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Thread: Colour profile question

  1. #1
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    Question Colour profile question

    Sorry, have another question, this time regarding colour profiles.

    When I opened the image file in PhotoShop, it says the image contains a colour profile sRGB which doesn't match my monitor profile (which I set using the Adobe wizard).

    Should I keep the sRGB profile? What happens if this profile is lost (as in when the image is edited with MS Photo Editor)?

    thanx much.

  2. #2

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    Whether to keep sRGB profile embedded in your picture will depend on the application u intend to use that picture in. Note that having the ICC profile embedded in the photo will result in a slightly larger file size as compared to one that doesn't.

    Let's say u have some photos in the sRGB color space and u are saving the photos into jpeg for web use, it won't be necessary to embed the sRGB profile in the pictures as it serves no purpose and your pictures will take slightly more time to get loaded in the internet browser. Or maybe you would like to create slideshows in ACDSee for example, embedding won't be necessary either. Internet browsers and certain picture viewers are not colour profile aware and will automatically display pictures in the sRGB colour space rather accurately.

    However, if the applications u r using these same photos for, is colour profile aware, like Photoshop, it will be good to have the relevant colour profiles embedded in them. Or else these applications might not know what to do with them and prompt u for the colour space to open them in.

    Also, why are you using your monitor profile as your Photoshop RGB working space? This is rather puzzling.

  3. #3
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    Originally posted by Noir
    Whether to keep sRGB profile embedded in your picture will depend on the application u intend to use that picture in. Note that having the ICC profile embedded in the photo will result in a slightly larger file size as compared to one that doesn't.

    Let's say u have some photos in the sRGB color space and u are saving the photos into jpeg for web use, it won't be necessary to embed the sRGB profile in the pictures as it serves no purpose and your pictures will take slightly more time to get loaded in the internet browser. Or maybe you would like to create slideshows in ACDSee for example, embedding won't be necessary either. Internet browsers and certain picture viewers are not colour profile aware and will automatically display pictures in the sRGB colour space rather accurately.

    However, if the applications u r using these same photos for, is colour profile aware, like Photoshop, it will be good to have the relevant colour profiles embedded in them. Or else these applications might not know what to do with them and prompt u for the colour space to open them in.

    Also, why are you using your monitor profile as your Photoshop RGB working space? This is rather puzzling.
    Thanx Noir, I'm new to both photography and photoshop and I'm unfamiliar with the concept of colour space. I just use Adobe wizard to "tune" my monitor to get the "right" setting.

    I want to retain the colour fidelity of the images. I presume that if the colour profiles matches than the monitor should display the image "as it was captured"? And similarly for printers it should print the image with the right colours and shades?

    In the first place should I be embedding sRGB colour profile in the pictures? I think this is what was configured into the camera.

    thanx again for your help.

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by hwchoy
    I just use Adobe wizard to "tune" my monitor to get the "right" setting.
    Calibrating your monitor like what u mentioned is the correct first step in the colour management workflow.

    Originally posted by hwchoy
    I want to retain the colour fidelity of the images. I presume that if the colour profiles matches than the monitor should display the image "as it was captured"?
    Doing something like this will definitely ensure that your image will look accurate in Photoshop and other colour space aware applications alone. But what about the host of other applications that are not colour space aware that only understands the sRGB colour space? So try to use or sRGB colour spaces in Photoshop. Your photos will turn out accurate in almost all photo display applications this way.

    Originally posted by hwchoy
    And similarly for printers it should print the image with the right colours and shades?
    To get your printer to print out relatively accurate colours and shades, try to get and install, if available, the colour profile for the specific make and model of printer you intend to print to and converting your pictures to that colour space using Photoshop ( Mode ---> Convert to Profile---> Destination Space [select your printer profile]). Failing which, print the photos in sRGB colour space. Most consumer printers work rather decently in sRGB. However, don't print photos that are in your monitor's colour space, cos the printer won't understand that colour space. It may result in weird colours.

    Originally posted by hwchoy
    In the first place should I be embedding sRGB colour profile in the pictures? I think this is what was configured into the camera.
    You can always embed the profile in a picture, there will be no harm done. It is just that it will not be necessary if the application opening it is not colour space aware.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Noir; 21st July 2003 at 06:32 PM.

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by Noir
    Calibrating your monitor like what u mentioned is the correct first step in the colour management workflow.


    Doing something like this will definitely ensure that your image will look accurate in Photoshop and other colour space aware applications alone. But what about the host of other applications that are not colour space aware that only understands the sRGB colour space? So try to use or sRGB colour spaces in Photoshop. Your photos will turn out accurate in almost all photo display applications this way.


    To get your printer to print out relatively accurate colours and shades, try to get and install, if available, the colour profile for the specific make and model of printer you intend to print to and converting your pictures to that colour space using Photoshop ( Mode ---> Convert to Profile---> Destination Space [select your printer profile]). Failing which, print the photos in sRGB colour space. Most consumer printers work rather decently in sRGB. However, don't print photos that are in your monitor's colour space, cos the printer won't understand that colour space. It may result in weird colours.


    You can always embed the profile in a picture, there will be no harm done. It is just that it will not be necessary if the application opening it is not colour space aware.

    Hope this helps.
    That was very helpful thanx. When I use Adobe wizard to tune the monitor, it always end up at max contrast, and frankly the monitor is way too bright. Is this right? I end up tuning down the contrast so basically the "tuning" would be off again huh?

    So basically if I use sRGB all the way most of my display and prints should be pretty close to the original?

    I have not tried printing from photoshop, only from Photo Editor, so I will try it and see if the colour comes out well. I'm using those Canon All-in-1 scan/copy/print stuff but most bubble jet seem to do a pretty decent job these day, as long as you splurge on the media.

    thanx again for your help.

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