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Thread: GND Filter

  1. #21
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by takeshi.lum View Post
    GND & Grad filter? arent they the same?
    A little different. Unlike a typical GND, a reverse grad is darkest in the transition zone, and fades outwards to the other end. Good for holding the bright sun at the horizon since it is where it is brightest. Of course in other instance you can always shift the dark transition elsewhere to fit the situation.

    Here is one of the more popular reverse grad which I use

    Here is a little writeup which I came up with regarding GNDs

    Ryan
    Last edited by giantcanopy; 4th September 2008 at 08:27 PM.

  2. #22

    Default Re: GND Filter

    then where can i get these filters?

  3. #23
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: GND Filter

    Hi

    The Singh Ray reverse grad filters can be gotten only from their own websites. I have read online of another reverse grad maker that calls by another name but I haven seen one yet.

    Why not have a try with the usual GND and experiment first. Can be commonly gotten from CS or the local shops.

    Ryan

  4. #24
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by takeshi.lum View Post
    i dun mind using the rectangular ones but they are kind of troublsome to bring ard cos i dun hav a large camera bag.. i not only need to bring the frame but the rings as well..
    You can get the Cokin P series filter holder with a 77mm adapter ring. 77mm is the biggest filter size you'll find on the common lenses, there are only a few lenses with bigger diameter. If you have a lens with 77mm filter thread you can directly mount the filter holder. For lenses with smaller filter just get the step-up rings (8-10 dollars each at Orient Photo). Easy to carry around. I had a look at the Cokin universal filter holder but I don't trust those 3 screws that hold the ring to the lens.
    Filters you can also get at Orient Photo (Sim Lim Square, 6th floor). They have Cokin GND and other colour filters.

  5. #25

    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by giantcanopy View Post
    Hi

    The Singh Ray reverse grad filters can be gotten only from their own websites. I have read online of another reverse grad maker that calls by another name but I haven seen one yet.

    Why not have a try with the usual GND and experiment first. Can be commonly gotten from CS or the local shops.

    Ryan
    i tried calling CP for GND filters but they say they dun hav it leh.. some other photo stores dun hav as well..

    i am just looking for the normal filters.

  6. #26

  7. #27
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: GND Filter

    There are some MO online as well.

    For example :

    http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373401

    ( This is just a random search example, not promoting any particular brands )

    Ryan

  8. #28

    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by giantcanopy View Post
    There are some MO online as well.

    For example :

    http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373401

    ( This is just a random search example, not promoting any particular brands )

    Ryan


    wanted to get frm him but he can only meet at eunos n not any other place. eunos is very very far for me to travel to. are there shops that carry them?

  9. #29

    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by teebs View Post
    i need the filters before sun so i cant order online.

  10. #30
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: GND Filter

    Cathay photo has them ( not sure about the Marina branch )
    but they carry the more expensive Lee filters, not sure if they sell other types

    Ryan

  11. #31

    Default Re: GND Filter

    i've called CP's marina branch but they said they dun hav GND filters.. the branch at penisular is renovating..

    how much does a Lee GND filter cost?

  12. #32
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by takeshi.lum View Post
    i've called CP's marina branch but they said they dun hav GND filters.. the branch at penisular is renovating..

    how much does a Lee GND filter cost?
    The Lee filter dimensions are larger unless u asked specifically for the P size.
    Not sure of other filter prices since i only stick to Singh Rays. But might be about 100 over per piece ?

    U can try putting up on BnS and see

    Ryan

  13. #33

    Default Re: GND Filter

    What's the difference between CPL and GND?

  14. #34

    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by Pokka View Post
    What's the difference between CPL and GND?
    A polarizing filter can be used to darken overly light skies. Because the clouds are relatively unchanged, the contrast between the clouds and the sky is increased. Atmospheric haze and reflected sunlight are also reduced, and in color photographs overall color saturation is increased. Polarizers are often used to deal with situations involving reflections, such as those involving water or glass, including pictures taken through glass windows (this uses the phenomenon of Brewster's angle).

    There are two types of polarizing filters available, linear polarizers and circular polarizers (or CPL filters). With the exception of how they interact with some autofocus and metering mechanisms, they have exactly the same effect. Both transmit one of two states of linearly polarized light. The difference is that a circular polarizer alters the light leaving the filter and entering the camera by using a quarter-wave plate to circularly polarize that light. This has the same effect photographically as a linear polarizer, reducing glare in the scene. The metering and auto-focus sensors in certain cameras, including virtually all auto-focus SLRs, will not work properly with linear polarizers because the beam-splitters used to split off the light for focusing and metering are polarization-dependent. Circular polarizers work with all types of cameras, because mirrors and beam-splitters reflect both circular polarizations equally.

    A Graduated Neutral Density (GND) filter is a neutral density filter that varies the effect with a gradient so it can be used to compress dynamic range across the entire scene. This can be beneficial when the difference between highlights and shadows of a scene are too great to allow for proper exposure for both.

  15. #35

    Default Re: GND Filter

    thank you for the explanation,teebs. really useful for a newbie like me :~)

  16. #36

    Default Re: GND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by teebs View Post
    A polarizing filter can be used to darken overly light skies. Because the clouds are relatively unchanged, the contrast between the clouds and the sky is increased. Atmospheric haze and reflected sunlight are also reduced, and in color photographs overall color saturation is increased. Polarizers are often used to deal with situations involving reflections, such as those involving water or glass, including pictures taken through glass windows (this uses the phenomenon of Brewster's angle).

    There are two types of polarizing filters available, linear polarizers and circular polarizers (or CPL filters). With the exception of how they interact with some autofocus and metering mechanisms, they have exactly the same effect. Both transmit one of two states of linearly polarized light. The difference is that a circular polarizer alters the light leaving the filter and entering the camera by using a quarter-wave plate to circularly polarize that light. This has the same effect photographically as a linear polarizer, reducing glare in the scene. The metering and auto-focus sensors in certain cameras, including virtually all auto-focus SLRs, will not work properly with linear polarizers because the beam-splitters used to split off the light for focusing and metering are polarization-dependent. Circular polarizers work with all types of cameras, because mirrors and beam-splitters reflect both circular polarizations equally.

    A Graduated Neutral Density (GND) filter is a neutral density filter that varies the effect with a gradient so it can be used to compress dynamic range across the entire scene. This can be beneficial when the difference between highlights and shadows of a scene are too great to allow for proper exposure for both.

    Thank you! Now that's learning through a forum with all these helpful members like teebs

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