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Thread: Frame

  1. #1
    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
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    Default Frame



    A TFCD collaboration with Nec Hezner. My concept was "Urban Tarzan", an urban wild man. This photo was achieved by layering and blending, like a faux HDR. Shot in RAW and converted.

    Please ignore the watermark.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by redstone View Post
    A TFCD collaboration with Nec Hezner. My concept was "Urban Tarzan", an urban wild man. This photo was achieved by layering and blending, like a faux HDR. Shot in RAW and converted.

    Please ignore the watermark.
    I really like the approach, the idea, and the mood. The technical aspect involved is also quite commendable.

    Ok, back to the image. These are generally my observation on what works and what not.

    When I first looked at the image, couple impressions hit me.
    I see 4 distinctive layers, the window frame, the subject and the wall behind. I also see 3 distinctive groupings, the wall to the left (foreground), a man within the windown frame and the wall in the back through the window (backround). I also noticed one very dominating freature, the broken glass. And last, I saw the subject again.

    Here lies the overall problem, the subject, our "urban tarzan", is the last thing that registered.

    The subject needs to stand out a lot more. The broken window pane is also creating a problem. It is obstructing the subject. It hid the subject. If we get the feeling that the subject is hiding behind the glass, it might work, but I dont see it now. It is also serving as another frame for the subject, which is a duplicating effort, we have the window already. The paint on the glass is also a problem. I would preferred plain dirty glass to this.

    The white paint on the way is a good touch, but it's too much and too bright, too distracting. So are the picture frames in the back, a good touch but too much and too bright. The light falling onto the background wall, throught the window frame from the left and from the shadow casted by the broken glass on the right side of the window frame, it has great potential. However, right now, it's jsut there doing nothing.

    Overall, the contrast is a first looks good, but after looking at the image awhile, flattens out.

    I think what you can do is work on those 4 layers, making each layer stand on it's own, will give a it a more 3D look.
    deadpoet
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Frame

    I like the framing and mood of the photo, but agree with DP that the subject should stand out more. My personal preference would be to improve the contrast and to recover some of the shadow details in the image (e.g. model's hair) to give it a bit more pop.
    e.g.
    Last edited by zaren; 21st September 2008 at 02:08 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Frame

    The composition is kinda creepy, hope this is your intention to make it this way.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Deadpoet View Post

    Here lies the overall problem, the subject, our "urban tarzan", is the last thing that registered.

    The subject needs to stand out a lot more. The broken window pane is also creating a problem. It is obstructing the subject. It hid the subject. If we get the feeling that the subject is hiding behind the glass, it might work, but I dont see it now. It is also serving as another frame for the subject, which is a duplicating effort, we have the window already. The paint on the glass is also a problem. I would preferred plain dirty glass to this.
    My sentiments exactly, too much distractions all around.
    Urban Tarzan = "wild" comes to mind; but the subject here seemed to be too tame behind the frame. That messy hairdo is the only thing that may relate to the objective, then there's no more.

    Maybe if the subject is climbing out from the broken window with that fierce look... just maybe it would make some impact.
    Already abused my D40 and D80 for my flickr

  6. #6
    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Deadpoet View Post
    I really like the approach, the idea, and the mood. The technical aspect involved is also quite commendable.

    Ok, back to the image. These are generally my observation on what works and what not.

    When I first looked at the image, couple impressions hit me.
    I see 4 distinctive layers, the window frame, the subject and the wall behind. I also see 3 distinctive groupings, the wall to the left (foreground), a man within the windown frame and the wall in the back through the window (backround). I also noticed one very dominating freature, the broken glass. And last, I saw the subject again.

    Here lies the overall problem, the subject, our "urban tarzan", is the last thing that registered.

    The subject needs to stand out a lot more. The broken window pane is also creating a problem. It is obstructing the subject. It hid the subject. If we get the feeling that the subject is hiding behind the glass, it might work, but I dont see it now. It is also serving as another frame for the subject, which is a duplicating effort, we have the window already. The paint on the glass is also a problem. I would preferred plain dirty glass to this.

    The white paint on the way is a good touch, but it's too much and too bright, too distracting. So are the picture frames in the back, a good touch but too much and too bright. The light falling onto the background wall, throught the window frame from the left and from the shadow casted by the broken glass on the right side of the window frame, it has great potential. However, right now, it's jsut there doing nothing.

    Overall, the contrast is a first looks good, but after looking at the image awhile, flattens out.

    I think what you can do is work on those 4 layers, making each layer stand on it's own, will give a it a more 3D look.
    Thanks for the comment. Will take note.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Frame

    1. move subject more to left so jagged shards don't cut into his head and he is completely isolated.

    2. PP more glass shards so that it completes edge the square window/opening - may be hard to do.

    3. spill light coming through the opening is distracting. need to flag the interior light.

    4. zaren lightening is good but maybe more, so foreground exterior becomes relatively darker to interior, or maybe that spoils your intended effect? namely mysterious, ghostly, obscurity?

    5. use a gobo/cookie to cast shadows or just PP/burn shadows onto exterior wall?

    6. too little of man to know/see if wild or not

  8. #8

    Default Re: Frame

    i think the original is fine for me, i like the darkness, and i think this would work well with urban acidish tones too (more on the dark greenish side)

    i just wish you'd correct the horizontals and verticals, the wonky "frame within a frame" where the horizontals and verticals are haywire spoil the picture for me.

    maybe consider some texturing..

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