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Thread: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

  1. #21
    Member lennyl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    ClubSnap kopitiam, where you never know what you might learn next

    Thanks for lots of interesting information, Photobum. Is there some place I can read up on how to sharpen using the Japanese method?

  2. #22

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    I don't use very expensive knives when I step into a commercial kitchen. Whenever I go for my courses, I will bring along my JA Henckel Four-Star knife set which costs about $400 for 5 blades. A good kitchen knife can easily cost more than $400 each.

    A bread knife is used only for slicing. Asian cooking, especially Chinese cooking, utilizes mainly chopping, dicing and mincing which are difficult to perform with such knife. Furthermore, due to its elongated blade, chopping and dicing with a bread knife requires more effort. Using an improper kitchen knife can cause serious injury.
    What you said is very true. I once bought a set of knives for my in law from US costing over usd2k. she cooks at high speed and can prepare a few dishes at a go (ie cuting, stewing, washing, boiling, frying). Due to the blade too sharp, she suffered a deep cut. Bandaged up, she carry on cooking.

    Good blade cuts like a razor, but your flesh is the weakest point of contact.

    As for commercial kitchen, the trend is to go towards using machines for dicing and slicing. Its more efficient, more safe, more clean (if equipment well maintained) and less skill based. I cant find a chef that can flip the knife like a swordsman without injuring himself, hence, machinery is the way to go. Well, thats my pov for a mass production facility.

    I once came across a meat specialist from ritz. He is very skillful in preparing meat for a high dollar steak. He said that a good meat cutter is not about the blades. It's the knowledge that matches the tools. He was high salaried and guess what? he was replaced by PRC for a salary 1/5 of his.
    Last edited by contaxable; 24th September 2008 at 11:56 AM.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by leekch View Post
    This is interesting.....Surprisingly, I am one who does most of the above with kitchen knives.
    You do most of the what above?

  4. #24

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    ClubSnap kopitiam, where you never know what you might learn next

    Thanks for lots of interesting information, Photobum. Is there some place I can read up on how to sharpen using the Japanese method?
    You are most welcome!

    I can teach you FOC. Just give me about two hours.
    Last edited by photobum; 24th September 2008 at 12:14 PM.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by contaxable View Post
    What you said is very true. I once bought a set of knives for my in law from US costing over usd2k. she cooks at high speed and can prepare a few dishes at a go (ie cuting, stewing, washing, boiling, frying). Due to the blade too sharp, she suffered a deep cut. Bandaged up, she carry on cooking.

    Good blade cuts like a razor, but your flesh is the weakest point of contact.

    As for commercial kitchen, the trend is to go towards using machines for dicing and slicing. Its more efficient, more safe, more clean (if equipment well maintained) and less skill based. I cant find a chef that can flip the knife like a swordsman without injuring himself, hence, machinery is the way to go. Well, thats my pov for a mass production facility.

    I once came across a meat specialist from ritz. He is very skillful in preparing meat for a high dollar steak. He said that a good meat cutter is not about the blades. It's the knowledge that matches the tools. He was high salaried and guess what? he was replaced by PRC for a salary 1/5 of his.
    From my own experience, a cut wound from a sharp knife heals faster than one cuts with a dull knife. Trust me on this, I have cut myself more than enough to notice this.

    That meat specialist was right. Many people just go for expensive things without understanding the knowledge behind (photography, unfortunately, is one of such practices). I must know my knives well enough to know how to cut certain meat, fish and vegetable. For example, one cannot use a sashimi knife (which is meant for filleting fish) to cut beef.

    By the way, I am not surprised that PRC uses only a Chinese cleaver to get his job done. Chinese cleaver is probably the most versatile cutting tool ever invented by man. It is a 'do all' knife. Don't believe me.... Just look at any Martin Yan's cooking show.
    Last edited by photobum; 24th September 2008 at 12:15 PM.

  6. #26
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    True enough...

    and even with Sashimi, there are a few knives to be used.

    Fillet,
    bone
    decorative,
    etc



    The chef of a Japanese restaurant once told us that his knive was about 2k and has to be sharpened every night...
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  7. #27

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    From my own experience, a cut wound from a sharp knife heals faster than one cuts with a dull knife. Trust me on this, I have cut myself more than enough to notice this.

    That meat specialist was right. Many people just go for expensive things without understanding the knowledge behind (photography, unfortunately, is one of such practices). I must know my knives well enough to know how to cut certain meat, fish and vegetable. For example, one cannot use a sashimi knife (which is meant for filleting fish) to cut beef.

    By the way, I am not surprised that PRC uses only a Chinese cleaver to get his job done. Chinese cleaver is probably the most versatile cutting tool ever invented by man. It is a 'do all' knife. Don't believe me.... Just look at any Martin Yan's cooking show.
    An Asian chef has many things up his sleeve. LOL Other than the cleaver (that he will use in the head chef absence) look under his table and you will find a bottle of sauce for an incredible unique taste. Fire him and you will lose that magic taste!

    And, yes, different tool, different purposes. I have caught a staff using a nice blade for prying a metal tin! Damm!
    Last edited by contaxable; 24th September 2008 at 01:20 PM.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    True enough...

    and even with Sashimi, there are a few knives to be used.

    Fillet,
    bone
    decorative,
    etc



    The chef of a Japanese restaurant once told us that his knive was about 2k and has to be sharpened every night...
    His $2K sashimi knife is considered a budget knife. Top-of-line ones can easily cost more than $10K each.

  9. #29
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    His $2K sashimi knife is considered a budget knife. Top-of-line ones can easily cost more than $10K each.


    Now, the Kill Bill comes to mind with Hattori Hanzo katanas.... wonder if there are any blades like tat on the market...
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  10. #30
    Senior Member phoakm's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    His $2K sashimi knife is considered a budget knife. Top-of-line ones can easily cost more than $10K each.
    I AM BORNFIRE!
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  11. #31

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by contaxable View Post
    I have caught a staff using a nice blade for prying a metal tin! Damm!
    This is a serious violation of a kitchen Samurai's code of honour. That staff has to be behead immediately without pity.

    Jokes aside. Use a knife as Milo tin opener is a big not not. Not only the knife is damaged, that person might even break the blade and hurt other people near him.

  12. #32

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post


    Now, the Kill Bill comes to mind with Hattori Hanzo katanas.... wonder if there are any blades like tat on the market...
    Yes, you can buy Hattori (not Hanzo's katanas) knives and they are available in Singapore. If you look through my knives collection, you will see that I have a Hattori HD 240mm western deba.

    Each top-of-line Hattori KD knife can easily cost as much as a Canon EOS 1Ds MKIII.

    OT: You can purchase an 'authentic' Hanzo sword from Ebay.
    Last edited by photobum; 24th September 2008 at 01:22 PM.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by phoakm View Post
    Yes, just like photo gears. Good kitchen knives are very expensive.
    Last edited by photobum; 24th September 2008 at 01:20 PM.

  14. #34
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    the 2-stage knife sharpener has 2 flat pre-adjusted grinding surface (mini blocks?), not wheels. are these any better? i know that motorised wheel turning at high speed is bad. i dun have those, & unlikely the common folks here have such a fancy tool too...

    IMO, i think grinding them with some water is better den dry. rite or not?

    the reason i bought (yes, me) the sharpener is that compared to the whetstone, the angle are prefixed. no worries grinding oni to blunt the knives!

  15. #35
    Moderator LOTUSfairy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    This is one dangerous place that i am threading on...

    *moves away*
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  16. #36
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Yes, you can buy Hattori (not Hanzo's katanas) knives and they are available in Singapore. If you look through my knives collection, you will see that I have a Hattori HD 240mm western deba.

    Each top-of-line Hattori KD knife can easily cost as much as a Canon EOS 1Ds MKIII.

    OT: You can purchase an 'authentic' Hanzo sword from Ebay.


    Mebbe in future.... now, I think I'll stick to the low end ones....
    Michael Lim
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  17. #37
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    I think this is the only one I would be interested in :

    SUJIHIKI KNIFE

    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  18. #38

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by sORe-EyEz View Post
    the 2-stage knife sharpener has 2 flat pre-adjusted grinding surface (mini blocks?), not wheels. are these any better? i know that motorised wheel turning at high speed is bad. i dun have those, & unlikely the common folks here have such a fancy tool too...

    IMO, i think grinding them with some water is better den dry. rite or not?

    the reason i bought (yes, me) the sharpener is that compared to the whetstone, the angle are prefixed. no worries grinding oni to blunt the knives!
    A two-stage sharpener is a good choice for retouching the edges of your knives. Some people use it to replace a honing steel. If you really want to sharpen your knives, whetstone is the only way to go.

    Yes, wet sharpening is ideal. Dry sharpening induces too much heat.

    Before I learn how to sharpen my knives with whetstones, I have the same fear as yours.... getting the wrong angle. After I learn how to do it, it is actually quite easy. With whetstones, you can 'customise' your preferred blade angle even.
    Last edited by photobum; 24th September 2008 at 01:37 PM.

  19. #39

    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    I think this is the only one I would be interested in :

    SUJIHIKI KNIFE

    This knife is known as a 240mm gyuto. I have a similar knife but it was forged by Ryusen Blazen.

    This one is still quite affordable. It costs S$500 at most.
    Last edited by photobum; 16th October 2008 at 05:16 PM.

  20. #40
    Member lennyl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen samurai.... Please fall-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    You are most welcome!

    I can teach you FOC. Just give me about two hours.
    I'd love to take you up on the offer, but I won't be in Singapore till next year

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