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Thread: Hi Im new

  1. #41
    Member Jer76's Avatar
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    EOS30!! either new or used is

  2. #42

    Default Re: Re: Hi Im new

    Originally posted by Pegasus
    so, do you need to announce to the whole world?
    errr not announcing, just stating a fact

  3. #43

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    Originally posted by Kira
    The one that you can put on lens infront is call a SLR(Single Len Reflex) camera.... Those camera are what we call semi pro or pro camera... The problem with these SLRs is that you'll end up spending more on lens then the camera body itself.... For example, a brand new Nikon F80 body is about $600+ but the nikon lens ranges from $100+ to $20K+ Also, they arn't light..... In addition, a digital SLR camera is in the range of $2k++ to $15K....

    Or you can get those digital camera that can put filters or close up lens.... I think the canon A series allows you to do that.... Not sure about other brands though.....

    I think what you can do now is deciede on your budget and what type of camera to get. Digital or Film.... Lastly, what is your intended subjet?
    i want to get a film one probably
    hope to settle with something semi-pro
    willing to spend all i have
    pathetic amount of 800+
    think i can look into 2nd hand
    hmmm
    heehee thankz for yr advise

  4. #44

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    Originally posted by Jer76
    EOS30!! either new or used is
    hi r u saying the cannon eos 300v?

  5. #45
    Member Jer76's Avatar
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    Originally posted by cherry
    hi r u saying the cannon eos 300v?
    Nope its the EOS30.. not EOS300v. Just bought one and i'm still very impressed.. if u taking street/candids of people it's AF is fast enough.. it costs ard $720 new.. 2nd hand price i'm not too sure.

  6. #46
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    Welcome!!!

    I'm sure this would be the beginning of a exciting (and of course expensive... ) journey...

    Well, do not hurry into buying a camera, new or old... read up more (either in clubsnap newbie threads or from the internet) first. There are a lot of camera manufacturers around, with the main ones from Nikon, Canon, Minolta, Olympus, Sigma... blah blah... The more popular (but not necessarily better) ones are first two mentioned above. Most importantly, get advice from those who are most experience on the pros and cons of the different makes and then decide what make, and the type of lenses that you may like to invest... Go to SEED and get a try-out on the different cameras.

    Don't sink all you have on a camera and lenses... Don't forget you'd need moolas for films; and that's more important than the camera itself.

    Explore and enjoy....

    Cheers...

  7. #47

    Talking

    Originally posted by cherry

    cool....actually i never really like digital stuff
    hahaha prefer something more manual..more traditional
    but film camera even more things to learn
    can tell me more abt film camera pls pls
    film cameraz got more thingz to learn ..... ?? .....

    not necezzary lah .....


  8. #48

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    moved to a more suitable sub-forum.....

    let rock and roll!!~~~

  9. #49

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    u dont start with equiptment

    u start with vision

  10. #50
    Member patch17's Avatar
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    if you don't really mind 2nd hand, I suggest checking out cash converters. IMO, some of the stuff they got for sale are pretty good at next to rock bottom prices.

    A couple of recent purchases I made were a Minolta X700 with a 35-70 macro MD lens for S$90 (lens $40, body $50). Both body and lens were in excellent condition. Or how about a Nikon F801s body for $250, practically brand new. The rest of the money you save can be spent on better glass, flash and tripod or bag.

    if you want to try and learn, I reckon you shouldn't plonk your hard earned $$ on the latest gear, only to have it sit in your shelf once you've tired of the hobby.

    Oh, btw, welcome to the club.
    Today is a gift; that's why it's called the present.
    The toys

  11. #51

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    Go to The Camera Workshop, in the Peninsula Shopping Centre (the one on opposite sides of the road to Peninsula Plaza) and ask for Daniel. If he is not too busy he will probably help you choose something second hand.

    The rule of thumb is to buy a cheap body and to keep more for lenses. Cheap does not mean 1) outdated/vintage or 2) lousy. So buy something that is good enough but not too costly, prioritise on lens.

    I started off with a fully manual camera. Think this is good because it does not give you too many gadgets to overwhelm yourself with. So you can concentrate on the basics: composition, shutter speeds and aperture, all set in manual. Playing around with these and getting your prints right will give you a deep sense of fulfillment.

    Soon after you will find out that you have mastered this first camera and would want to have a go at AF, try not to buy and sell on your quest for a bigger camera, it will cost you dearly. Just make your mind on something, buy it and use it for a long while.

    Now you want to choose between film and digital. I am not in digital yet because I am too poor, it will come with time (patience is a great virtue in this hobby, too impatient and your account turns red(reminds of mine right now... dang!)).

    I personally would advise that you shoot slides if you want to have a cheaper way to improve yourself - prints require that you print everything everytime. Sides can be as cheap as 4 something per roll and 4 bucks for processing and optional 4 bucks for mounting. However you will have to buy the necessary stuff to view the slides. I like slides better. Besides since you are starting with a 90 something % viewfinder, slides sorta minimize the croppings that will happen at the lab for prints and will show you more of what you actually shot, which makes it easier for you to know the limits of your camera in the future (too long to explain why...).

    Shooting slides you can either buy film in bulk which allows you to save around 40% and is very fun to load into rolls or get from Dagger who does the loading for you. Bulk buying and loading adds on to the newbie experience, just make sure you get it right the first time. quite simple those... there is a guide on bulk loading on the main page of the forum on your right hand side of the page.

    Sorry not to comment on digital again but I am not qualified.

    But, since I am a nikon user, I would personally advise the following progress in cameras:

    get an FM2 (which is a great camera, fully manual, built like a tank and 96% viewfinder if I am not wrong), then after a while if and only if you want to get more into electronic stuff like AF, Matrix metering, bracketing, auto film advance etc etc, go for F90x or F4, but this is a while down the road from your FM2, you might want to consider cheaper stuff like F65, 70, 75, 80 meanwhile. I like the F4 best in the end but would not hesitate a second to shoot with an FM2, it can last and have lasted a lot of people almost a lifetime...

    The concept is, at the end of the day it boils down to you. Once someone said: a pro camera is what a pro uses as his tool. So, the camera might be the top of the line, but your skills are inadequate and you get unsatisfactory pics. So, polish your skills first, then upgrade your cam as per your needs.

    My two cents worth, please don't take this as word of God. Amateur here...

  12. #52

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    hmmm... I wrote so much?


    Btw, I would advise you not to buy new. Second hand will mean less loss on resale. And buying new might mean that you would avoid using and try to keep, which might make you miss a lot of wonderful pics.

  13. #53

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    erm, which slide cost 4 something per roll?

  14. #54

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    Originally posted by djchris
    erm, which slide cost 4 something per roll?


    Provia 100F is 97 bucks at ruby for 100ft (I asked a couple of weeks ago but had bought at 98 at Cathay).

    I can load 20 rolls (not all are 36 but 32++ exposures (some 32, some more)).

    Divide 97/20 and you get? 4.85

    Last time I bulk loaded, I got about 23 rolls at 32++ but then got to be careful and not waste film in exposing (accidentally or not) too much when loading the small roll. Then put in the fridge...

  15. #55
    Member Jer76's Avatar
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    Originally posted by rapidmax
    . Then put in the fridge...
    slide film if dun put in fridge put in drybox can?

  16. #56

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    Originally posted by Jer76
    slide film if dun put in fridge put in drybox can?
    can.... by putting it in the fridge, you are prolonging the life span of the chemicals in the film.

    So it up to individual.

  17. #57

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    Originally posted by rapidmax
    Go to The Camera Workshop, in the Peninsula Shopping Centre (the one on opposite sides of the road to Peninsula Plaza) and ask for Daniel. If he is not too busy he will probably help you choose something second hand.

    The rule of thumb is to buy a cheap body and to keep more for lenses. Cheap does not mean 1) outdated/vintage or 2) lousy. So buy something that is good enough but not too costly, prioritise on lens.

    I started off with a fully manual camera. Think this is good because it does not give you too many gadgets to overwhelm yourself with. So you can concentrate on the basics: composition, shutter speeds and aperture, all set in manual. Playing around with these and getting your prints right will give you a deep sense of fulfillment.

    Soon after you will find out that you have mastered this first camera and would want to have a go at AF, try not to buy and sell on your quest for a bigger camera, it will cost you dearly. Just make your mind on something, buy it and use it for a long while.

    Now you want to choose between film and digital. I am not in digital yet because I am too poor, it will come with time (patience is a great virtue in this hobby, too impatient and your account turns red(reminds of mine right now... dang!)).

    I personally would advise that you shoot slides if you want to have a cheaper way to improve yourself - prints require that you print everything everytime. Sides can be as cheap as 4 something per roll and 4 bucks for processing and optional 4 bucks for mounting. However you will have to buy the necessary stuff to view the slides. I like slides better. Besides since you are starting with a 90 something % viewfinder, slides sorta minimize the croppings that will happen at the lab for prints and will show you more of what you actually shot, which makes it easier for you to know the limits of your camera in the future (too long to explain why...).

    Shooting slides you can either buy film in bulk which allows you to save around 40% and is very fun to load into rolls or get from Dagger who does the loading for you. Bulk buying and loading adds on to the newbie experience, just make sure you get it right the first time. quite simple those... there is a guide on bulk loading on the main page of the forum on your right hand side of the page.

    Sorry not to comment on digital again but I am not qualified.

    But, since I am a nikon user, I would personally advise the following progress in cameras:

    get an FM2 (which is a great camera, fully manual, built like a tank and 96% viewfinder if I am not wrong), then after a while if and only if you want to get more into electronic stuff like AF, Matrix metering, bracketing, auto film advance etc etc, go for F90x or F4, but this is a while down the road from your FM2, you might want to consider cheaper stuff like F65, 70, 75, 80 meanwhile. I like the F4 best in the end but would not hesitate a second to shoot with an FM2, it can last and have lasted a lot of people almost a lifetime...

    The concept is, at the end of the day it boils down to you. Once someone said: a pro camera is what a pro uses as his tool. So, the camera might be the top of the line, but your skills are inadequate and you get unsatisfactory pics. So, polish your skills first, then upgrade your cam as per your needs.

    My two cents worth, please don't take this as word of God. Amateur here...
    wah rapid thankz for your advise.....i kinda decided liao.....im going for manual film camera....will lookout for 2nd hand.......
    cos digital really ex somemore i dun have a personal pc...so no point...haiz got to save up more $$

  18. #58

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    and oh yar i would like to ask about the slides thing you all toking about...i only know about film leh
    and also to take B&W izt just use a different type of film or izt must change lens?

  19. #59

    Default

    Hello again,

    3 types of film for 35mm:

    1) Print films from which you obtain optimum results when you do prints (this is the conventional way for everyone normally).

    2) Black and White films which allows you to take pics not in colour but in b&w, they come out in prints. You can develop it yourself if you got a dark room and the chemicals - a darkroom can be your own bathroom.

    3) Slide films which allow you to develop your film to get slides, which can be scanned to digital and/or printed on paper or looked at using a slide projected or a light box and loupe. Slides used to suck at printing but now with digital technology that most pro labs are using, it might just turn out better than print film! There are many threads about slides here, look for them, you will learn a lot.

    Slide films are kinda rare in the so-called consumer range (fujichrome sensia is the only one I can think of), most are so called pro films and are much better when it comes to performance (grain, contrast, colour etc). I shoot with fujichrome provia, you have velvia etc etc for fuji and ektachrome, elite chrome and bla bla for kodak. It is just a matter of preference.

    No need to buy anything else, just the film and your camera would do, to shoot slides. It is just about the film. (of course tripod, filters and bla bla, we are getting into that now)

    Just something I picked up somewhere: " when you have shot your first roll of slides, taken it home and you start viewing it on your slide projector, you would wonder why you did not do that (shoot slides) earlier!" For me the impact was at the shop itself when i used their light box and loupe... this rocks man!!!
    Last edited by rapidmax; 11th July 2003 at 06:27 PM.

  20. #60

    Default

    Originally posted by rapidmax
    Hello again,

    3 types of film for 35mm:

    1) Print films from which you obtain optimum results when you do prints (this is the conventional way for everyone normally).

    2) Black and White films which allows you to take pics not in colour but in b&w

    3) Slide films which allow you to take film and when you develop you get slides, which can be scanned to digital and/or printed on paper or looded at using a slide projected or a light box and loupe. Slides used to suck at printing but now with digital technology that most pro labs are using, it might just turn out better than print film!

    Slide films are kinda rare in the so-called consumer range (fujichrome sensia is the only one I can think of), most are so called pro films and are much better when it comes to performance (grain, contrast, colour etc). I shoot with fujichrome provia, you have velvia etc etc for fuji and ektachrome, elite chrome and bla bla for kodak. It is just a matter of preference.

    No need to buy anything else, just the film and your camera would do. It is just about the film.

    Just something I picked up somewhere: " when you have shot your first roll of slides, taken it home and you start viewing it on your slide projector, you would wonder why you did not do that (shoot slides) earlier!" For me the impact was at the shop itself when i used their light box and loupe... this rocks man!!!
    oh i think i know wat it is already.i saw ppl using the light box and something like the microscope to view. u mean a normal camera can load slides instead of films? are slide roll cheaper compared relatively? how much is a light box and a loupe?

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