bag method. This method will not let his gear float on water though. I hope he does not get the wrong idea.

  7. #7

    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Asolutely no misunderstanding here, so ur way of slinging will prevent abrasions and knockings. Will take note of that. Probably will not iron teeth and will get the Lk&LK box to prevent mishap. hahaha... so i guess i can't the guys for rafting then?

  8. #8

    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Quote Originally Posted by sanfong View Post
    Asolutely no misunderstanding here, so ur way of slinging will prevent abrasions and knockings. Will take note of that. Probably will not iron teeth and will get the Lk&LK box to prevent mishap. hahaha... so i guess i can't the guys for rafting then?
    For rafting, there is a risk involved. You've got to make the call yourself whether you want to shoot during rafting or shoot your friends rafting. Calm or rapids? For me, a simple assessment is benefit/risk ratio. If benefit outweighs the risk, by all means go for it. For rafting rapids, the ride can be so wild and wet that 90% of your pics might be blurred but there are potentially 10% jaw-dropping shots you might get. In rapids, water will be splashing all over your raft, your camera gear can get wet or can drop into the river very easily. For calm rivers, my camera is out all the time. If you do not want to shoot when on water, it is best you have watertight containers for your expensive gear, just in case. My 5cts contribution.

  9. #9
    Member kenkht's Avatar
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    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Of course you can go rafting. Just get a watertight cover for you cam that divers use. Depends on which cam model the cover comes in..

  10. #10

    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    Quote Originally Posted by kenkht View Post
    Of course you can go rafting. Just get a watertight cover for you cam that divers use. Depends on which cam model the cover comes in..
    Oh! Why didn't I think of that?!

  11. #11
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    Default Re: What to prepare for M'sia Trekking?

    you can...but you wont like the price. you would probably enjoy rafting more without your camera. no time to take picture when you're in the rapids!
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