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Thread: Grainy photos

  1. #1
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    Unhappy Grainy photos

    Hi ppl, I am new here. Just got my new camera, a Nikon Coolpix P80 last week. Some of the shots I took, especially the nite shots turned out to be grainy. Anyone know how to rectify this? Izzit the setting or the camera?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Theres really little that u can do.
    U most prob used a preset setting on ur cam? On board chip most prob boost the ISO to aid in the capture of the pic resulting in grainy pic. Perhapes, u can play around and see if u can over write the ISO and use a tripod. It should solve bulk of the prob.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Grainy photos

    oh, thats prolly due to high ISO (aka-how sensitive the camera is to light)
    the higher the ISO, the more grainy your shots will be

    just like Legoz said, considering the limitations of a compact, your best bet to remove the grainyness would be to:

    1.lower the ISO (via switching to manual setting?)

    2. Find a way to stabilize the camera, by using a tripod or by leaning against something for support, e.g a pillar or a railing =P


    hope this helps ya

  4. #4

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Good question here...whats the relation between ISO, shutter speed and aperture?

    I have four basic questions in relation to this topic of 'noise collection'.

    Will increasing ISO and shutter speed create more noise?
    Will increasing ISO and aperture create more noise?
    Will increasing ISO and reducing shutter speed create less noise?
    Will increasing ISO and reducing aperture create less noise?

    I was shooting with an ISO of 800 with shutter speeds of 30s and the noise levels are pretty high. Turning on the noise filter makes me lose a lot of the details that I am looking for. So whats the general best setting to use when shooting at high ISO values?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Different cam model will start to show noise at certain high ISO setting. If you are dead particular about noise, you should have done your own comparison of noise appearance to the few cameras that you have on yur shopping basket. I dont see any difference on the speed or how big your aperture effects the noise. Only by adjusting your ISO is the way to control your noise problem. Eg. for you to get a noise free shot at nigh, your setting might be something like slow shutter and setting your ISO at 200 or 400. Thats when you need the tripod. Finally, dont "pixel peep" your image to spot those noise. If your print out is 4R size, view your image at 4R size on the screen to see those noise.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Actually, Most pro-sumers and PnS wouldnt be able to handle ISO very well. I have seen the ixus series and coolpix at ISO 400 and frankly, i wasnt impressed. Not to take anything away from these cameras but these cameras are designed to be consumer friendly in the first place...so there are indeed lots of limitations associated with it and ISO is just one of them. =)

  7. #7

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Quote Originally Posted by srinivasanj View Post
    Good question here...whats the relation between ISO, shutter speed and aperture?

    I have four basic questions in relation to this topic of 'noise collection'.

    Will increasing ISO and shutter speed create more noise?
    Will increasing ISO and aperture create more noise?
    Will increasing ISO and reducing shutter speed create less noise?
    Will increasing ISO and reducing aperture create less noise?

    I was shooting with an ISO of 800 with shutter speeds of 30s and the noise levels are pretty high. Turning on the noise filter makes me lose a lot of the details that I am looking for. So whats the general best setting to use when shooting at high ISO values?
    increasing iso and shutter speed is likely to result in noisy pictures. long exposure and high iso results in a hotter sensor giving noisy pics.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Quote Originally Posted by srinivasanj View Post
    Good question here...whats the relation between ISO, shutter speed and aperture?

    I have four basic questions in relation to this topic of 'noise collection'.

    Will increasing ISO and shutter speed create more noise?
    Will increasing ISO and aperture create more noise?
    Will increasing ISO and reducing shutter speed create less noise?
    Will increasing ISO and reducing aperture create less noise?

    I was shooting with an ISO of 800 with shutter speeds of 30s and the noise levels are pretty high. Turning on the noise filter makes me lose a lot of the details that I am looking for. So whats the general best setting to use when shooting at high ISO values?
    since you're already using a shutter speed of 30s, why would you even need iso 800 ??
    the photo should be bright enough unless you taking shooting stars trails.
    i presumed that you never mount your cam on a tripod right ?
    for entry lvl dslr, stick to between iso 200-400 so as to avoid noise.
    for pro-consumer stick to iso 100-200 any iso above 200 even if you dont pixel-peep, the shadow noise is still there if you printed it out on 4r.
    Last edited by Simon_84; 12th May 2008 at 11:33 AM.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Most (if not all) cameras produce best photos (least noise) at the lowest ISO. For compact camera, the lowest ISO usually starts from ISO 64 or ISO 100. For correct exposure, we use the correct combination of aperture (to control the amount of light) and shutter speed (to control how long the censor receive the light). The combination of aperture and shutter speed actually control the amount of light that the censor could receive.

    For taking photos at low light, the usual way is using maximum aperture (the smallest number) and long exposure time. If you do not use long exposure time, you can increase the ISO setting. Actually, this means the censor will receive less amount of light and the camera will process whatever light receive and give you a good photos -----similar to increasing the sensitivity of the censor or amplifying the signal. However, in this process, the noise produced by the censor is also amplified. You therefore see grainy (noisy) picture if you use high ISO.

    I own Nikon coolpix P5000. The photos taken at ISO 64, 100 and 200 are OK. The photos taken at ISO800 is too grainy.

    I do not know how P80 perform at hight ISO setting. However, please do not expect very good ISO performance from any compact camera of whatever brand. The censor size of compact camera is small and the amount of light that can be received is small (as compared to larger censor sizes used in DSLRs). The signal to noise ratio is therefor low and this will lead to grainy photos if high ISO is used.

    I also use Nikon DSLRs. I find that the photos taken at ISO800 for D70s and ISO3200 for D300 are acceptable (to me).

  10. #10

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    I can understand the issue with regards to long exposures and high ISO. More light, greater amplification due to the greater sensitivity.

    I am still bit confused on how the aperture makes a difference to the noise. Keeping the shutter constant at 1/250, ISO at 1600 and varying the aperture might actually not affect the noise.

    Is there a relation between the aperture and the ISO?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Quote Originally Posted by srinivasanj View Post
    Is there a relation between the aperture and the ISO?
    a relation between aperture and ISO?

    well, if you increase the aperture size (lower F number), more light will fall onto the sensor, so you should lower the ISO setting to achieve a similar exposure.

    Inversely, if you decrease aperture diameter, you should up your ISO to make your sensor more sensitive to the (decreased) light that will be falling onto the sensor.

    imho, increasing aperture size is the better alternative, cos even some DSLRs can't cope with high ISO without horrible noise! Of course, a large aperture will decrease your Depth of Field, sth you may not want depending on the situation

    hope this helps ya =P


    P.S- why were you shooting for 30s at ISO 800? i'm curious

  12. #12

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Daedalus Trent View Post
    P.S- why were you shooting for 30s at ISO 800? i'm curious
    Simple answer...am a bit forgetful and wee bit stupid!

    I was shooting indoors and then moved outdoors for some landscape stuff forgot to turn off the high ISO, rather didnt notice that I had left the setting so high. But was really wondering why JUST a 30s shutter speed was enough for what I was shooting...

    Came back home and wept like a little girl!

    The pics are absolutely unusable!

  13. #13

    Default Re: Grainy photos

    sure it's 30s or 1/30s. 30s is definitely noticeable when you click, it's half a minute wait.
    Shahrul Esa

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Grainy photos

    Quote Originally Posted by srinivasanj View Post
    Simple answer...am a bit forgetful and wee bit stupid!

    I was shooting indoors and then moved outdoors for some landscape stuff forgot to turn off the high ISO, rather didnt notice that I had left the setting so high. But was really wondering why JUST a 30s shutter speed was enough for what I was shooting...

    Came back home and wept like a little girl!

    The pics are absolutely unusable!
    wah you cmos sensor also complained noise...then i ccd shouldn't i be crying at the iso 800/1600 noise performance on my d40...isn't the cmos supposed to have better noise control over ccd (thats how canon advertised their dslr, is it not ?)
    or did you off the noise reduction function in your cam ??
    you can try using noise ninja or neat image (both free softwares) or photoshop to see whether can save the shots a not...chances are the pics after process tends to be softer resulting in loss of details.
    but get rid of the shadow noise 1st and see if is better cos colour noise tend to preserve more of the details in the pic.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Grainy photos

    sometimes grainy photos have more impact!
    "Photography is an austere and blazing poetry of the real" -Ansel Adams

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