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Thread: Polarizing fliter?

  1. #1

    Default Polarizing fliter?

    HI all,
    I am new into photography, 450D + 17-55mm 2.8lens. I cant seem to shoot proper pictures in the bright daylight, say 1130am this morning in the parks. Its Just too bright. I tried taking a closeup picture of a Sunflower and its just not showing well.

    Does a Polarizing filter for my 17-55lens solve the bright sunny daylight pictures?

    WHat abt the closeup? what micro lens do you guys use? I am in a bit of budget here, as my next targetted buy is a 70-200 F4

  2. #2
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    Quote Originally Posted by highbury View Post
    HI all,
    I am new into photography, 450D + 17-55mm 2.8lens. I cant seem to shoot proper pictures in the bright daylight, say 1130am this morning in the parks. Its Just too bright. I tried taking a closeup picture of a Sunflower and its just not showing well.

    Does a Polarizing filter for my 17-55lens solve the bright sunny daylight pictures?

    WHat abt the closeup? what micro lens do you guys use? I am in a bit of budget here, as my next targetted buy is a 70-200 F4
    Any pictures and settings to show ?
    Try to shoot with a smaller aperture or use higher shutter speeds. And no high ISO settings.
    The picture should be less bright.

    A polariser can act like an ND filter to cut down light as well. Might help but it also has other uses. Not sure if it is entirely necessary to cut down the light for ur situation.

    There are many micro/macro lenses available. The canon folks here can further enlighten you on this.

    My advice is not to rush and overspend on your budget first. After some practice, the thing you need / or do not need will dawn on you.

    Meanwhile read more too . There is so much basics to learn for photography

    Ryan
    Last edited by giantcanopy; 21st September 2008 at 05:08 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    Quote Originally Posted by highbury View Post
    HI all,
    I am new into photography, 450D + 17-55mm 2.8lens. I cant seem to shoot proper pictures in the bright daylight, say 1130am this morning in the parks. Its Just too bright. I tried taking a closeup picture of a Sunflower and its just not showing well.

    Does a Polarizing filter for my 17-55lens solve the bright sunny daylight pictures?

    WHat abt the closeup? what micro lens do you guys use? I am in a bit of budget here, as my next targetted buy is a 70-200 F4
    You mean the picture is over-exposed? Any examples to show?

    Try using a reflector board to block off some of the sunlight or use a diffuser to reduce the harshness of the sun. Also, use the lowest ISO and a smaller aperture with higher shutter speed to compensate.

    A polariser will reduce the EV slightly but will not be a cure-all.

    Macro lens on the cheap? Consider the Tamron 90mm...
    Michael Lim
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    What settings were you using, and as usual, sample pic? With EXIF data preferably. A picture (and it's data) speaks a thousand words.
    Meow!

  5. #5
    Member gymak90's Avatar
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    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    Usually the problem is the lack of light, not the opposite.

    The manual might have said using a polariser will help, but actually not by much. At most 1 stop down.
    There many ways to correct. I wonder if you're using M mode
    Reduce ISO to maybe 100. Increase shutter speed. Reduce aperture if you don't mind losing bokeh.

    17-55 f2.8 is a good lens, try to fully utilise it then decide on an expansion. No point getting something you can't use and won't use.

    Like what others have said before, showing us our shooting data (EXIF) will help.
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    Quote Originally Posted by highbury View Post
    HI all,
    I am new into photography, 450D + 17-55mm 2.8lens. I cant seem to shoot proper pictures in the bright daylight, say 1130am this morning in the parks. Its Just too bright. I tried taking a closeup picture of a Sunflower and its just not showing well.

    Does a Polarizing filter for my 17-55lens solve the bright sunny daylight pictures?

    WHat abt the closeup? what micro lens do you guys use? I am in a bit of budget here, as my next targetted buy is a 70-200 F4
    On bright day light, choose a small aperture like f/8. unless absolutely necessary, do not choose below f/8, meaning f/10 .... f/22 etc.... Ditraction on DX APS-C sensor start at around f/8 meaning the smaller aperture u go, the blurrer your image becomes.

    If you are on Aperture Priority(Av), your camera metering system will find the right shutte speed required. Sometimes even the fastest shutter speed on your camera like 1/8000 is not sufficient and the panel will show up "HI" to indicate overexposure. In this case, you can buy a ND filter. It comes in different f-stops. These filters will cut down on the light while not affecting the colours entering the lens.

    Polarizer block reflective lights that are normally bouncing of at different phase from the directed lights. It's is effective to directional ND filter, though not exactly one. I have read about using 2 polarizer filter to simulate a ND filter. In theory it works, practically, I don't own 2 to try out yet. But the problem is vignetting will comes into action when your filter is too thick.
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    You mean the picture is over-exposed?

    A polariser will reduce the EV slightly but will not be a cure-all.
    Quote Originally Posted by David Kwok View Post

    I have read about using 2 polarizer filter to simulate a ND filter.
    In fact, polarizing filter on plants has a better use than just as an ND filter. Light directly reflected from shiny plant surfaces are polarized too. polarizing filter can be used to cut the directly reflected light, thus leaving the 'colors' only. Since the colors loss there vibrancy when the leaf/petal is reflecting the white light, polarizer can make the colors 'pop' more. Try polarizing filter on a sun-lit grass patch to see what i mean. If TS's problem was with colors, may be he took photos when the surfaces were reflecting light directly into the lens.
    But as everyone said, you'd better show us a photo.

  8. #8
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    The TS did mention it was too bright....
    Michael Lim
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  9. #9
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    actually what from TS description about what he intent to shoot is very vague.
    how can it be too bright? can't he use a lower ISO, higher shutter speed or smaller aperture?
    or is it too many hot spots?

    without further information given, all suggestions are only base on assuming.
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Polarizing fliter?

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    The TS did mention it was too bright....
    sometimes the whitewash due to surface reflection can contribute to the perception of "too bright"ness too. *assuming such a case*, Polarizer can do a better job than an ND filter because it mostly blocks only the bad kind of light. Anyway i don't see why an ND filter is necessary in this scenario, unless TS needs very large apertures or slow shutter speeds?

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