Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 91

Thread: Laws governing public photography

  1. #41
    Member lennyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,520

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by vince123123 View Post
    From the Youtube video, I would say that the narration of UK law in that video appears more or less similar to those in Singapore.
    Is there a requirement to produce your ID when requested by a police officer in Singapore, when you're clearly not breaking the law? Just curious.

  2. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    579

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    I read this from a forum thread. Not sure who the author is but may worth sharing and reading.


    The Ten Legal Commandments of Photography

    I. Anyone in a public place can take pictures of anything they want. Public places include parks, sidewalks, malls, etc. Malls? Yeah. Even though itís technically private property, being open to the public makes it public space.

    II. If you are on public property, you can take pictures of private property. If a building, for example, is visible from the sidewalk, itís fair game.

    III. If you are on private property and are asked not to take pictures, you are obligated to honor that request. This includes posted signs.

    IV. Sensitive government buildings (military bases, nuclear facilities) can prohibit photography if it is deemed a threat to national security.

    V. People can be photographed if they are in public (without their consent) unless they have secluded themselves and can expect a reasonable degree of privacy. Kids swimming in a fountain? Okay. Somebody entering their PIN at the ATM? Not okay.

    VI. The following can almost always be photographed from public places, despite popular opinion:
    - accident & fire scenes, criminal activities
    - bridges & other infrastructure, transportation facilities (i.e. airports)
    - industrial facilities, Superfund sites
    - public utilities, residential & commercial buildings
    - children, celebrities, law enforcement officers
    - UFOs, the Loch Ness Monster,

    VII. Although ďsecurityĒ is often given as the reason somebody doesnít want you to take photos, itís rarely valid. Taking a photo of a publicly visible subject does not constitute terrorism, nor does it infringe on a companyís trade secrets.

    VIII. If you are challenged, you do not have to explain why you are taking pictures, nor to you have to disclose your identity (except in some cases when questioned by a law enforcement officer.)

    IX. Private parties have very limited rights to detain you against your will, and can be subject to legal action if they harass you.

    X. If someone tries to confiscate your camera and/or film, you donít have to give it to them. If they take it by force or threaten you, they can be liable for things like theft and coercion. Even law enforcement officers need a court order.

    What To Do If Youíre Confronted

    1. Be respectful and polite. Use good judgement and donít escalate the situation.

    2. If the person becomes combative or difficult, think about calling the police.

    3. Threats, detention, and taking your camera are all grounds for legal or civil actions on your part. Be sure to get the personís name, employer, and what legal grounds they claim for their actions.

    4. If you donít want to involve the authorities, go above the personís head to their supervisor or their companyís public relations department.

    5. Call your local TV and radio stations and see if they want to do a story about your civil liberties.

    6. Put the story on the web yourself if need be.
    Mio Cade flickr

  3. #43
    Member lennyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,520

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    I doubt there's many "nuclear facilities" in Singapore. I and III contradict each other with regards to "private property". The phrase "Superfund site" pretty much means this is written for the United States. Singapore law may differ significantly. I'm not even sure if they are accurate for the United States - over here, cities, counties and states have laws that can be significantly different from each other.

  4. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Clementi
    Posts
    10,596

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Lol, I didn't know we have a Loch Ness Monster in Singapore...

  5. #45
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    A quick search throws this up:

    NATIONAL REGISTRATION ACT

    Arrest and search.
    16.
    ó(1) Where any person ó


    (a) is reasonably suspected by a registration officer or police officer of the commission of any offence under this Act or any regulations made thereunder; or
    (b) on demand by a registration officer or a police officer ó
    (i) does not give his name and address;
    (ii) gives a name or address which the officer has reason to believe is false; or
    (iii) gives as his address a place outside Singapore,
    that person may be arrested without warrant by the registration officer or police officer

    Notice that it says give name and address, and not so much giving of the IC itself.

    Of course, there could be some requirement that I'm not aware of, since there are so many laws around. My own humble opinion is that if asked to produce your ID, go ahead and produce it. However, also ask what the problem is, and at the same time, ask the police officer for HIS own ID. Copy down his rank/name/ID as well for future reference if a complaint needs to be lodged later.



    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    Is there a requirement to produce your ID when requested by a police officer in Singapore, when you're clearly not breaking the law? Just curious.

  6. #46
    Member lennyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,520

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Thanks for looking that up, Vince. I have no intention of arguing with a police officer any time soon Advice of getting the police officer's ID is good, but are they required to produce it? For that matter, I don't even know how to tell a real police ID from a fake one, either over here or in Singapore.

  7. #47
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    I haven't been able to find one relating to police officers in general, but located one in the Road Traffic Act:

    Police officer not in uniform to produce identification card
    128. —(1) Every police officer when acting against any person under this Act shall, if not in uniform, on demand declare his office and produce to the person against whom he is acting such identification card as the Commissioner of Police may direct to be carried by police officers.


    (2) It shall not be an offence for any person to refuse to comply with any request, demand or order made by any police officer not in uniform who fails to declare his office and produce his identification card on demand being made by such person.

    I suppose it is not a stretch to say that similar rules should apply for policemen in general. I also found some provisions relating to customs officers.

    If the person is in uniform, you can probably already get his name/rank/id from the uniform.

    Anyway, when in doubt, you can always call 999 and ask them to verify the identity of the police officer. I do recall that has been mentioned in the days of when "Dear Mr Policeman" was still being taught in school.

    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    Thanks for looking that up, Vince. I have no intention of arguing with a police officer any time soon Advice of getting the police officer's ID is good, but are they required to produce it? For that matter, I don't even know how to tell a real police ID from a fake one, either over here or in Singapore.

  8. #48
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    Singapore law may differ significantly.
    I was at National Library at Bugis this afternoon. My friends and I just bough some strobist equipment and are eager to try it out. We were about to go to the 5th floor garden where suddenly a security officer (not police) said that the NL is off limits since it's public holiday.

    So off we went to one of the walls, and started shooting there. After about an hour or so, the same security officer came to us and told us that we are not allowed to do any photoshoot (notice the difference with photography) in the area. She said that it is passed down from the NL guys, so she, as an officer, does not understand anything about it also.

    She told us that there's a no photo sign around the area (which I can't found, yet), so she said that the sign is effective to all the NL area. Since we don't want any problem with anyone -- we pity the officer too, she's quite scared also, we just packed our things.

    So, that rules out public library as one of the public places to take photos.

    Or is it because we used high profile lighting system? High profile does not equal high price nor professional. But the original complainer (don't know who) seems to understand it that way.
    ~~I have 2 bods... Nikon and Nokia
    ~~MyFlickr~MyDeviantart~MyFacebook

  9. #49
    Member lennyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,520

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by chocmuffins View Post
    So, that rules out public library as one of the public places to take photos.

    Or is it because we used high profile lighting system? High profile does not equal high price nor professional. But the original complainer (don't know who) seems to understand it that way.
    Why not write to the NLB or the newspaper and ask for clarification? Phrase it nicely and politely like your post, point out how you cooperated with the security officer immediately at that time, and you'll have public opinion on your side.

    Do you have any photo of your setup? Just curious about how high profile the whole setup is.

  10. #50

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    No photographs or filming may be taken/or surveys carried out in the libraries without authorised permission.

    http://www.nlb.sg:80/page/Corporate_...uide#etiquette

  11. #51
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    Do you have any photo of your setup? Just curious about how high profile the whole setup is.
    Sadly, no. I didn't bring my wide lens to cover all. It's two light stands with two flashes. One of the stands have shoot through brolly. Two cameras on three guys (one didn't bring, thus become the model).

    Quote Originally Posted by splim View Post
    No photographs or filming may be taken/or surveys carried out in the libraries without authorised permission.
    Well, this is inside the library. What we did is on the public place on the ground (the NLB Plaza?).

    Anyway, next time I will try replacing static lightstands with voice-activated lightstands. We'll see how they react.
    ~~I have 2 bods... Nikon and Nokia
    ~~MyFlickr~MyDeviantart~MyFacebook

  12. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Clementi
    Posts
    10,596

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by chocmuffins View Post
    ...
    Anyway, next time I will try replacing static lightstands with voice-activated lightstands. We'll see how they react.
    Now that sounds strangely familiar. Hahaha.

  13. #53
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    North
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by chocmuffins View Post
    Sadly, no. I didn't bring my wide lens to cover all. It's two light stands with two flashes. One of the stands have shoot through brolly. Two cameras on three guys (one didn't bring, thus become the model).



    Well, this is inside the library. What we did is on the public place on the ground (the NLB Plaza?).

    Anyway, next time I will try replacing static lightstands with voice-activated lightstands. We'll see how they react.
    wow....2 light stands and one brolly......3 guys with 2 cameras........
    G

  14. #54
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by chocmuffins View Post
    Sadly, no. I didn't bring my wide lens to cover all. It's two light stands with two flashes. One of the stands have shoot through brolly. Two cameras on three guys (one didn't bring, thus become the model).



    Well, this is inside the library. What we did is on the public place on the ground (the NLB Plaza?).

    Anyway, next time I will try replacing static lightstands with voice-activated lightstands. We'll see how they react.
    Who told you that is a public place? does not belong to the NLB?
    Last edited by catchlights; 2nd October 2008 at 02:19 PM.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  15. #55
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    btw, for the same set up (two light stands with two flashes.), you can't shoot in the botanic garden too.
    Last edited by catchlights; 2nd October 2008 at 02:20 PM.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  16. #56

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    btw, for the same set up (two light stands with two flashes.), you can't shoot in the botanic garden too.
    erm may i know why?

    btw is taking pre wedding shots in botanic garden, esplanade garden, and such is prohibited?

  17. #57
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by tirza View Post
    erm may i know why?

    btw is taking pre wedding shots in botanic garden, esplanade garden, and such is prohibited?
    I can only tell you about botanic garden, this is already state very clear in their official website.
    you can shoot almost anything you want, the restriction is not for commercial usage, (pre wedding or wedding are not under commercial usage) and you are not allow to set up more than one tripod (to them, light stands are consider tripod)
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  18. #58
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    Who told you that is a public place? does not belong to the NLB?
    My definition of public place would be somewhere people can walk in freely without specific permission. Open shopping mall is public, whereas closed (after hours) shopping mall is likely not public.

    What's your definition of public place?

    Wikipedia have definition on public space, but founder said don't quote it without consulting other sources. So the definition there may or may not apply to Singapore.
    ~~I have 2 bods... Nikon and Nokia
    ~~MyFlickr~MyDeviantart~MyFacebook

  19. #59
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    A public place is one which is not owned by any private entity. A private place that is opened for public access, is not a public place.

  20. #60
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by chocmuffins View Post
    My definition of public place would be somewhere people can walk in freely without specific permission. Open shopping mall is public, whereas closed (after hours) shopping mall is likely not public.

    What's your definition of public place?

    Wikipedia have definition on public space, but founder said don't quote it without consulting other sources. So the definition there may or may not apply to Singapore.
    what vince123123 said is correct.

    In Singapore here, I don't think we have any public place here, and many areas are state property if you are not aware.

    So if someone tell you that you can't shoot here or there, don't get too upset.
    Quote Originally Posted by vince123123 View Post
    A public place is one which is not owned by any private entity. A private place that is opened for public access, is not a public place.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •