Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 91

Thread: Laws governing public photography

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    I'm so surprised to find SOOOO many peeps here don't have any idea of rights of photography in Singapore.. SighZzz...

  2. #22

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Maybe I should adopt the age old adage.

    "Do what you want, but don't get caught". That would sound like most Encik WO1's for those guys that have served.
    Canon 40D|EFS 17-55mm f/2.8 IS|70-200mm L f/4 IS|50&85mm f/1.8|EFS 10-22 f/3.5-4.5|580 EXII

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Clementi
    Posts
    10,596

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by All Blue View Post
    bro, i doubt you are reading the thread. i merely enforcing TS concern about the actual rights of a photographer here. of course you are right to say that there's no law it taking photos.
    it's just that you're lucky and i was unfortunate to have to be questioned by the policeman sent by the security guard who called police.
    this was despite i was with a group fellow CS'ers. it's not about misinformation. it's about reality.
    it's alright to be naive until the day you get it. then don't cry "why me?"
    I am naive? Oh please, give me a break.

    If you have nothing to hide, then you have no cause for concern when the police approach you.

  4. #24
    Member lennyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,520

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by tirimasu View Post
    I'm so surprised to find SOOOO many peeps here don't have any idea of rights of photography in Singapore.. SighZzz...
    Oh great master, please enlighten us ignorant.

  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Clementi
    Posts
    10,596

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by tirimasu View Post
    I'm so surprised to find SOOOO many peeps here don't have any idea of rights of photography in Singapore.. SighZzz...
    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    Oh great master, please enlighten us ignorant.
    Yes, please, pray, enlighten us. Sooooo interesting how someone can point out the wrong but not correct it.

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    North
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by calebk View Post
    Yes, please, pray, enlighten us. Sooooo interesting how someone can point out the wrong but not correct it.
    G

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Singapore, east-ish
    Posts
    2,291

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    maybe one of us should just take a walk to the nearest police post and have a nice chat with them?


    uh oh...did i just arrow myself?

  8. #28

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    This my take on this topic.

    There is nothing that prohibits you from photographing in public. But if you are on private property you have to get permission from the owners or the management of the property.

    So if you are for example in Lucky Plaza trying to take a photograph with your DSLR, the security has every right to stop you from photographing. It is private property. The fear is that the photographer may use the image(s) for commercial gain or put the property in a bad light. That's why there is a Property Release, it is a release stating that the owner or management has given you permission to use the images, subject to their approval or without their approval.

    I think some of the people in Singapore think that they have every right to do whatever they want where ever they want. And when stopped by security, they think the security are ignorant and don't know the law and try to act tough and try to bully the security. They are just acting on instructions handed down by the owners or the management. I think the people get stopped are ignorant of the law concerning photography on or in private property.

    IF you so desperately want to photograph a building you can do so on public property. Then again having said that, commercial filming and photographing anywhere in the city sometimes requires that you get a permit. Not too many people know that you need to but sometimes the authorities close one eye when it comes to this.

    I know that in the US, you do need a permit and you also need the police on location, just in case.

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    North
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by hondasleeper View Post
    This my take on this topic.

    There is nothing that prohibits you from photographing in public. But if you are on private property you have to get permission from the owners or the management of the property.

    So if you are for example in Lucky Plaza trying to take a photograph with your DSLR, the security has every right to stop you from photographing. It is private property. The fear is that the photographer may use the image(s) for commercial gain or put the property in a bad light. That's why there is a Property Release, it is a release stating that the owner or management has given you permission to use the images, subject to their approval or without their approval.

    I think some of the people in Singapore think that they have every right to do whatever they want where ever they want. And when stopped by security, they think the security are ignorant and don't know the law and try to act tough and try to bully the security. They are just acting on instructions handed down by the owners or the management. I think the people get stopped are ignorant of the law concerning photography on or in private property.

    IF you so desperately want to photograph a building you can do so on public property. Then again having said that, commercial filming and photographing anywhere in the city sometimes requires that you get a permit. Not too many people know that you need to but sometimes the authorities close one eye when it comes to this.

    I know that in the US, you do need a permit and you also need the police on location, just in case.
    not so sure about requiring a permit to take commercial photography. Think only applies if u come with lots of equipments or u barricade a certain portion of the public property and hindering access to other public users.
    G

  10. #30

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    From my street photography thread:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKl2sEN4yNM

  11. #31

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by milamber View Post
    From my street photography thread:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKl2sEN4yNM
    owww. thats what will happen in britain

    how about here in singapore? anybody tried?

  12. #32

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    i was stopped by the security when i was shooting the F1 tracks (1 week b4 the F1)... but when he drove passed those ang mohs taking pics of the tracks, they didnt say anything.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by Rueven View Post
    i was stopped by the security when i was shooting the F1 tracks (1 week b4 the F1)... but when he drove passed those ang mohs taking pics of the tracks, they didnt say anything.
    That's because the guard is Singaporean

  14. #34

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    hahaha! scare he will lose his job straightaway if he tell off the ang moh tourists. haha

  15. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    X Chu Kang
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    I've not seen any kind of guidelines in any form on such OB markers.

    I take a leaf from HK - when it does NOT say no u-turn, you can do so. If you cannot do a u-turn, there will be a sign saying so.

    Likewise, if there is no "no photography" sign, I just go for it within limits of decency and privacy. Also, as a rule of thumb for myself, people are usually less receptive of their photos being taken at close range and in crowded places, e.g. in trains and buses.

    Then again, in places like car shows where many "shooters" are present, one should expect to be "shot".

    It all boils down to some give and take on both the photographer and the (unintended) subjects.

  16. #36
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    near the Equator
    Posts
    1,255

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by lennyl View Post
    Which brings us back to the TS's original question : is there any specific guideline? If so, what are they, and where can they be found?
    Go look at the statutes in the AGC's website, there are legislation prohibiting photography at certain places.

    And by seeing what is disallowed, avoid those places lah. The rest is pretty much common sense isn't it.

    It's quite terrible to see paralysis of such nature, that we need to tell people that they can shoot, before they go ahead. In the absence of prohibition, do as you see fit.
    Last edited by LazerLordz; 30th September 2008 at 09:11 PM.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

  17. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Clementi
    Posts
    10,596

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Quote Originally Posted by godzilla60 View Post
    not so sure about requiring a permit to take commercial photography. Think only applies if u come with lots of equipments or u barricade a certain portion of the public property and hindering access to other public users.
    It's not so much the hindrance your equipment causes to others, but the fact that you are using the location for commercial purposes. Because you are using it for your commercial gain, you need permission to use the location.

  18. #38
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    Unfortunately YOU ARE WRONG, there is no general prohibition against public street photography. The security guard can call anyone he wants. The police can question me, but at the end of the day, there is no charge that they can make stick .

    If the security guard oversteps his bounds, I will be the one raising a charge against him instead (criminal intimidation, wrongful restraint, wrongful confinement, criminal force, assault etc all comes to mind).

    The only prohibitions that I'm aware of is to take photographs IN a protected place (notice the distinction between, IN and OF).

    Quote Originally Posted by All Blue View Post
    bro, i doubt you are reading the thread. i merely enforcing TS concern about the actual rights of a photographer here. of course you are right to say that there's no law it taking photos.
    it's just that you're lucky and i was unfortunate to have to be questioned by the policeman sent by the security guard who called police.
    this was despite i was with a group fellow CS'ers. it's not about misinformation. it's about reality.
    it's alright to be naive until the day you get it. then don't cry "why me?"

  19. #39
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    If you are on private property, you do not require permission before you can take photographs.

    The law is simply this. In a private property which is open to public access, and where there are no clear notices prohibiting photography, you can take photographs all you please. If the building owner is not happy, he can then change the condition of entry to say that if you want to stay on grounds, you have to stop. If you refuse to stop, you are then trespassing. if you stop, then he can't do anything to you. The most he can do is to ask you to leave.

    And in Singapore, just as with model releases, there is no law governing Property Releases, and the applicability of such is highly suspect. Any building owner who tries to take action based on a lack of a "Property release" will face an extreme uphill struggle trying to make out a new cause of action.

    And contrary to your view, I think that more security guards are ignorant of the law, then photogrpahers are of the law. For sure, as a photographer, I know more about the law than he does. When they try to smoke me, just a few pokes crumbles their armor like a house of cards.

    The laws in the US governing such issues are vastly different from those in Singapore, and hence any comparison is unhelpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by hondasleeper View Post
    This my take on this topic.

    There is nothing that prohibits you from photographing in public. But if you are on private property you have to get permission from the owners or the management of the property.

    So if you are for example in Lucky Plaza trying to take a photograph with your DSLR, the security has every right to stop you from photographing. It is private property. The fear is that the photographer may use the image(s) for commercial gain or put the property in a bad light. That's why there is a Property Release, it is a release stating that the owner or management has given you permission to use the images, subject to their approval or without their approval.

    I think some of the people in Singapore think that they have every right to do whatever they want where ever they want. And when stopped by security, they think the security are ignorant and don't know the law and try to act tough and try to bully the security. They are just acting on instructions handed down by the owners or the management. I think the people get stopped are ignorant of the law concerning photography on or in private property.

    IF you so desperately want to photograph a building you can do so on public property. Then again having said that, commercial filming and photographing anywhere in the city sometimes requires that you get a permit. Not too many people know that you need to but sometimes the authorities close one eye when it comes to this.

    I know that in the US, you do need a permit and you also need the police on location, just in case.

  20. #40
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Laws governing public photography

    From the Youtube video, I would say that the narration of UK law in that video appears more or less similar to those in Singapore.

    Quote Originally Posted by tirza View Post
    owww. thats what will happen in britain

    how about here in singapore? anybody tried?

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •