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Thread: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

  1. #81

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by OasisG View Post
    For Global knive, i would advice you not to even try to cut a chicken wing bone or cut a fish with small bones on cause once you cut, you can see that your $100 odd knive getting a chip on the blade. Global blade is the weakest among all, though it may be sharp but hardness of the steel is inferior.

    Furthermore, Henkels, Wusthof, WMF blade takes a long time for one to sharpen in order to have the bite on your knive so as to subsequently further sharpening takes a shorter time to sharpen, wherelse Victorinoix knive blade is hard but not as hard as those German made.
    Thanks for joining.

    I do agree that Global knives are more prone to chipping than most European knives such as those made by Victorinox. Do consider the fact that Global knives are basically still Japanese knives, the HRC index is higher, thus more brittle. However with proper handling, I have seen Global knives survive through the most demanding commercial kitchens.

    It is not true that blades from Henckels, Wusthof and WMF take longer time to sharpen. Trust me on this. I have sharpen enough knives from these brands to verify my claim. You have not tried sharpening the most difficult blade yet. It belongs to a Japanese knife. It is how that person sharpen his or hers knives that matter, not the duration.
    Last edited by photobum; 26th September 2008 at 08:41 AM.

  2. #82

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by OasisG View Post
    By the way, guys, since there is so many food enthusiast in here, just a idea, why don't we find one good day if all of our times permits, meet up at some who has a place to house the group and each cook a dish for all. Haha.. well, just wondering.. Anyway, i'm French train. So how about the thread starter and the rest of the guys here?
    Haha... Good idea. However, we will have to do this in another thread. This thread is purely about kitchen knives and none others.

  3. #83

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Thanks for joining.

    I do agree that Global knives are more prone to chipping than most European knives such as those made by Victorinox. Do consider the fact that Global knives are basically still Japanese knives, the HRC index is higher, thus more brittle.

    However with proper handling, I have seen Global knives survive through the most demanding commercial kitchens.

    It is not true that blades from Henckels, Wusthof and WMF take longer time to sharpen. Trust me on this. I have sharpen enough knives from these brands to verify my claim. You have not tried sharpen the most difficult blade yet. It belongs to a Japanese knife. It is how one sharpen their knives that matters, not the time.
    You are welcome and i do understand what you mean. You are very true, Jap knives is so far the most difficult to sharpen. As for sharpening, i have gone through the "lesson" before, using those whet stones to diamond sharpening machine. But most important thing which i reckon you will agree with me is that it is the person handling the knive must feel comfortable with the knive and a person who must know how to handle a knive with the proper usage, be it you give him the sharpest knive with the best stones and honing rod, it'll still be useless, am i right? As i always tell my staffs and student, "You are the one controlling the knive, not the knive control you" and "Always respect the knive and food products".

  4. #84

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Haha... Good idea. However, we will have to do this in another thread. This thread is purely about kitchen knives and none others.
    Yeah, why not haha... but we have to "consolidate" the headcount before we could start a new thread on it. Haha.. Anyway, you are in RCA now?

  5. #85

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Next, let me introduce to all the anatomy of a traditional Japanese knife. This is a slightly different specie compared to its western counterpart.


    [sketch: photobum]


    • The tip of a traditional Japanese knife is used mainly for slicing and chopping. The curvature of the blade allows rocking for julienne cutting.
    • Most traditional Japanese knives have a spine that extend into the handle and a tang which cannot be seen externally.
    • Traditional Japanese knives have a single bevel. Most chefs love this type of bevel as it stops food from sticking onto the blade (which is very annoying) and allows food slide up and out. Most single bevel knives have a cutting angle of between 17 to 15 degrees.
    • The handle of a traditional Japanese knife is usually made of honoki (pronounced as "hon-o-key") wood, or magnolia wood in English. Such handle used to be oval-shape. Until 1960s, D-shape handles started to appear. This design allows the handle to tuck into the palm and provide more control to the user by leaving less space between handle and hand.
    Last edited by photobum; 2nd January 2009 at 07:08 AM.

  6. #86

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by OasisG View Post
    Anyway, you are in RCA now?
    Yes.

    You go there too.
    Last edited by photobum; 26th September 2008 at 08:48 AM.

  7. #87
    Member lennyl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Traditional Japanese knives have a single bevel. Most chefs love this type of bevel as it stops food from sticking onto the blade (which is very annoying) and allows food slide up and out. Most single bevel knives have a cutting angle of between 17 to 15 degrees.
    Forgive some newbie questions :

    1. Since there is only one bevel, there's obviously left handed and right handed models. When holding the knife in right hand, the beveled side should be facing which direction?

    2. I can't quite visualize how having one bevel prevents food from sticking. Can you elaborate? From descriptions of a few Santoku knives I've looked at, they say it is the air pockets / flutes at the side of the blade that prevents sticking.

    #1 leads me to a related question about technique : when slicing into thin strips, for example, do you work from right to left, far to near, or what? Assuming right handed use.

    Thanks.

  8. #88

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    1. Since there is only one bevel, there's obviously left handed and right handed models. When holding the knife in right hand, the beveled side should be facing which direction?

    Yes, you are right. There are both types of the same knife for left and right handed individual. the one shown above is for left handed.

    2. I can't quite visualize how having one bevel prevents food from sticking. Can you elaborate? From descriptions of a few Santoku knives I've looked at, they say it is the air pockets / flutes at the side of the blade that prevents sticking.

    A picture tells a thousand words;

    [sketch: photobum]

    The science behind it is actually quite simple and logical. Most traditional single bevel Japanese knives consists of two layers. The first layer is the cutting edge. The second layer is slight above the cutting edge. It is unpolished (the surface feels rougher) thus preventing food from sticking.

    #1 leads me to a related question about technique : when slicing into thin strips, for example, do you work from right to left, far to near, or what? Assuming right handed use.

    Up to individual. I do it from right to left

    Thanks

    You are welcome!
    Last edited by photobum; 2nd January 2009 at 07:08 AM.

  9. #89

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by OasisG View Post
    But most important thing which i reckon you will agree with me is that it is the person handling the knive must feel comfortable with the knive and a person who must know how to handle a knive with the proper usage, be it you give him the sharpest knive with the best stones and honing rod, it'll still be useless, am i right? As i always tell my staffs and student, "You are the one controlling the knive, not the knive control you" and "Always respect the knive and food products".
    I cried when I heard this statement "You are the one controlling the knife, not the knife control you". It is so touching... almost like watching a soap opera.

    And yes, the user has to be comfortable with the knife. Just like using a DSLR. It is pointless to keep on upgrading ones equipment when his or hers skill is .
    Last edited by photobum; 26th September 2008 at 09:42 AM.

  10. #90

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Thx Photobum on your reply to my query on Miyabi knives.
    The science behind it is really fascinating and every page on this thread gets more n more interesting.
    I am looking for a carving knife for fish (cutting through bones) and meat, what will you recommend for daily kitchen use.
    Thx in advance.

  11. #91

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by FireHouse View Post
    Thx Photobum on your reply to my query on Miyabi knives.
    The science behind it is really fascinating and every page on this thread gets more n more interesting.
    I am looking for a carving knife for fish (cutting through bones) and meat, what will you recommend for daily kitchen use.
    Thx in advance.
    You will need a sashimi knife, no doubt about it.
    Last edited by photobum; 26th September 2008 at 02:06 PM.

  12. #92

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    You will need a sashimi knife, no doubt about it.



    a
    Thx Photobum.
    Many years back, when I was into angling n deep sea fishing...my Japanese friend gave me a sashimi knife. I kept it and never intended to use it as I know nuts abt sashimi.
    Thx for the heads up.

  13. #93
    Member lennyl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Appreciate the great explanation! Thanks!

  14. #94

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by FireHouse View Post
    Thx Photobum.
    Many years back, when I was into angling n deep sea fishing...my Japanese friend gave me a sashimi knife. I kept it and never intended to use it as I know nuts abt sashimi.
    Thx for the heads up.
    For cutting into fish bones (steak cut), a deba bocho will be a better choice. Sashimi knives are mainly used for filleting fish. The blade may pit if it hits bones.
    Last edited by photobum; 27th September 2008 at 08:00 AM.

  15. #95

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Yes.

    You go there too.
    Nope, i'm currently in the educating sector teaching culinary skills, but was used to be with Les Amis group for 5 years, left after my chef Justin Quek and whole group of us quit.

  16. #96

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    I cried when I heard this statement "You are the one controlling the knife, not the knife control you". It is so touching... almost like watching a soap opera.

    And yes, the user has to be comfortable with the knife. Just like using a DSLR. It is pointless to keep on upgrading ones equipment when his or hers skill is .
    Haha, are you sure or not? so emotional and drama?.. hahaha.. well, this is a true fact and i take it serious on my students and my ex staff. The same applies to "Respect the FOOD"

    Yah, if one isn't comfortable with the "DSLR", no matter how great is the knive is, it is still back to square 1.

  17. #97

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by OasisG View Post
    Nope, i'm currently in the educating sector teaching culinary skills, but was used to be with Les Amis group for 5 years, left after my chef Justin Quek and whole group of us quit.
    Hmm.....sounds very familiar.......I am working in the F&B Industry as well but on the magazine section. Hint hint lei....which school you are from......Sunrise, Temasek, or Shatec.....?

    I think you will know someone if I am mentioned his name......Peter Knipp.....keke.

    I think Justin is still one of the best Singapore chef in French cuisine. Tasted his food in Shanghai.....and I must say it's excellent quality.

  18. #98

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla Invades View Post
    Hmm.....sounds very familiar.......I am working in the F&B Industry as well but on the magazine section. Hint hint lei....which school you are from......Sunrise, Temasek, or Shatec.....?

    I think you will know someone if I am mentioned his name......Peter Knipp.....keke.

    I think Justin is still one of the best Singapore chef in French cuisine. Tasted his food in Shanghai.....and I must say it's excellent quality.
    Haha... well, neither in the one you have mentioned. But anyway, let's just keep this a mystery.. haha... Well, actually magazine actually a few, so i think you are in one of the few companys which can travel out of the country.. Well, let's just keep it a mystery.. Justin is no doubt the iconic figure in the kitchen who have does us singapore proud by placing fine dining scene in the world map, least to said on whether does it join the rankings on the world top 100 restaurants.

  19. #99

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by OasisG View Post
    Nope, i'm currently in the educating sector teaching culinary skills, but was used to be with Les Amis group for 5 years, left after my chef Justin Quek and whole group of us quit.
    I must call you 'sensei' then.
    Last edited by photobum; 27th September 2008 at 08:02 AM.

  20. #100

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by OasisG View Post
    Haha... well, neither in the one you have mentioned. But anyway, let's just keep this a mystery.. haha... Well, actually magazine actually a few, so i think you are in one of the few companys which can travel out of the country.. Well, let's just keep it a mystery.
    Now we are talking!

    Great to know that there are a few culinary masters on ClubSnap.

    Sadly, I am just an amateur when it comes to the food industry.
    Last edited by photobum; 27th September 2008 at 08:03 AM.

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