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Thread: Guidelines to using velvia?

  1. #1

    Default Guidelines to using velvia?

    I got a roll of velvia to shot architecture. I found that a portion of my slides came out slightly over-exposed. So, is it that when using velvia, should i purposely decrease the exposure value? Or when i send in for processing, i ask the people to pull 1 stop?
    And when i am shooting, places with those flourcent lighting(eg office rooms), it comes out green, is it normal because of the different colour temperature?

  2. #2
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    Which SLR are u using? Did u set your ISO correctly?

  3. #3
    psyche
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    Default Re: Guidelines to using velvia?

    Originally posted by sweat100
    I got a roll of velvia to shot architecture. I found that a portion of my slides came out slightly over-exposed. So, is it that when using velvia, should i purposely decrease the exposure value? Or when i send in for processing, i ask the people to pull 1 stop?
    And when i am shooting, places with those flourcent lighting(eg office rooms), it comes out green, is it normal because of the different colour temperature?
    Make sure you do a series of exposure tests with your camera and make sure you meter at the right places. Don't pull process the slides in your situation! Slides are tricky to shoot with especially for beginners. Velvia or other brands for that matter should not give the problem you've mentioned.

    Yes, the film you used is meant for "daylight". Fluorescent lighting is at a different colour temperature and this makes your prints/slides appear green.

  4. #4
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    Just keep this in mind, you should always expose for the highlights if you don't want to blow them away.

  5. #5

    Default

    I am using the Canon A1 with a 15 mm fisheye. The iso is set correctly. What type of metering does the A1 use? Center-weighted average?

  6. #6
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    velvia cannot handle high contrast scene well,maybe u can try a 3stop ND filter to balance the exposure?

  7. #7

    Default

    The problem I suspect is that you are trying to meter off from a wide angle 15mm and depending on the metering in the body this could lead to the overexposure. Velvia has got quite a narrow exposure latitiude so care must be taken in exposing for it.

    Most of the time I used a separate hand held meter to have a better exposure and I ususally set my ISO to 40 when shooting Velvia. You may want to meter the scene with a longer lens other than the 15mm on the subject highlight and see if your results are better.

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