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Thread: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

  1. #101

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    I dropped by Razorsharp yesterday and saw this beauty 'on reserve' for some lucky person.


    [photo: photobum]


    [photo: japanesechefsknife.com]

    This is a Hattori KD 210mm Gyuto.

    According to the literature, Mr. Hattori has devoted all his energies, times, experiences and t
    echniques to create this beautiful gyuto, using ancient forging technique of the swordmaking. Each blade is hand forged from Cowry X core steel with Nickel Stainless Damascus steel. Cowry X is the tough powdered metal alloy specially developed by Daido Steel Company for high performance cutting tools. It contains high carbon (3%) and high Chromium (20%) with 1% Molybdenum and 0.3% Vanadium, and can be heat treated to HRC63 to 67 without brittleness. Sturdy black linen Micarta handle enhanced with nickel silver bolster and rivets, fits perfectly with your hand, and is water and shrinkage proof.

    This knife costs S$2,900 before GST.


    Another eye candy.

    [photo: photobum]

    This is a combination hardwood end grain chopping block. Individually handcrafted, hand-polished and oiled. Costs S$179 each.
    Last edited by photobum; 2nd January 2009 at 07:07 AM.

  2. #102
    Member lennyl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    That cutting board - would be a true shame to use it as a cutting board. It's more appropriate framed up and hung on the wall.

    The Hattori.. *sigh* beautiful.

  3. #103

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    The Hattori.. *sigh* beautiful.
    Agree. I would love to own one.

  4. #104

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Now we are talking!

    Great to know that there are a few culinary masters on ClubSnap.

    Sadly, I am just an amateur when it comes to the food industry.
    Wait wait........you are a knife expert but a culinary amatuer..........nonsense lar!

    You should give it a try in the kitchen.....maybe ask Oasis bro to lend a helping hand....

    That's a beautiful Hattori.......$2900 without GST is their mark up price lar. They have to make a profit of course but I am guessing it should be in the region of $2000-$2200.

    Sometimes when I see a cutting board so smooth and beautiful, it just breaks my heart to use them.

  5. #105

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    Wait wait........you are a knife expert but a culinary amatuer..........nonsense lar!

    You should give it a try in the kitchen.....maybe ask Oasis bro to lend a helping hand....

    Sometimes when I see a cutting board so smooth and beautiful, it just breaks my heart to use them.
    The problem I am encountering now is my work schedule. I could only cook at home during weekends. I wish I have more time on hand to experiment with various cuisines.

    Yes, that chopping block is pity to use. I guess it is more for decorative purposes, or for serving food to guests.
    Last edited by photobum; 27th September 2008 at 10:52 AM.

  6. #106
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    bro photobum, any chance of showing us how to sharpen our knives with your beautiful drawings
    see my portfolio, for your comments.

  7. #107
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    what are those patterns called?

  8. #108

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jix View Post
    what are those patterns called?
    These patterns are called Damascus.

    According to Wikipedia.com, "Damascus" refers to metal with a visible grain pattern, sometimes with a texture. Modern Damascus is a lamination of folded steels selected with cosmetic qualities, with grinding and polishing specifically to expose the layers. True Damascus patterns are formed when carbon trace elements form visible swirls in the steel mix. These elements change properties when the steel is work hardened (forged), creating the patterns.

    The original Damascus steel swords may have been made in the vicinity of Damascus, Syria, in the period from 900AD to as late as 1750AD. Damascus steel is a type of steel alloy that is both hard and flexible, a combination that made it ideal for the building of swords. It is said that when Damascus-made swords were first encountered by Europeans during the Crusades.

    When forming a batch of steel, impurities are added to control the properties of the resulting alloy. In general, notably during the era of Damascus steel, one could produce an alloy that was hard and brittle at one extreme by adding up to 2% carbon, or soft and malleable at the other, with about 0.5% carbon. The problem for a swordsmith is that the best steel should be both hard and malleable — hard, so as to hold an edge once sharpened, but malleable so it would not break when hitting other metal in combat. This was not possible with normal processes.
    Last edited by photobum; 27th September 2008 at 12:53 PM.

  9. #109

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Xing View Post
    bro photobum, any chance of showing us how to sharpen our knives with your beautiful drawings
    I am too lazy to do so many sketches at once, and I suck at drawing hands. Can I do a 'live' demonstration to you instead? Don't worry, it is FOC. Just give me 1 to 2 hours of your time.

    Do PM me if you are keen.

  10. #110

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Kitchen Samurai Theory 101 - Why not a cheap knife since it does the same tasks as an expensive one?

    As with many tool, cheap knives are not cost-effective and it is always worth investing on a good set of knives that you can afford (it is like why buy a 'L' or 'D' lens when any cheap lenses will do). Quality knives are either German, British (Sheffield), Swiss or Japanese. These countries have been leaders in the manufacture of precision instruments, having access to steel foundries, and a history of uncompromising quality standards.

    If you cook every day, you have to use a knife frequently. A good-quality knife (usually costs more) will enhance your experience of cooking by making the preparation of the ingredients much easier and a real pleasure. A good set of knives can last for life.

    These days, you can buy a set of good-quality knives for less than the price of an 8-course dinner at a fancy restaurant.
    Last edited by photobum; 27th September 2008 at 11:24 PM.

  11. #111
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Just saw a line of knives, Kai in Isetan...looks pretty nice too
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  12. #112

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    zzzzzzzz 6 pages of thread and not a single photo of knife collection...

    OK, my wife is cooking everyday.
    I want to give her one or two knives (but not so expensive hor).
    She would need to cut veggie and meat the most (btw, by saying veggie, I mean include carrot and potato. Are they considered veggie in knife world?)

    So please kindly give me advice what to buy, where to buy and how much?

    I choose not to PM since other people might find it useful. THanks!

  13. #113
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    These patterns are called Damascus.

    According to Wikipedia.com, "Damascus" refers to metal with a visible grain pattern, sometimes with a texture. Modern Damascus is a lamination of folded steels selected with cosmetic qualities, with grinding and polishing specifically to expose the layers. True Damascus patterns are formed when carbon trace elements form visible swirls in the steel mix. These elements change properties when the steel is work hardened (forged), creating the patterns.

    The original Damascus steel swords may have been made in the vicinity of Damascus, Syria, in the period from 900AD to as late as 1750AD. Damascus steel is a type of steel alloy that is both hard and flexible, a combination that made it ideal for the building of swords. It is said that when Damascus-made swords were first encountered by Europeans during the Crusades.

    When forming a batch of steel, impurities are added to control the properties of the resulting alloy. In general, notably during the era of Damascus steel, one could produce an alloy that was hard and brittle at one extreme by adding up to 2% carbon, or soft and malleable at the other, with about 0.5% carbon. The problem for a swordsmith is that the best steel should be both hard and malleable hard, so as to hold an edge once sharpened, but malleable so it would not break when hitting other metal in combat. This was not possible with normal processes.
    Wow! Thanks for the lesson.

    Now I know why it's so expensive. But considering the skills and craftsmanship required to make these masterpieces, I think it's worth the money.

  14. #114

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by amateur_photographer View Post
    zzzzzzzz 6 pages of thread and not a single photo of knife collection...

    OK, my wife is cooking everyday.
    I want to give her one or two knives (but not so expensive hor).
    She would need to cut veggie and meat the most (btw, by saying veggie, I mean include carrot and potato. Are they considered veggie in knife world?)

    So please kindly give me advice what to buy, where to buy and how much?

    I choose not to PM since other people might find it useful. THanks!
    I really think it depends on each individual. Since your wifey cooks, you will have to ask her to go with you. Handling and comfort is quite important.

    Pricing depends on the brand......from as little as $60 for a piece of knife from Wusthof to as much as $400 for the same brand.

    Brands again depends on where it is made......some lower range of branded knives like Wusthof, Henkels and WMF are made in China (which sorry to say I think the quality made from China is absolutely RUBBISH!).

    Care of quality knives is just as important. Does not mean when you buy a $500 knife means it will be sharp forever. You will need to polish it and the right way.

    I think photobum will give you a few more tips. I am no knife expert but I know what I need when I am cooking.

    The most important is at the end of the day, your wife will use less strangth and energy in cutting and slicing vege and meats if you buy the right knives.

    Stay tuned for photobum.......................A Samurai Warrior and also.....A Professional Knife Collector!

  15. #115

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    After reading this thread n following Photobum's good advice, I bought a Global Deba. Reasonably prices (under 150). I use it for fish, meat and cutting veg. For me being a total newbie, it just fits nicely and very sharp and of course not too costly.
    Thx again Photobum and all the contributors here.
    Cheers
    Last edited by FireHouse; 28th September 2008 at 02:33 PM.

  16. #116

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by FireHouse View Post
    After reading this thread n following Photobum's good advice, I bought a Global Deba. Reasonably prices (under 150). I use it for fish, meat and cutting veg. For me being a total newbie, it just fits nicely and very sharp and of course not to costly.
    Thx again Photobum and all the contributors here.
    Cheers
    Is it the 7inch one?

  17. #117

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    Is it the 7inch one?
    yes, its the 7". They have a new Santoku set that comes with a small Chef's knife with "scallop" edges going for under 300. I was keen but I needed the Deba bcoz we eat more fish at home.

    Cheers

  18. #118

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by FireHouse View Post
    yes, its the 7". They have a new Santoku set that comes with a small Chef's knife with "scallop" edges going for under 300. I was keen but I needed the Deba bcoz we eat more fish at home.

    Cheers
    Cool! I actually have a friend who is a chef use this knife too......and mainly for fish!

    Yes it's quite sharp but if you have a ceramic whetstone will be perfect to take care of your precious knife.

    Enjoy your new purchase......

  19. #119

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by amateur_photographer View Post
    zzzzzzzz 6 pages of thread and not a single photo of knife collection...

    OK, my wife is cooking everyday.
    I want to give her one or two knives (but not so expensive hor).
    She would need to cut veggie and meat the most (btw, by saying veggie, I mean include carrot and potato. Are they considered veggie in knife world?)

    So please kindly give me advice what to buy, where to buy and how much?

    I choose not to PM since other people might find it useful. THanks!
    Haha... You want to view my knife collection. Nothing pretty though as all of them are used (none of them looks anything like the Hattori KD posted above). Anyway, I never intended to show off my collection but I guess some people are curious to know how a dozen knives of various lengths stacked side-by-side will look. The very sole purpose I started this thread is not to display my kitchen knife collection but to inform and to create awareness about knife handling, usages, safety and care (which surprisingly, many people overlook and take for granted).

    By the way, a Japanese 180mm santoku (the three-virtues) knife will be perfect for your wife. It is not too big or chunky in a lady's hand. Most importantly, most women I know dislike handling heavy knives. Therefore, a santoku knife is ideal (it is extremely popular among Japanese housewives). Other knives she will need are a 80mm paring knife and a 120mm utility knife.

    I suggest both you and your wife pay Razorsharp a visit. Let her try the knives (after all she is the one who use it). For a good quality and yet reasonably-priced knife, I recommend the Kasumi 180mm Santoku Japanese chef knife.

    [photo: razorsharp.com]

    It is retailed for S$180 but I believe Tina can give you a very good discount.

    (Disclaimer: I don't work for Razorsharp, nor am I earning commission from my referrals. In my opinion, they are one of the very few stores in Singapore which does not hire ignorant sales persons. Their staffs actually use the knives and products themselves, thus give valuable feedbacks and honest recommendations.)

    According to Kasumi product literature, their knives are produced by Sumikama Cutlery in Seki, Japan. Sumikama Cutlery specializes in producing knives from the most advanced materials with the most advanced manufacturing techniques. Producing these two ranges of knives requires tremendous experience and knowledge in order to be able to achieve the full benefit from these materials.

    Kasumi knives are made from 33 layers of stainless steel. Only the middle layer acts as the cutting edge, and it is made using V-Gold No. 10 stainless steel. V-Gold No. 10 is a high carbon stainless steel with cobalt, manganese, molybdenum and vanadium for added durability and ease of sharpening. V-Gold No. 10 is a high quality steel developed exclusively for knives and scissors. The addition of cobalt to this steel requires special tempering in order to maximize the full benefit of this steel. Sumikama's technique for this special tempering is a closely guarded secret.

    The layers on both sides of the V-Gold No. 10 core are made by repeatedly folding together two different types of stainless steel and forge welding them by hand until you have sixteen exceedingly thin alternating layers. These sixteen layers are then forge welded to both sides of the V-Gold No. 10 core.

    The edge on a Kasumi knife is beveled like a western style knife. However, the bevel is much larger than the bevel on a European or American brand. This larger bevel creates a sharper edge. Kasumi knives do not have a bolster. They do have a stainless steel ferrule that is forge welded to the blade to ensure that food particles do not become trapped between the blade and the handle. They also have a full tang. The handle is made from multiple layers of wood impregnated with a plastic resin. The handle is riveted to the tang.
    Last edited by photobum; 2nd January 2009 at 07:04 AM.

  20. #120

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    I really think it depends on each individual. Since your wifey cooks, you will have to ask her to go with you. Handling and comfort is quite important..... The most important is at the end of the day, your wife will use less strangth and energy in cutting and slicing vege and meats if you buy the right knives.
    I recommended him to get his wife a Japanese santoku (three virtues) knife.

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    Brands again depends on where it is made......some lower range of branded knives like Wusthof, Henkels and WMF are made in China (which sorry to say I think the quality made from China is absolutely RUBBISH!).
    ABSOLUTELY TRUE!

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    Care of quality knives is just as important. Does not mean when you buy a $500 knife means it will be sharp forever. You will need to polish it and the right way.

    Again, I agree. It is like buying an expensive Ferrari car but never polish and wax it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    I think photobum will give you a few more tips.
    Given liao.

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    Stay tuned for photobum.......................A Samurai Warrior and also.....A Professional Knife Collector!
    I do not only collect knives but I use them as well. Otherwise, I won't know how my knives perform.
    Last edited by photobum; 29th September 2008 at 07:14 AM.

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