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Thread: old photos: handling and scanning

  1. #1

    Default old photos: handling and scanning

    yo all.

    i got a few pieces of old and valuable (to the family only) photos.

    where can i find reliable service to handle and scan them? the are really old a fragile. im not confident to do it myself and further more, i dont have a scanner anyway.

    anyone got recommendations? other than the national historial meusum hjaha

  2. #2

    Default Re: old photos: handling and scanning

    anyone knows?

  3. #3

    Default Re: old photos: handling and scanning

    Give it some time. Today PH, most members are out shooting, with family and friends etc etc etc

    Perhaps you could give a better description of the actual physical condition of the prints.

    Are they warped and brittle? Flaking? Still slightly pliable?

    Or could you take a quick shot of some of the prints and post it up?

    Depending on the actual physical condition of the prints, different processes or techniques could be employed.

  4. #4

    Default Re: old photos: handling and scanning



    picture is around 60 years old. it is held in that frame for the last 10 years. but before that, i have no idea how much punishment it has been thru.

    according to my mum, who likes to exaggerate, it was flaking before it was put into the frame.

    i havent tried taking it out. incase some of it is stuck to the glass.

  5. #5

    Default Re: old photos: handling and scanning

    That sounds pretty major.

    Hopefully some other more knowledgeable members can help suggest.

    One good thing is that the surface has been 'protected' by the glass. That could also pose problems, as you've already identified.

    Meanwhile, if you like, research 'restoring old and damaged photos' online. I also saw a really thick book at the Nat Library on the subject. Might give you an idea of what's at stake/involved, which I suspect might be beyond the usual labs.

    Have you considered a photo-recopy approach without removing the prints from the frame (if all the frames have clear or undamaged glass fronts)?
    Last edited by Dream Merchant; 1st May 2008 at 11:53 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Leong23's Avatar
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    Default Re: old photos: handling and scanning

    You might want to try Fotohub.

  7. #7

    Default Re: old photos: handling and scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Merchant View Post
    That sounds pretty major.

    Hopefully some other more knowledgeable members can help suggest.

    One good thing is that the surface has been 'protected' by the glass. That could also pose problems, as you've already identified.

    Meanwhile, if you like, research 'restoring old and damaged photos' online. I also saw a really thick book at the Nat Library on the subject. Might give you an idea of what's at stake/involved, which I suspect might be beyond the usual labs.

    Have you considered a photo-recopy approach without removing the prints from the frame (if all the frames have clear or undamaged glass fronts)?
    thanks for the adivce man, photo recopy? does that mean taking a photograph of it? something like they photograph cartoons to produce animations?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leong23 View Post
    You might want to try Fotohub.
    thanks@!

  8. #8

    Default Re: old photos: handling and scanning

    Yes.

    It's the least invasive approach unless you're talking about light sensitive material.

    But do consult some of the pro outfits like Fotohub as recommended by Leong23.

    I'm afraid I only have experience working with intact artworks/paintings, and not old, and possibly damaged/fragile prints so I cannot comment on any approaches that some labs may adopt.

    Which was why recommended research on your own part - even if you're passing the job onto someone else, you might want to consider being more prepared with fore-knowledge, and discuss approaches and procedures because ultimately, any lab or restorer will ask you to absolve them from any sort of damage or destruction. This is normal.

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