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Thread: how to do depth of field shots

  1. #1
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    Default how to do depth of field shots

    Hi everyone! i'm an extremely new newbie to the world of photography...and i'll like to ask questions regarding this.

    i have searched the threads and understood that DOF shots are done depending on 3 factors 1-distance 2-apeture speed 3-shutter speed.

    i have tried using the olympus c5050z but to no avail...the background still remains pretty clear along with the subject matter!

    are there any tips for this particular greenhorn?i have tried adjusting the various factors...but i still get confused...how close should i get to the subject matter?also are there any lenses for me to further decrease/increase apeture?

    thanks!

  2. #2

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    Actually, Depth of Field is influenced by 3 factors:

    1) Focal length- longer focal lengths give shallower depth of field
    2) Camera to Subject distance- the closer the camera is to the subject, the shallower the depth of field will be.
    3) Aperture(for a given format)- the larger(smaller f-number) the effective aperture, the shallower the DOF.

    Shutter speed isn't involved in DOF at all.

    Digicams have significantly more DOF compared to SLRs at any setting, f2.8 on a digicam has approximately the same DOF as f8-f11 on an SLR, hence it is difficult to get a shallow DOF.

    The only times when you can get a good DOF blur for a digicam is when you take macro shots or use a Teleconvertor at a relatively short distance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zerstorer
    Actually, Depth of Field is influenced by 3 factors:

    1) Focal length- longer focal lengths give shallower depth of field
    2) Camera to Subject distance- the closer the camera is to the subject, the shallower the depth of field will be.
    3) Aperture(for a given format)- the larger(smaller f-number) the effective aperture, the shallower the DOF.

    Shutter speed isn't involved in DOF at all.

    Digicams have significantly more DOF compared to SLRs at any setting, f2.8 on a digicam has approximately the same DOF as f8-f11 on an SLR, hence it is difficult to get a shallow DOF.

    The only times when you can get a good DOF blur for a digicam is when you take macro shots or use a Teleconvertor at a relatively short distance.
    so basically i MUST use a teleconvertor if let's say i do human photography?pictures of people with a depth of field?

    another question, is it right to say the shallower the depth of field, the more blur the background?

    and also are there any recommended settings for me to take for a "virgin shot" of say a human face?

    thanks!

    one last question...can the c5050z accept filters and lenses attachments?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Castlesinthesky
    so basically i MUST use a teleconvertor if let's say i do human photography?pictures of people with a depth of field?
    The C5050's true focal length is 7.1 - 21.3 mm. I might be wrong but my experience is to get a pleasing shallow depth of field for portraits you will need at least a 70 mm true focal length at F4. I'm not sure whether even with a teleconverter whether you will be able to blur out the background enough. Better test out the teleconverter at the shop before you buy it.

    another question, is it right to say the shallower the depth of field, the more blur the background?
    Yes.

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    adjust the blurness of the background in Photoshop.

    u can then shoot without concerning of DOF at all.

  6. #6

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    DOF is controlled mainly by the aperture and speed coordinately.

    In simpler terms, one just needs to use his/her aperture to control DOF.

    Just like pinhole camera theory, the smaller the aperture (pinhole) is, the sharper the image will be. (that providing you have a strong light to capacitate it, or to do a compensation of a longer exposure).

    A bigger aperture = to blurer images (shallow DOF). (use in low light condition or when capturing the motion).

    In contrary to normal understanding that big numeric = larger aperture, a camera lens work in the opposite. E.g , a F22 would be smaller than F5.6. so if you want a sharp image, use a bigger numerical F stop. However you would either need a strong light to capacitate it or to fix your camera on a tripod to do a long exposure.

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    Default Some notes....for reference

    Hiee....

    How about checking out the supplementary note of the Photography session that i conduct....


    The Supplementary notes....

    Hope this will get you going...

    regards,
    Sulhan

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    Quote Originally Posted by sulhan
    Hiee....

    How about checking out the supplementary note of the Photography session that i conduct....


    The Supplementary notes....

    Hope this will get you going...

    regards,
    Sulhan

    thank you! i found it most helpful....given a layman like myself.I love guys like you people around!

    going OT, what are the essential filters/lenses i should get as a newbie?
    thanks!

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    Default Hieee....

    No worries......

    Well...hope the notes will help you see photography something not that.....difficult to learn.....

    regards,
    sulhan

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    Quote Originally Posted by sulhan
    No worries......

    Well...hope the notes will help you see photography something not that.....difficult to learn.....

    regards,
    sulhan
    sulhan..one more question...is it possible to further decrease the apeture settings for the c5050z?currently i can only set it up to F8.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Castlesinthesky
    sulhan..one more question...is it possible to further decrease the apeture settings for the c5050z?currently i can only set it up to F8.
    nope. you're stuck check out the basic specs at http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympusc5050z/

    but the f/8 still gives a very deep DOF, probably equal to f/16 (roughly x2, or so i was told by some CS'ers) on slr. of course, if you work it out mathematically... it's not that value, for sure!

    the better way to try pull off a portrait shot on the 5050 (i did this on the 4040), was to open the aperture wide at f/1.8, use macro mode, and just stay in the longest distance that's still within the macro mode, probably 80? or 100? cm from the subject. keep in mind that the closer you go, there will be a circular distortion to the subject.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    nope. you're stuck check out the basic specs at http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympusc5050z/

    but the f/8 still gives a very deep DOF, probably equal to f/16 (roughly x2, or so i was told by some CS'ers) on slr. of course, if you work it out mathematically... it's not that value, for sure!

    the better way to try pull off a portrait shot on the 5050 (i did this on the 4040), was to open the aperture wide at f/1.8, use macro mode, and just stay in the longest distance that's still within the macro mode, probably 80? or 100? cm from the subject. keep in mind that the closer you go, there will be a circular distortion to the subject.
    i have kept in mind what you people have advised me...however when i do so....apparently....the subject in question (foreground) gets blurred out while the background remains focused! why is that so!?

    and the lowest/biggest apeture setting for the 5050z is F2 only...seems like a really small range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Castlesinthesky
    i have kept in mind what you people have advised me...however when i do so....apparently....the subject in question (foreground) gets blurred out while the background remains focused! why is that so!?

    and the lowest/biggest apeture setting for the 5050z is F2 only...seems like a really small range.
    not really. it is indeed a fairly big range. it's f/1.8 all the way to f/8.
    and you can go half f-stops as well, with "funny" f-stops like 2.3, 2.6 etc - at least that what i could get on my 4040 then.

    you have to turn on the MACRO mode when you're focusing on a nearer range subject (human?) and if you try it, you'll see how well it works. i've shots some portrait-style photos (they're not works of art, obviously ) but too bad, the CS webspace server is down, so i can't show you much...

    you can try when the servers are up by this link: http://sehsuan.clubsnap.org/test.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    not really. it is indeed a fairly big range. it's f/1.8 all the way to f/8.
    and you can go half f-stops as well, with "funny" f-stops like 2.3, 2.6 etc - at least that what i could get on my 4040 then.

    you have to turn on the MACRO mode when you're focusing on a nearer range subject (human?) and if you try it, you'll see how well it works. i've shots some portrait-style photos (they're not works of art, obviously ) but too bad, the CS webspace server is down, so i can't show you much...

    you can try when the servers are up by this link: http://sehsuan.clubsnap.org/test.jpg

    yea...sehsuan....thanks for the reply...but i was wondering about the above question....why does the foreground/subject...remain blurred?and the background remains clear?

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    perhaps the camera is having a hard time trying to tie down focus on a say, mainly flat colour foreground? in that case you might want to use the manual focus mode...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Castlesinthesky
    yea...sehsuan....thanks for the reply...but i was wondering about the above question....why does the foreground/subject...remain blurred?and the background remains clear?
    The focus is on the background rather than on the foreground/subject.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by kelvinang
    The focus is on the background rather than on the foreground/subject.
    usually is due to
    - background is more contrast than foreground
    - you have position your cam too close to the object and cause the focusing is out of range , thus the cam will focus the background. always know ur cam focusing range.
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

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