Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: CPL Filter vs. Graduated ND Filter

  1. #1

    Default CPL Filter vs. Graduated ND Filter

    When it comes to taking landscapes, some prefer using CPL filters while others prefer graduated ND filters.

    What conditions favour each filter? Or is it just a matter of personal preference?

    So far I've only used CPL filters before. It makes the clouds stand out better, as well as preserve the highlights of the clouds. Also, the sky isn't washed out and is a better saturated blue colour.

    I've read that graduated ND filters work better for landscapes, especially when presented with a cloudless sky. Would like to know if it is worth to buying one.
    Canon EOS 40D | 17-55mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS | 300mm f/4L IS | Tamron 180mm f/3.5 | 580EXII

  2. #2

    Default Re: CPL Filter vs. Graduated ND Filter

    I think both got its uses in landscape photography. CPL is just to polarise the light rays whereas ND are meant to even out exposure if the contrast is too much in a photograph and you had to sacrifice one for the other ...

    my thought, if got the mola ... get both ...
    The rule is there are no rules.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Gim Boon Tai
    Posts
    2,909

    Default Re: CPL Filter vs. Graduated ND Filter

    I actully like to use both together, lol.

    Anyway grads are meant for high contrast situation, especially for sunrise/set scenes while polarisers usually do nothing during sunrise/set scenes. It's more for shots with the sun high up in the sky where the polariser can do it's job best at 90 degree.
    If you understand my works, it's photography. If you don't, it's art.
    SplutterPhotography|flickr

  4. #4
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SG
    Posts
    6,232

    Default Re: CPL Filter vs. Graduated ND Filter

    Quote Originally Posted by an606 View Post
    When it comes to taking landscapes, some prefer using CPL filters while others prefer graduated ND filters.
    They work differently and for different functions.
    It is not a matter of preference, more of a matter of necessity

    Quote Originally Posted by an606 View Post
    I've read that graduated ND filters work better for landscapes, especially when presented with a cloudless sky. Would like to know if it is worth to buying one.
    Like mentioned, the GND balance the scene by holding back the brighter areas so as to capture more details without overwhelming your sensor ( and blowing off the highlights )
    Knowing that, it can be applied to lots of different situations, not necessary the typical landscape shots.

    If you see the need to get a GND in your needs, then get one. I myself personally bring a couple of GND for my travels for various situations

    Some people prefer doing HDRI / blending on PP and may not even get one

    Ryan
    Last edited by giantcanopy; 30th May 2008 at 10:42 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •