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Thread: Waiting for the bridge

  1. #1
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    Default Waiting for the bridge

    Hi all,

    I took this picture with my D40X while taking a walk in Toyosu Park in Tokyo. After reading about the advantages of B&W photography I decided to try for myself, and this is one of my favourites for that day. I thought the bridge was an interesting feature for a park, and decided to snap a picture of it. I like the way the structures stand out against the sky. I also liked the inclusion of the cyclist because it shows that the bridge is not just an ornamental feature.

    I would like to get comments on:
    1. Composition - Is it good as it is? Or should I try another angle instead?
    2. Exposure - Is it ok?
    3. Any other comments are welcome too!

    EXIF data is available in the image file. Other than PS' auto-contrast, no other post processing was done, I believe.

    Thanks in advance!


  2. #2

    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    Personally i do not like this pic at all. Too much of whites in a BnW pic. Makes everything seems very over exposed. The pic is slanted as well.
    My Humble Flickr --> The pavement of my thoughts

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    1. Composition - Is it good as it is? Or should I try another angle instead?
    looks quite alright except for the slant and tilt. i can tell the person is waiting for the bridge but perhaps alittle tighter
    2. Exposure - Is it ok?
    no, too much overblown highlights, like nigel84 mentioned, too distracting for me too

    try not to use auto contrast, it might be the easiest way but not the most definitive way. Even using contrast tool on your own can yield better results - more control, more subjective to your preference.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    I don't find this photo pleasant to look at for a few reasons.

    First, the bridge is on the right and that means the cyclist is probably moving to the right when the bridge is drawn back. However, the right is being cropped off. Visually, there is no connection between the cyclist and the bridge. There's so much space on left which suggests absolutely nothing. This photo might just be a whole lot better had you been standing on the other side, taking it from the right. Even straight on would be better.

    The bridge structure is just too close to the frame edges and part of it is cropped off abruptly. Again, this can be overcome if you hadn't left so much space on the left side. Then there's the tilt, which I think isn't that disconcerting. Its better if you can fix it though.

    I find the exposure a tad over, just a tad.

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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    Quote Originally Posted by nigel84 View Post
    Too much of whites in a BnW pic. Makes everything seems very over exposed.
    Quote Originally Posted by sprintist View Post
    no, too much overblown highlights, like nigel84 mentioned, too distracting for me too
    I see... I haven't read up too much on B&W techniques, so this is an important point for me to note. Thanks to nigel84 and sprintist for pointing out.


    Quote Originally Posted by sprintist View Post
    try not to use auto contrast, it might be the easiest way but not the most definitive way. Even using contrast tool on your own can yield better results - more control, more subjective to your preference.
    Hmmm do you guys PP all your pictures? The only reason why I use auto contrast is because it seems to be a fast way of making contrast better than the original, when going through a stack of files. But I think you're right, sprintist - it's definitely better to adjust each one according to situation to get the desired effect.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kit View Post
    First, the bridge is on the right and that means the cyclist is probably moving to the right when the bridge is drawn back. However, the right is being cropped off. Visually, there is no connection between the cyclist and the bridge. There's so much space on left which suggests absolutely nothing. This photo might just be a whole lot better had you been standing on the other side, taking it from the right. Even straight on would be better.

    The bridge structure is just too close to the frame edges and part of it is cropped off abruptly. Again, this can be overcome if you hadn't left so much space on the left side.
    I'll try to keep all these in mind next time. Thanks, Kit, for the detailed explanation. Really appreciate it!

  6. #6
    Senior Member denniskee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    may i suggest you crop away the whole of left draw bridge, yes, some of the right draw bridge will also be crop and it will look like a vertical pano shot.
    photography makes one sees things from all angles.

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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    Quote Originally Posted by denniskee View Post
    may i suggest you crop away the whole of left draw bridge, yes, some of the right draw bridge will also be crop and it will look like a vertical pano shot.
    Hi denniskee, do you mean something like this?



    I think I prefer this to the original, actually. But I can't quite put my finger on the reason why.

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    Senior Member denniskee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    yes, this is what i meant.

    1) i feel there is no point on showing the other side of the draw bridge, it is not interesting enough a subject to be shown repeatedly.

    2) reduces the excess washout sky.

    3) reduces the excess floor. since you are not trying to show the mood of "loneliness".

    4) this is a not so common crop as normally, you see pano in horizontal, not vertical orientation. so it is something fresh.

    5) would have been better if u capture abit more of the right side of the bridge base, but since you didnt, just make the best out of what you have lor.
    Last edited by denniskee; 29th May 2008 at 12:18 AM.
    photography makes one sees things from all angles.

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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    Quote Originally Posted by denniskee View Post
    yes, this is what i meant.

    1) i feel there is no point on showing the other side of the draw bridge, it is not interesting enough a subject to be shown repeatedly.

    2) reduces the excess washout sky.

    3) reduces the excess floor. since you are not trying to show the mood of "loneliness".

    4) this is a not so common crop as normally, you see pano in horizontal, not vertical orientation. so it is something fresh.

    5) would have been better if u capture abit more of the right side of the bridge base, but since you didnt, just make the best out of what you have lor.
    Thanks man! I haven't seen any vertical panos before, but it works well here. Cheers.

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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    Do watch your tones, and do some simple dodge and burn to accentuate the unique features of the bridge.

    I think the black pole on the left distracts, but I would rather retain the entire bridge structure if you're intending to show the relationship between the bridge and the subject, else a disconnection might form.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

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    Default Re: Waiting for the bridge

    Quote Originally Posted by LazerLordz View Post
    Do watch your tones, and do some simple dodge and burn to accentuate the unique features of the bridge.

    I think the black pole on the left distracts, but I would rather retain the entire bridge structure if you're intending to show the relationship between the bridge and the subject, else a disconnection might form.
    Hi LazerLordz, thanks for your comment! Maybe I can crop away the black pole to remove the distraction, and use the dodge and burn method as you mentioned to make the bridge more prominent.

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