View Poll Results: Should the doctors have operated on the Iranian twins, Ladan and Laleh Bijani?

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    36 72.00%
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    11 22.00%
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Thread: Should the doctors have operated on the Iranian twins, Ladan and Laleh Bijani?

  1. #21
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    The doctors were very brave to take up this task of separating the twins although the chance was 50-50...In fact, we can never understand what the twins have gone through for the past 29 years....they must have gone through alot of pain and torture to cause them to wanna take the chance...even if it will cost their lives...perhaps if i were them i will still choose this route....What I feel is that from the very first place this operation should not be so publicised...why shoud it be? What is to be gained? But perhaps "viewership...bla bla bla"...I'm sure the doctors will not feel good (guilty??) about the whole thing and it made things worse when some of the public will tend to blame the doctors...the dad of the twins even mentioned murder! I think it's absolutely absurd....

    All in all... I still think they should operate on the twins...they needed help desperately....and hope....

  2. #22

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    Originally posted by psyche
    Who u referring this to? I think no one here is blaming the doctors... WE are just discussing the ethical issues... no absolute right or wrong answers.
    The original question is:

    Should the doctors have operated on the Iranian twins, Ladan and Laleh Bijani?

    So...this leads to many try to do justify whether the doctors should or shouldn't...and I feel just that's not right.

    If this is discuss before the operation, fine. Not after...
    DR KOH KHO KING

  3. #23
    psyche
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    Originally posted by Kho King
    The original question is:

    Should the doctors have operated on the Iranian twins, Ladan and Laleh Bijani?

    So...this leads to many try to do justify whether the doctors should or shouldn't...and I feel just that's not right.

    If this is discuss before the operation, fine. Not after...
    i c... i get your point. Quite true.... but even b4 the operation, I know some who were discussing it.

  4. #24
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    Originally posted by Kho King

    If this is discuss before the operation, fine. Not after...
    Yeah I find it pointless to wonder if they should or should not.

    Whatever it is - the twins went into it despite being informed of the risks.

    They were informed when they saw the doctor in Germany who turned them away. If the doctors in Singapore had turned them away too - I am pretty sure that they would try & find another doctor who would take their case.

  5. #25
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    I think we should RESPECT the wishes of the twins, as well as the feeling of the rest of people who were involved in this whole affair, including the doctors, friends, etc.
    As such we should put a STOP to this discussion.

  6. #26
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    Just thinking aloud and adding another perspective to the discussions in this thread.

    Apart from the technical and ethical implications of the operation, what struck me is the increasing trend of physicians, or in particular specialists in Singapore having a greater say in the "resource allocation" process of "who to save"; "who to be given a better quality of life"; "who shall i spend my time and energy on"... And in a similar manner, by hospitals to decide which patient they would like to sponsor to have all the operational cost involved covered. We all know that the doctors are commonly referred to as the "captain of the team" but what forms the technical and ethical basis to decision making?

    While the operation on the Iranian twin attracted a lot of professional, media and public attention [due especially to the unprecedented nature of such a surgical operation], little is known (though reported... but it was left cold) that there had been a similar request by a pair of Korean twin conjointed at the hip, asking to be separated, only to have gone back in disappointment because they couldn't afford the S$50,000 that is required to fund the surgery. They were hoping that doctors and hospitals in Singapore would, like the Nepalese twin and the Iranian twin, offer to cover the cost... but if i did recall correctly, the article in the ST reported "the parents were hoping... but the hospital did not offer....

    So did the specialists/hospital choose to sponsor this operation after a thorough cost utility analysis and determined that the expected improvement in the quality of life in the Iranian twin is higher than that of the Korean twin? Or were Iranian twin chosen because of the unprecedented nature of the operation which could/should/would add another "first" to the already congested list of "firsts" in Singapore, elevate the "would/could be heros" to the "superstar" status.

    No doubt, these are very difficult decisions to make... but it just leaves me to wonder where we would be heading towards in time to come.

  7. #27
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    The hospital cannot sponsor every conjoined twins coming to them for help. The medical team comprised of doctors from different countries and as this was the chance for them to make medical history, they are more willing to forgo their fees.

    My sympathy goes out to the friends and relatives of the twins.

    God bless.

  8. #28
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    After reading some of the comments here:

    I agree with Kho King that it is easy to talk AFTER......the only good thing to talk after is that this tragedy does serve as a kind of warning to future decisions that doctors should think twice if they want to be 'used' as kind of a 'tool' for people to fulfill their medical wishes. It may sound rash........

    There is I think no need to blame this on the doctors and the team, the twins has taken up the responsibility of what would happen to them during and after the operation, whether they be still alive or not and whether they could lead a normal live as most of us do. They knew and were told of the dangers and possible outcomes. Since we are not conjoined ourselves, who are we to talk about whether the twins should have gone ahead with it or not. It was their choice, not ours. Although the initial posters question was not this, it can not be taken apart.

    I think all of us here don't know the real intentions of the doctors and all the other people involved, as someone mentioned before here that it could be a breakthrough that puts Singapore in the book of medical history, I do think there is some truth in this as a scientist myself. Especially in the light of the Korean twins that were not approved, on grounds that we don't know too here. We all are human beings and there is some urge to make some name in your profession. Although this is I think against the medical ethics off course. The ethics were made specifically to reign these kinds of thoughts (like all ethic rules). But again, we can never be sure what the doctors intentions were, only they know........
    But there was I believe also the real urge in them to relieve the twins from the stress they have endured during their 29 years of life, after meeting with them, they felt compassion too and had to try it. We have to respect this choice they made.

    Well, this was my thinking, I really felt sad about hearing the news, and I wish them a better life in the here after.

    Hong Sien
    Last edited by hongsien; 10th July 2003 at 02:05 PM.

  9. #29

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    unfortunately we only have 60/60 hindsight when we look back but never the same foresight when we look forward... so....

    would we be asking this qn if the operation had succeeded? what would we say if the operation went 100% successful? that the decision made was still wrong? hmmm...

  10. #30
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    Originally posted by lauLEE
    I think we should RESPECT the wishes of the twins, as well as the feeling of the rest of people who were involved in this whole affair, including the doctors, friends, etc.
    As such we should put a STOP to this discussion.
    Hi all,

    I think this question and a whole lot of others have been discussed extensively already and as a mark of respect (to all parties involved) since there will likely be no black & white answers, only shades of grey and opinions, let's stop this discussion here.

    Peace and good health to all.

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