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Thread: How much do you value your education?

  1. #1
    psyche
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    Default How much do you value your education?

    Have been wondering about this for a long time...what do you get out of your education?

    I was flipping through my old notes, even rough papers where I did all the complicated math stuffs at school: calculus, electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, etc etc... They look impressive to me now! Didn't know I could churn all that out last time! BUT oh boy, do they look alien to me now!!! Hahaha.

    Makes me wonder... how much do we use what we learnt in the past? Since pri school, our parents and teachers will tell us, study hard, get good grades so can get into good secondary school. In there, again there'll be the attempt to want to study well to get into ...where else??? A good jc. Then for the brighter lot, they'll try to aim for a scholarship or at least well enough to get the course they want at uni.

    I have friends who did well in their O and A levels and came from good schools. When they went to university, their grades somehow suffered. They were lost. ALl along, there was a clear reason why they wanted to do well...in the uni, suddenly, they wonder: What's next?

    And even for those who eventually did reasonably well in uni, when they came out to work, they hardly used whatever they learnt in the past. And they earn a measly $2000 or so as a typical graduate. Pay taxes, bills after bills, especially for those dreaming of buying a car and getting married, etc etc.

    Conversely, there are those who do not have even A levels. In the time their peers go to uni, they learn how to do business. Nevermind they don't have the cert. But they're earning big bucks now and drive a BMW, Mercs....

    Makes me wonder... which is the path to take?

    What's your take on education?

  2. #2
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    Education let you know that there is nothing really great about being highly educated

    If you never go to U, you'll never know what is so great about U education. Like me I've being there, I know there is nothing great about U education. A decent skill in Electronic designing and software programming worth thousand times more that a Degree cert. But if I never being there, how would I be convince in the 1st place

  3. #3

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    Think people often miss the point of education. its not all about grades. its about learning how to work wif people, accepting responsibilities, learning fast ...etc...an environment that a school or Uni strives to provide that will help us when we graduate and work next time.

    the subjects dat we learn in school? i can say that a large proportion is redundant. its jus a means to an end (get a degree or graduate) that is so valued here.

    nonetheless, i still miss school life. am doing my internship now for my final year...n i would really wanna be one of those going back to campus next monday!!! sadly...it is not to be...at least till next year.

  4. #4

    Default Re: How much do you value your education?

    Originally posted by psyche
    Have been wondering about this for a long time...what do you get out of your education?

    I was flipping through my old notes, even rough papers where I did all the complicated math stuffs at school: calculus, electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, etc etc... They look impressive to me now! Didn't know I could churn all that out last time! BUT oh boy, do they look alien to me now!!! Hahaha.

    Makes me wonder... how much do we use what we learnt in the past? Since pri school, our parents and teachers will tell us, study hard, get good grades so can get into good secondary school. In there, again there'll be the attempt to want to study well to get into ...where else??? A good jc. Then for the brighter lot, they'll try to aim for a scholarship or at least well enough to get the course they want at uni.

    I have friends who did well in their O and A levels and came from good schools. When they went to university, their grades somehow suffered. They were lost. ALl along, there was a clear reason why they wanted to do well...in the uni, suddenly, they wonder: What's next?

    And even for those who eventually did reasonably well in uni, when they came out to work, they hardly used whatever they learnt in the past. And they earn a measly $2000 or so as a typical graduate. Pay taxes, bills after bills, especially for those dreaming of buying a car and getting married, etc etc.

    Conversely, there are those who do not have even A levels. In the time their peers go to uni, they learn how to do business. Nevermind they don't have the cert. But they're earning big bucks now and drive a BMW, Mercs....

    Makes me wonder... which is the path to take?

    What's your take on education?
    Why not start a poll? Based on what you've said above, there are 2 choices:

    [1] Go to university, come out and earn $2000 a month
    [2] don't go to university. Do business and earn big bucks and drive BMW/Mercs.


  5. #5
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    The more you learn, the more get yourself into this tiny little box the governement had drawn for you. Move and you knock yourself to the sides of the box.

    That's why N/O level undergrads now drive mercedes, goes for golf while their businesses are handled by their employees. And people like us sit in office and earn less then what they do.

    Looking back at education I can only say they've given a brief outline to life. Common knowledge or common sense.

    How much is being used in work? To me JC was an extra step to tertiary education. 10 years of English, Science, Maths etc etc. And another 2 years of specialisation?? When you specialise, is the time you go into tertiary education. And when you work, what you study in poly/uni. About 30% of it comes to real life with you. Other then that. I think I've already forgotton most about what I've studied since secondary school.

    I can say studying up till secondary and then heading for Poly is good for me. Provided you know what you want to specialise in. Getting a degree is never a problem for diploma grads. Ask me

    I'm also taking part-time degree now. Finishing soon also.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Originally posted by jasonpgc
    Education let you know that there is nothing really great about being highly educated

    If you never go to U, you'll never know what is so great about U education. Like me I've being there, I know there is nothing great about U education. A decent skill in Electronic designing and software programming worth thousand times more that a Degree cert. But if I never being there, how would I be convince in the 1st place
    Well Said ...

    its about learning how to work wif people, accepting responsibilities, learning fast ...etc...an environment that a school or Uni strives to provide that will help us when we graduate and work next time.
    You can do all that in the work force ... you don't need a uni environment to teach you that.

  7. #7
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    I will say that education is critical to develop the level of thinking ... for those who manage to be rich with a 'O' Levels or none at all did it because they are street wise and have all the luck ...

    imagine what you can achieve if you have a degree, you are street wise and all the luck ...

    I believe you have to be born ... an excellent entrepreneur or leader ... anything else doesn't help.

  8. #8

    Default

    One has to look at education as nothing more than training of the mind, no matter at what level of education. After that, its all down to one's ability to adapt to situations for solving problems. Education qualifiaction definitely does not have any bearing on actual work capabilities... I have first class honours degree engineers under me who are absolutely hopeless at solving practical industrial engineering problems and have to turn to the workers on the shop floor for advice on the fundamentals!

    To a certain extend, the route of getting into good JCs and then into the Uni is not always the best in terms of understanding practical issues! More practical-orientated course structures (such as Poly-grads) are of more value to the industry and also to the individual themselves in terms of actual useful knowledge and practical know-how.

    Just my 2 cents worth...

  9. #9
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    I value my education very much as it is an opportunity for a guy like me from a very poor family to attain much in life. It is sort of like My Singapore Journey akin to Colin Powell's My American Journey

    Honestly, without a proper education, I would not be where I am now enjoying the benefits of life. Another is reason in my line of work, paper qualification is important.

    Having said that, education is suppose to make the person a better person, not necessarily richer or wealthier. It makes a world of difference to be rich and well behaved as opposed to those who are rich but behave badly.

    I think there is the correct emphasis to place value on education, as it is the tool to allow people who are from disadvantaged background to rise up the social ladder.

    But it is equally important not to put too much empahsis on education and make it an end all and be all. I think we have to come to an understanding that those who are not educationally gifted too are human beings, and deserves our respect no matter what education level they have managed to attain.

    Finally the amount of money one makes to me, makes no difference. I don't think there is a co-relation between education and money unless u are looking from the angle of Govt Scholars. But then again, u can be a not so educated entreprenuer but u still earn more than a Minister!

  10. #10

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    Originally posted by espn
    I can say studying up till secondary and then heading for Poly is good for me. Provided you know what you want to specialise in. Getting a degree is never a problem for diploma grads. Ask me

    I'm also taking part-time degree now. Finishing soon also.
    I can vouch for that too... not just the basic degree... can even go all the way... doctoral and post-doctoral as well!

  11. #11

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    Just wanna add that for every cert-less person that makes it big, there are probably 10000 cert-less people trying very hard to make ends meet.

    For every uni grad earning $2000, there are probably 10000 uni grads earning 5 digit monthly salaries...

    If u think u can beat chance, by all means go try the cert-less route from rags to riches heheh


  12. #12
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    I go to university for self-actualisation. I want to learn something I like, as much as I can, even if it doesn't command a very high pay.

    Otherwise why would I take Physics, something not marketable in the job arena?

  13. #13

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    For a uni grad, earning $2k on graduation, is not bad already - in this time and age.

    It's not just about education only. It's about your value - your knowledge, your drive, your ability to impart and most of all... how you can contribute to a company (or any other company).

    Funny thing is: I'm a salesperson.

    I don't earn much. My customers earn from me instead. They don't have to buy from me. They can learn from me.

    They learn something new. Customers will become more confident of themselves and of the products they want to purchase.

    It's my life's work. I'm an educator! THE EDUCATOR @ CHAMOXA.

  14. #14
    psyche
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    Of cos I'm not advocating to be rich, don't study well at school. Neither do I think if you have a degree, you can't make it big.

    I don't quite agree with eug's explanation that you have to be a "born excellent entreureneur". I think change is possible and creativity can be developed. It's how you are affected by your parents' and the educational system's influence. I've read and heard of people who come from totally wretched states but they decided to "turn their lives" around and now live differently. And that was it...

    I'm just wondering out loud for myself about all those worrisome nights solving tons and tons of mathematical equations before the BIG exams. The mugging, the rushing for tutorials, spotting questions, the frantic doing of 10 year's series. Now if you ask me, I can remember the jist of it but ask me to solve the problems, I need a lot of time to read the concepts again. They are hardly useful in my daily life too much as some would justify tertiary learning makes you more analytical blah blah blah.

    I've reached a stage where I question what's all those years were for... and inevitably, I come to the answer: I want that cert cos for years, people around me had been telling me with that cert, I can earn a good living. Nothing is further from the truth. What they REALLY meant was, to be rich either in knowlege or in terms of $$$, I need to THINK. Not necessarily get that cert.

    That's precisely what an N level guy in the army told me which I couldn't appreciate back then. He told me, u A level guys so cham ah... got to serve extra 6 months of NS and then spend another few years to study so hard....Worth it or not? Do they teach you how to make money and live comfortably? After Army, I'm going to look for jobs where I can grow and perhaps make it big...

    I've never been through education on financial planning. I've never been taught how to invest my money. I've only been taught a little on how to handle relationships. I think these are the things I'd have really liked to be taught.

    Those tons of math formulas I learnt are totally useless to me now. Of cos, for those who are into research or higher learning, or future Einsteins wannabes, that's the path to take naturally. But for me, if I could trade my degree for something else, it'd be learning the finer points of finances and real world relationships.

    Heh-heh, relating back to photography (just to lighten up the above quite serious discussion), it's so that I can buy more white lenses (know what I'm talking about here right!) without burning a hole in my bank account!

    Juz my thots and sharing...

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    I think change is possible and creativity can be developed. It's how you are affected by your parents' and the educational system's influence.
    Hi,

    I agree with this point ... what I am saying is that some characteristics that are crucial for a successful excellent entrepreneur are inborn, the environment matters too ... but without the inborn characteristics ... then the entrepreneur may not make it there ... there are some who fit the bill, so to speak. Unfortunately, they just don't have the luck and never made it ... these people are what I'll say not born for it ... its faith ... sometimes their relentless efforts to strife to be successful entrepreneur can wreck their families.

    Just my 2 cents worth ...

  16. #16
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    Of all the subjects that I took in secondary school, only 2 are relevant to me now. rest are useless.

    English and Biology.

    I dun need maths, physics, history or even accountancy.......

  17. #17

    Default

    I treasure my education alot.. My family is not rich and thus.. most of the time.. i try my best to get scholarships..

    My secondary sch education was paid for my MOE.. edusave scholarship for independent schools.. thank god.. $200 a month will kill me..

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